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Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1981

Sanitation

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

G81-548 Organic Gardening In The Backyard (Revised June 1990), Dale T. Lindgren, Don Steinegger, Frederick P. Baxendale, John E. Watkins Jan 1981

G81-548 Organic Gardening In The Backyard (Revised June 1990), Dale T. Lindgren, Don Steinegger, Frederick P. Baxendale, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Successful organic gardening requires consideration of many factors, including resistant cultivars, crop rotation, sanitation, incorporation of organic matter, garden location, and insect and disease control.

Organic gardening is growing in popularity. Although this technique traditionally has been limited to backyard gardens, commercial organic farms now exist in Nebraska. The phrase "organically grown" generally refers to produce grown and processed without the use of synthetic organic chemicals in pesticides, fertilizers, preservatives, or flavorings. The main arguments for organic gardening are that food is less likely to contain potentially harmful chemicals and that fewer chemicals are released into the environment. Arguments against ...


G81-542 The Home Laying Flock, Part Ii Management, Earl W. Gleaves Jan 1981

G81-542 The Home Laying Flock, Part Ii Management, Earl W. Gleaves

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide contains management suggestions pertinent to the home laying flock.

NebGuide G81-541, The Home Laying Flock, Part I: Getting Started, provides information on the early decisions, housing, equipment and some management procedures related to these topics. This NebGuide covers other management suggestions pertinent to the home laying flock.


G81-574 Reproductive Diseases In Cattle, Duane Rice Jan 1981

G81-574 Reproductive Diseases In Cattle, Duane Rice

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The reproductive diseases mentioned in this NebGuide comprise some of the more common problems confronting the cattle industry today.

Although many advances have been made in controlling reproductive diseases in cattle, serious losses are still common. These losses can be reduced by recognizing the diseases and following the proper management recommendations that are available today. Nearly 50 percent of reproductive failure in cattle is due to infectious diseases, and there are vaccines available that can prevent some of these. Management recommendations may include: 1) vaccines, 2) general sanitation, 3) artificial insemination (AI) or, if a problem is already present, 4 ...