Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1981

Field crops

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Education

G81-544 Residue Management For Soil Erosion Control, Elbert C. Dickey, David P. Shelton, Paul J. Jasa Jan 1981

G81-544 Residue Management For Soil Erosion Control, Elbert C. Dickey, David P. Shelton, Paul J. Jasa

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses how crop residue can be used to control soil erosion.

Crop residue is increasingly being used as a major tool to reduce the loss of one of Nebraska's most valuable resources--its topsoil. Soil erosion and the subsequent sedimentation have been identified as major water quality problems in the state. Residue reduces soil erosion caused by both wind and water. However, this NebGuide deals mainly with soil erosion caused by water since it accounts for 80 percent of Nebraska's soil loss.


G81-581 Cross Fences For Pastures Under Center Pivot Irrigation, James T. Nichols Jan 1981

G81-581 Cross Fences For Pastures Under Center Pivot Irrigation, James T. Nichols

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses different types of fences for center pivot irrigated pastures.

Irrigated pastures produce more forage and maintain stands longer under a "graze-rest" system of use. When grazing is practiced season-long, cross fences are necessary to control 1) when and for how long grazing is permitted on a particular pasture, and 2) the degree of desired use. These controls are not possible without cross fences, and sound grazing management becomes difficult.


G81-551 Ecofarming: Spring Row Crop Planting And Weed Control In Winter Wheat Stubble, Gail A. Wicks, Norman L. Klocke Jan 1981

G81-551 Ecofarming: Spring Row Crop Planting And Weed Control In Winter Wheat Stubble, Gail A. Wicks, Norman L. Klocke

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Weed control, stubble management and planters for planting in winter wheat stubble are covered here.

Planting corn, sorghum or soybeans into untilled, weed-free winter wheat stubble that is 10 months old is an accepted practice in the Central Great Plains States. In Nebraska, this system is known as ecofallow. Treating the stubble with herbicides following wheat harvest (ecofallow) offers several advantages:

Weed and volunteer wheat growth can be eliminated. Weed growth robs valuable moisture that could be used by the next year's crop.

Standing stubble provides an excellent snow trap during the winter. Snow melt can provide moisture for ...


G81-546 Ecofarming: Fallow Aids In Winter Wheat-Fallow Rotation, Gail A. Wicks, Charles R. Fenster Jan 1981

G81-546 Ecofarming: Fallow Aids In Winter Wheat-Fallow Rotation, Gail A. Wicks, Charles R. Fenster

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the use of ecofarming to control weeds and manage crop residues.

Ecofarming is defined as a system of controlling weeds and managing crop residues throughout a crop rotation with minimum use of tillage so as to reduce soil erosion and production costs while increasing weed control, water infiltration, moisture conservation and crop yields. Energy requirements are much lower with ecofallow than with normal fallow systems. The ecofallow period in the 3-year rotation is the period between wheat or other small grain harvest and the planting of corn or sorghum. The fallow period in the 2-year rotation occurs ...


G81-563 Grazing Management Of Irrigated Grass Pastures, James T. Nichols Jan 1981

G81-563 Grazing Management Of Irrigated Grass Pastures, James T. Nichols

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses factors and principles of plant growth that influence irrigated pasture production; suggests management practices that allow irrigated pastures to express their production potential; and suggests stocking rates for various levels of production and classes of cattle.

Grazing management has a major impact on the production potential from irrigated pasture. Proper management practices can maximize pasture production -- poor management ultimately results in unacceptable production levels.