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Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1981

Chicken

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

Heg81-145 The Cut Up Chicken, Part I, Daniel E. Bigbee Jan 1981

Heg81-145 The Cut Up Chicken, Part I, Daniel E. Bigbee

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide shows how to cut a chicken carcass into breast with ribs, wings, thighs with back, and drumsticks. You can save from 5 to 10 cents per pound if you cut up your own broiler-fryer chickens. There are two basic ways of cutting the chicken carcass. This guide shows how to cut the carcass into breast with ribs, wings, thighs with back, and drumsticks. The Cut Up Chicken, Part II, HEG 81-146, shows how to cut these parts with the ribs and back as separate pieces.


Heg81-144 Home Processing Of Chickens, Daniel E. Bigbee Jan 1981

Heg81-144 Home Processing Of Chickens, Daniel E. Bigbee

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides complete step-by-step instructions with pictures for home processing of chickens. Steps for processing chickens are feed withdrawal, killing, scalding, plucking, eviscerating, cooling, packaging, and freezing.


Heg81-143 Meat Storage Guidelines, H. Dwight Loveday, Sheri Horn Jan 1981

Heg81-143 Meat Storage Guidelines, H. Dwight Loveday, Sheri Horn

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Because meat is a highly perishable food item, extra care and attention are needed to ensure that a high quality, wholesome product is served.

Unwholesomeness and spoilage of meat are caused by bacteria and other microorganisms. This contamination generally occurs during cutting and processing. These bacteria require three conditions for growth:

low acidity (near neutral pH) level within the meat;

an available supply of water or other moisture, such as meat juices;

a warm temperature -- generally between 45° and 127°F.

Therefore, to prevent spoilage and the possibility of food borne illness, precautions must be taken to control these three ...