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Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1981

Beef

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

G81-539 Assisting The Beef Cow At Calving Time, Gene H. Deutscher, Donald B. Hudson Jan 1981

G81-539 Assisting The Beef Cow At Calving Time, Gene H. Deutscher, Donald B. Hudson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication acquaints cattle producers with calving management principles to minimize calf loss. The objective is to deliver a live calf from every cow. Six to ten percent of all calves born in beef cow herds in the U.S. die at or soon after birth. Approximately half of those deaths are due to calving difficulty (dystocia). This multi-million dollar annual loss is second only to losses from cows failing to conceive. Calving difficulty has received much more attention in recent years, primarily because of the mating of larger European breeds of bulls to British breeds of cows. Increased calving ...


Heg81-143 Meat Storage Guidelines, H. Dwight Loveday, Sheri Horn Jan 1981

Heg81-143 Meat Storage Guidelines, H. Dwight Loveday, Sheri Horn

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Because meat is a highly perishable food item, extra care and attention are needed to ensure that a high quality, wholesome product is served.

Unwholesomeness and spoilage of meat are caused by bacteria and other microorganisms. This contamination generally occurs during cutting and processing. These bacteria require three conditions for growth:

low acidity (near neutral pH) level within the meat;

an available supply of water or other moisture, such as meat juices;

a warm temperature -- generally between 45° and 127°F.

Therefore, to prevent spoilage and the possibility of food borne illness, precautions must be taken to control these three ...


G81-574 Reproductive Diseases In Cattle, Duane Rice Jan 1981

G81-574 Reproductive Diseases In Cattle, Duane Rice

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The reproductive diseases mentioned in this NebGuide comprise some of the more common problems confronting the cattle industry today.

Although many advances have been made in controlling reproductive diseases in cattle, serious losses are still common. These losses can be reduced by recognizing the diseases and following the proper management recommendations that are available today. Nearly 50 percent of reproductive failure in cattle is due to infectious diseases, and there are vaccines available that can prevent some of these. Management recommendations may include: 1) vaccines, 2) general sanitation, 3) artificial insemination (AI) or, if a problem is already present, 4 ...