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Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1973

Trees

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

G73-60 Working With Wood I. Home Drying Lumber (Revised July 1987), Michael Kuhns, Richard Straight Jan 1973

G73-60 Working With Wood I. Home Drying Lumber (Revised July 1987), Michael Kuhns, Richard Straight

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Avoid the expense of kiln-dried lumber by processing and drying your own lumber at home.

Anyone who has done much woodworking knows how expensive high quality, kiln-dried, hardwood lumber can be. Even kiln-dried construction lumber is expensive. Besides expense, there also may be problems with finding certain species of wood, highly figured wood, or hardwood boards thicker than one inch (4/4).

One way to avoid these problems is to dry your own lumber. Green, unsurfaced, or unplaned lumber can be obtained from many small sawmills in Nebraska and surrounding states. You may also want to obtain your own logs ...


G73-4 Bagworms (Revised June 1987), Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1973

G73-4 Bagworms (Revised June 1987), Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Bagworms can damage juniper, arborvitae, pine, and spruce. Description, life history, and control are discussed in this publication.

The bagworm is native to the United States and is found in eastern Nebraska. Bagworms feed on many species of trees and shrubs, but are most common on junipers. They are rarely a serious problem on deciduous trees, except when larvae move away from evergreens.


G73-12 Iris Borer Control, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1973

G73-12 Iris Borer Control, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Scouting, prevention and control of the iris borer.

This insect is the most serious insect pest of iris in Nebraska and is found virtually everywhere in the state. Damage is characterized by dark, streaked, or watery areas and ragged edges on the developing leaves of iris in May and June and extensive destruction of the insides of the rhizomes in July and early August. Examination late in summer will reveal a large white to pinkish caterpillar from 1 1/2 to 2 inches long in the rhizome, usually accompanied by a foul-smelling soft rot.