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Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1973

Soil

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

G73-66 Mound Design For Feedlots, Paul Q. Guyer Jan 1973

G73-66 Mound Design For Feedlots, Paul Q. Guyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Shaping each feedlot pen to minimize mud problems is an important part of feedlot design.

Mud is our most costly weather hazard. Shaping each feedlot pen to minimize mud problems is an important part of feedlot design. While mud cannot be eliminated, proper shaping can reduce the number of days when it is a profit robber. And, proper shaping will also reduce the number of fly breeding areas within the pen, adding to summer comfort and gains. The cost is minimal at most locations if shaping is done before installing fencing, bunks, waterers and aprons.


G73-58 Programmed Soil Moisture Depletion: Top Yields With Least Water (Revised), Paul E. Fischbach, Burt R. Sommerhalder Jan 1973

G73-58 Programmed Soil Moisture Depletion: Top Yields With Least Water (Revised), Paul E. Fischbach, Burt R. Sommerhalder

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The development of automated irrigation has introduced a revised concept to irrigation water management that will mean savings of water and energy. By not completely refilling the root zone each irrigation, soil moisture storage capacity is left within the root zone to take advantage of any rainfall that occurs after an irrigation. Conservation of water is important because supplies are being depleted in many areas.


G73-2 Fertilizer Management For Alfalfa (Revised August 1977), Delno Knudsen, George Rehm Jan 1973

G73-2 Fertilizer Management For Alfalfa (Revised August 1977), Delno Knudsen, George Rehm

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Adequate soil fertility is necessary for alfalfa production on both dryland and irrigated soils of Nebraska. With adequate, but not excessive fertilizer programs, irrigated alfalfa should produce 6 to 8 tons per acre. Dryland alfalfa on the same soils should, on the average, produce 2 to 3 tons per acre.

This NebGuide covers the following areas for fertilizer management for alfalfa: soil and water tests, lime, fertilizer for establishment, phosphorus, potassium, sulfur, micronutrients, nitrogen recommendations and special problems.