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Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1973

Moisture

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

G73-14 Grain Processing For Feedlot Cattle, Paul Q. Guyer Jan 1973

G73-14 Grain Processing For Feedlot Cattle, Paul Q. Guyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Several changes have occurred in the cattle feeding business which have focused attention on grain processing. The first of these was, the arrival of big feedlots provided an opportunity to use larger and more sophisticated processing equipment at reasonable cost per ton of feed produced. Also, the need to minimize feed separation and digestive disturbances encouraged the use of more sophisticated methods of processing.

A second development that is now focusing attention on grain processing is the rapidly increasing costs of equipment, fuel and labor involved in grain processing. In recent years, these have been increasing more rapidly than the ...


G73-15 Handling Feed Moisture In Ration Formulation And Inventory Control (Revised December 1983), Paul Q. Guyer Jan 1973

G73-15 Handling Feed Moisture In Ration Formulation And Inventory Control (Revised December 1983), Paul Q. Guyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nutritional quality control begins with knowing and adjusting for variation in the moisture content of feed ingredients. Moisture variations in feeds are almost always of more importance than variations in protein, mineral, and energy. Inventory control is affected by moisture content of feeds. Some feeds on hand are constantly changing in moisture content, and these changes frequently lead to financial losses when a price adjustment is not made for moisture losses.


G73-58 Programmed Soil Moisture Depletion: Top Yields With Least Water (Revised), Paul E. Fischbach, Burt R. Sommerhalder Jan 1973

G73-58 Programmed Soil Moisture Depletion: Top Yields With Least Water (Revised), Paul E. Fischbach, Burt R. Sommerhalder

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The development of automated irrigation has introduced a revised concept to irrigation water management that will mean savings of water and energy. By not completely refilling the root zone each irrigation, soil moisture storage capacity is left within the root zone to take advantage of any rainfall that occurs after an irrigation. Conservation of water is important because supplies are being depleted in many areas.