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Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1973

Livestock

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

G73-14 Grain Processing For Feedlot Cattle, Paul Q. Guyer Jan 1973

G73-14 Grain Processing For Feedlot Cattle, Paul Q. Guyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Several changes have occurred in the cattle feeding business which have focused attention on grain processing. The first of these was, the arrival of big feedlots provided an opportunity to use larger and more sophisticated processing equipment at reasonable cost per ton of feed produced. Also, the need to minimize feed separation and digestive disturbances encouraged the use of more sophisticated methods of processing.

A second development that is now focusing attention on grain processing is the rapidly increasing costs of equipment, fuel and labor involved in grain processing. In recent years, these have been increasing more rapidly than the ...


G73-66 Mound Design For Feedlots, Paul Q. Guyer Jan 1973

G73-66 Mound Design For Feedlots, Paul Q. Guyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Shaping each feedlot pen to minimize mud problems is an important part of feedlot design.

Mud is our most costly weather hazard. Shaping each feedlot pen to minimize mud problems is an important part of feedlot design. While mud cannot be eliminated, proper shaping can reduce the number of days when it is a profit robber. And, proper shaping will also reduce the number of fly breeding areas within the pen, adding to summer comfort and gains. The cost is minimal at most locations if shaping is done before installing fencing, bunks, waterers and aprons.


G73-57 Hot Weather Livestock Stress, Allen C. Wellman Jan 1973

G73-57 Hot Weather Livestock Stress, Allen C. Wellman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

During periods of high temperatures and humidity, livestock losses can occur from "Hot Weather Stress." How weather stress is particularly hazardous to closely confined livestock (those in feedlots, sorting and holding pens, trucks and rail cars). High relative humidity when the temperature is at 80 degrees or higher adds to the likelihood of profit-stealing losses if necessary precautions are not taken.

Nebraska livestock producers can make their livestock handling and marketing plans flexible enough or take necessary precautions to reduce or eliminate livestock hot weather stress by following this Livestock Weather Hazard Guide.