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Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1973

Extension publications

Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in Education

G73-20 Fertilizing Through Center Pivots, Paul E. Flschbach Jan 1973

G73-20 Fertilizing Through Center Pivots, Paul E. Flschbach

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

There are two decisions and three sources of information that are needed before applying fertilizer solutions through a center-pivot sprinkler system. These are discussed in this publication.

The decisions are: the amount of nitrogen to be applied per acre through center-pivot sprinkler system; and the kind of fertilizer solution to be applied.

The information needed is: the number of acres that will be irrigated in one revolution of the center-pivot sprinkler system; the amount of time required to make one revolution of the center-pivot sprinkler system; and the rate at which your porportioning pump can inject a fertilizer solution into ...


G73-15 Handling Feed Moisture In Ration Formulation And Inventory Control (Revised December 1983), Paul Q. Guyer Jan 1973

G73-15 Handling Feed Moisture In Ration Formulation And Inventory Control (Revised December 1983), Paul Q. Guyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nutritional quality control begins with knowing and adjusting for variation in the moisture content of feed ingredients. Moisture variations in feeds are almost always of more importance than variations in protein, mineral, and energy. Inventory control is affected by moisture content of feeds. Some feeds on hand are constantly changing in moisture content, and these changes frequently lead to financial losses when a price adjustment is not made for moisture losses.


G73-42 Slaughter Cattle Sale Choices (Revised June 1976), Allen C. Wellman Jan 1973

G73-42 Slaughter Cattle Sale Choices (Revised June 1976), Allen C. Wellman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Cattle sold for slaughter can be sold either on a live or carcass weight basis. The ability to compare bid price for these two alternatives is necessary if the producer is to receive the maximum return from the cattle being sold. This publication discusses these choices for the livestock producer to use.


G73-31 Design And Construction Of Grain Bin Floors (Revised May 1979), Gerald R. Bodman, Thomas L. Thompson Jan 1973

G73-31 Design And Construction Of Grain Bin Floors (Revised May 1979), Gerald R. Bodman, Thomas L. Thompson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The foundation and floor for a new or used grain bin performs several functions. In addition to supporting the grain and the bin, it protects the grain from moisture and rodents, prevents settlement of the bin, and anchors the bin. Good design and careful construction are necessary to assure that the bin will perform in a satisfactory manner. For efficient operation, a bin floor must be capable of serving as an integrated part of the total grain handling system.


G73-30 The Alfalfa Weevil (Revised May 1989), Stephen D. Danielson, David L. Keith, George Manglitz Jan 1973

G73-30 The Alfalfa Weevil (Revised May 1989), Stephen D. Danielson, David L. Keith, George Manglitz

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The alfalfa weevil is the primary insect pest of alfalfa in Nebraska. Management is essential during years when weevil infestations are high.

Damage from the alfalfa weevil can be severe. The life cycle of this pest and methods of managing it are discussed in this publication.


G73-62 Webworm Control In Sugarbeets (Revised March 1979), Arthur F. Hagen Jan 1973

G73-62 Webworm Control In Sugarbeets (Revised March 1979), Arthur F. Hagen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The sugarbeet webworm and the alfalfa webworm attack sugarbeets. Frequent outbreaks have been reported in sugarbeets from both species, so they are now generally listed only as "webworms." Their life history, damage and control are similar and are discussed in this publication.


G73-61 Pale Striped Flea Beetle In Sugarbeets And Beans (Revised March 1979), Arthur F. Hagen Jan 1973

G73-61 Pale Striped Flea Beetle In Sugarbeets And Beans (Revised March 1979), Arthur F. Hagen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Only small areas of western Nebraska appear to be troubled by this insect at present, but it appears to be infesting larger areas of sugarbeets each year.

This publication discusses the life history, damage and control of the pale striped flea beetle in sugarbeets and beans.


G73-58 Programmed Soil Moisture Depletion: Top Yields With Least Water (Revised), Paul E. Fischbach, Burt R. Sommerhalder Jan 1973

G73-58 Programmed Soil Moisture Depletion: Top Yields With Least Water (Revised), Paul E. Fischbach, Burt R. Sommerhalder

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The development of automated irrigation has introduced a revised concept to irrigation water management that will mean savings of water and energy. By not completely refilling the root zone each irrigation, soil moisture storage capacity is left within the root zone to take advantage of any rainfall that occurs after an irrigation. Conservation of water is important because supplies are being depleted in many areas.


G73-57 Hot Weather Livestock Stress, Allen C. Wellman Jan 1973

G73-57 Hot Weather Livestock Stress, Allen C. Wellman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

During periods of high temperatures and humidity, livestock losses can occur from "Hot Weather Stress." How weather stress is particularly hazardous to closely confined livestock (those in feedlots, sorting and holding pens, trucks and rail cars). High relative humidity when the temperature is at 80 degrees or higher adds to the likelihood of profit-stealing losses if necessary precautions are not taken.

Nebraska livestock producers can make their livestock handling and marketing plans flexible enough or take necessary precautions to reduce or eliminate livestock hot weather stress by following this Livestock Weather Hazard Guide.


G73-2 Fertilizer Management For Alfalfa (Revised August 1977), Delno Knudsen, George Rehm Jan 1973

G73-2 Fertilizer Management For Alfalfa (Revised August 1977), Delno Knudsen, George Rehm

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Adequate soil fertility is necessary for alfalfa production on both dryland and irrigated soils of Nebraska. With adequate, but not excessive fertilizer programs, irrigated alfalfa should produce 6 to 8 tons per acre. Dryland alfalfa on the same soils should, on the average, produce 2 to 3 tons per acre.

This NebGuide covers the following areas for fertilizer management for alfalfa: soil and water tests, lime, fertilizer for establishment, phosphorus, potassium, sulfur, micronutrients, nitrogen recommendations and special problems.