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Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec05-705 Precision Agriculture: Site-Specific Of Soil Ph (Faq), Viacheslav I. Adamchuk, Jerry Mulliken Jan 2005

Ec05-705 Precision Agriculture: Site-Specific Of Soil Ph (Faq), Viacheslav I. Adamchuk, Jerry Mulliken

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Site-specific management of soil pH is a precision agriculture practice that can provide positive economic and environmental impacts on modern crop production. This publication addresses several frequently asked questions related to the meaning of soil pH, lime requirement, and quality of data used to prescribe site-specific management of soil pH. What is soil pH? The term “pH” is defined as the negative logarithm of the hydrogen ion activity, and values range from 1 (very acidic) to 14 (very basic).


G05-1551 Multiple-Year Droughts In Nebraska, Michael Hayes, Cody Knutson, Q. Steven Hu Jan 2005

G05-1551 Multiple-Year Droughts In Nebraska, Michael Hayes, Cody Knutson, Q. Steven Hu

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the history and impact of drought in Nebraska.

Most people understand that droughts have had a major impact on Nebraska in the past. Yet, many Nebraskans continue to be surprised when drought occurs. It is important to remember that droughts, including multiple-year droughts, are a normal part of Nebraska’s climate. This NebGuide discusses the history of drought in Nebraska, and aims to help Nebraskans better understand the range of climatic variability when they plan for drought.


G05-1579 Using Modified Atmometers (EtGage®) For Irrigation Management, Suat Irmak, Jose O, Payero, Derrel L. Martin Jan 2005

G05-1579 Using Modified Atmometers (EtGage®) For Irrigation Management, Suat Irmak, Jose O, Payero, Derrel L. Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the atmometer (evapotranspiration gage) and explains how it can be used for irrigation scheduling. Examlpes are provided to show how information collected with an atmometer can be used to estimate crop water use for corn and soybean.


Nf05-632 Protecting Your Watershed, Thomas G. Franti, Steven R. Tonn Jan 2005

Nf05-632 Protecting Your Watershed, Thomas G. Franti, Steven R. Tonn

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Everyone lives in a watershed. A watershed is the land area that contributes water to a location, usually a stream, pond, lake or river. Everything we do on the suface of our watershed impacts the water quality of our streams, wetlands, ponds, lakes and rivers. Like organs in a body, every part of the watershed is essential. What happens in one part affects other downstream parts. This NebFacts discusses the threat of pollutions in our watersheds, common runoff pollutants, and best management practices for protecting the watershed.


Nf05-631 Understanding Watersheds, Thomas G. Franti, Steven R. Tonn Jan 2005

Nf05-631 Understanding Watersheds, Thomas G. Franti, Steven R. Tonn

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Watersheds are dynamic and unique places. They are complex webs of natural resources, — soil, water, air, plants and animals. Together land and water make a watershed a whole system.

This NebFacts covers what a watershed is, how it works, its functions, how human activities can alter watershed functions, and its management.


G04-1536 Drinking Water: Storing An Emergency Supply, Sharon Skipton, Bruce I. Dvorak, Julie A. Albrecht Jan 2004

G04-1536 Drinking Water: Storing An Emergency Supply, Sharon Skipton, Bruce I. Dvorak, Julie A. Albrecht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Taking a little time now to store an emergency water supply can prepare for all types of disasters. If your water supply is disrupted, you will be able to provide for your entire family and possibly others. Effective methods of preparing water for storage include disinfection with chlorine and storing at room temperature, disinfection with chlorine and freezing, or canning.


Cc03-431 Make Every Drop Count In Your Home Jan 2003

Cc03-431 Make Every Drop Count In Your Home

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

There are four ways to reduce water in your home ...

1. Maintain -- Fix leaks and dripping faucets. Leaks can account for 14 to 25 percent of all indoor water use.

2. Change -- Change the way water is used in the home.

3. Equipment -- Purchase water-reducing equipment and appliances.

4. Think -- Develop creative water conserving practices that are safe and sanitary.

Start wtih the largest water users. The toilet, shower/bath, and clothes washer account for two-thirds of the water used in an average household.


Cc03-432 Make Every Drop Count In Your Home On Your Yard Jan 2003

Cc03-432 Make Every Drop Count In Your Home On Your Yard

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Did You Know...

Weather adjustments to an automatic irrigation system can conserve A LOT of water.

A system applying 1 inch of water to an average size lawn (approximately 5,000 square feet) that has already received sufficient rain wastes over 3,000 gallons of water -- a year's supply of drinking water for 17 people.


Nf02-505 Drinking Water: Chloramines Waters Disinfection In Omaha Metropolitan Utilities District, Sharon Skipton, Bruce I. Dvorak Jan 2002

Nf02-505 Drinking Water: Chloramines Waters Disinfection In Omaha Metropolitan Utilities District, Sharon Skipton, Bruce I. Dvorak

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Bacteria and other disease-causing organisms in drinking water can cause intestinal infections, dysentery, and a variety of other illnesses. Water disinfection reduces disease-causing organisms and prevents the transmission of disease. This publication discusses the disinfection process used by Metropolitan Utilities District and how it will change in 2002.


Ec02-459 Heating And Cooling Systems: Saving Energy And Keeping Safe (Home*A*Syst Worksheet 1), Shirley Niemeyer, Sharon Skipton Jan 2002

Ec02-459 Heating And Cooling Systems: Saving Energy And Keeping Safe (Home*A*Syst Worksheet 1), Shirley Niemeyer, Sharon Skipton

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Your house should be a safe, comfortable place that is affordable and durable. A house is affordable only when costs for heating and cooling are reasonable. Energy bills are lowest if a home is tightly air-sealed and pr0perly insulated and if all mechanical systems are operating efficiently.

This worksheet will help you assess the environment of your home. It will take you step-by-step through current home energy management practices and conditions. Evaluate activities and conditions according to how they might affect energy use and human health. Provide easy to understand "risk level scores" that will help the you analyze the ...


Nf02-507 Manure Testing: What To Request?, Charles A. Shapiro, Charles S. Wortmann, Richard Deloughery Jan 2002

Nf02-507 Manure Testing: What To Request?, Charles A. Shapiro, Charles S. Wortmann, Richard Deloughery

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Manure testing is necessary to make optimum use of manure while protecting water resources. The tests most frequently needed to optimize nutrient management are total and ammonium nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, pH, soluble salts, sodium, and dry matter content. This NebFact is a guide to providing information on a Manure Sample Sub­mission Form for reliable interpretation of results.


Ec01-797 Filtration And Maintenance: Considerations For Subsurface Drip Irrigation (Sdi), Brian Benham, Jose O. Payero Jan 2001

Ec01-797 Filtration And Maintenance: Considerations For Subsurface Drip Irrigation (Sdi), Brian Benham, Jose O. Payero

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

When using Subsurface Drip Irrigation (SDI) systems, it is important to prevent clogging problems before they occur. The best prevention plan includes an effective filtration and water treatment strategy. Depending on the water source and its quality, various combinations of sand separation, filtration and chemical treatments may be required and are discussed here in this extension circular.


Ec01-158 Integrating Management Objectives And Grazing Strategies On Semi-Arid Rangeland, Patrick E. Reece, Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht Jan 2001

Ec01-158 Integrating Management Objectives And Grazing Strategies On Semi-Arid Rangeland, Patrick E. Reece, Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Rangelands account for about half of Nebraska's total land area or about 24 million acres. Much of these expansive natural resource areas are in the semi-arid climatic region of Nebraska where grazing management decisions have a profound effect on ranch survival.

The educational object of this circular is to explain management practices that optimize the sustainability of rangeland-based enterprises. Additionally a decision-support tool is provided for selecting grazing systems best suited to livestock production and natural resource management objectives.


G01-1418 Turf In The Landscape (Revised April 2003), Anne Streich, Steven Rodie, Roch E. Gaussoin Jan 2001

G01-1418 Turf In The Landscape (Revised April 2003), Anne Streich, Steven Rodie, Roch E. Gaussoin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

To many people, landscape design means choosing the right tree, shrub or flower for a particular place. An important aspect of the landscape often overlooked, however, is the use of turf. Turf often becomes the leftover areas in the landscape rather than an integral design element.

Turf is a significant part of successful landscaping. This NebGuide explores the benefits and uses of turf in the landscape.


Ec00-106 Nebraska Grain Sorghum Hybrid Tests 2000, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger Jan 2000

Ec00-106 Nebraska Grain Sorghum Hybrid Tests 2000, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of grain sorghum trials conducted to obtain yield and other information for some of the hybrids being marketed. The 2000 season was the 43rd year that private hybrids were included in these trials.


Ec00-105 Nebraska Corn Hybrid Tests 2000, Lenis Alton Nelson, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall Jan 2000

Ec00-105 Nebraska Corn Hybrid Tests 2000, Lenis Alton Nelson, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of corn hybrid performance tests conducted by the Agronomy Department and the Northeast, South Central, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers of Nebraska and University of Wyoming at Torrington. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


Ec98-1776 Nebraska Groundwater Of Aquaculture, Terrence B. Kayes, Stuart K. Mcfeeters Jan 1998

Ec98-1776 Nebraska Groundwater Of Aquaculture, Terrence B. Kayes, Stuart K. Mcfeeters

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Aquaculture, the cultivation or husbandry of aquatic plants and animals, is the fastest growing component of United States agriculture. Nebraska presently has an extremely small aquaculture industry, but the potential benefits of investing in the development of a large-scale industry are enormous.

Nebraska is one of the nation's most water-rich states. Its groundwater resources are enormous, and include the High Plians Aquafer, which ranks among the world' largest near-surface aquifers.


Ec98-754 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 7: Hazardous Materials And Waste Management, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-754 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 7: Hazardous Materials And Waste Management, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Consider the variety of products commonly used in households, on acreages and on farms: paints, solvents, oils, cleaners, wood preservatives, batteries, adhesives, and pesticides. Also consider the amount of these products which goes unused or is thrown away. Some common disposal practices can create an unsafe environment around the home and may contaminate groundwater. Additionally, many of these common disposal practices violate Nebraska law.


Ec98-758 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 11: Land Application Of Manure, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-758 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 11: Land Application Of Manure, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Stewardship of soil and water resources should be a goal of every livestock producer. Management decisions made relative to land application of livestock manure will influence the ability to attain that goal.


G98-1354 Irrigating Corn, Brian Benham Jan 1998

G98-1354 Irrigating Corn, Brian Benham

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses corn irrigation strategies options and objectives.

There are over 16 million acres in harvested row crop production in Nebraska. About 8 million of these acres are irrigated. Corn occupies approximately 70 percent of the irrigated acreage, or 5.6 million acres. Given this, improving irrigation management on corn production can have significant positive impacts on the quantity and quality of Nebraska's most precious resource: water.


Nfs-1 Forestry Best Management Practices For Nebraska Jan 1998

Nfs-1 Forestry Best Management Practices For Nebraska

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A reference guide for loggers, landowners and managers.

Nebraska's Forest Resource

Forests cover 947,000 acres in Nebraska. Other land with scattered tree cover, including narrow wooded strips along streams, windbreaks, and wooded pasture lands, occupy an additional 1,252,000 acres. Managing Nebraska's forest lands can produce significant benefits without negative impacts; however, careless activities in woodlands can damage water resources, soils, wildlife habitat, aesthetic values, and even the ability to produce future benefits.


G98-1372 Management Recommendations For Blocked-End Furrow Irrigation, Dean E. Eisenhauer, Brian L. Benham Jan 1998

G98-1372 Management Recommendations For Blocked-End Furrow Irrigation, Dean E. Eisenhauer, Brian L. Benham

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Proper blocked-end furrow irrigation management practices can minimize water application, irrigation costs and the leaching of agri-chemicals below the root zone.

The goal of every irrigator should be to apply the right amount of water uniformly to meet crop needs. To do this, irrigators need to know how much water is applied and where it goes. In other words, they need to know how uniformly the irrigation water infiltrates into the soil profile. Achieving a uniform water application is not easy when using furrow irrigation. However, with a better understanding of how irrigation system management affects water distribution and a ...


G98-1370 Abandonment Planning For Earthen Manure Storages, Holding Ponds And Anaerobic Lagoons, Richard K. Koelsch Jan 1998

G98-1370 Abandonment Planning For Earthen Manure Storages, Holding Ponds And Anaerobic Lagoons, Richard K. Koelsch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The purpose of this NebGuide is to define some critical issues to be addressed by an abandonment plan of an earthen manure storage, anaerobic lagoon or runoff holding pond.

A Nebraska construction permit for a Livestock Waste Control Facility (LWCF) requires a written plan defining possible abandonment procedures in the event the operation (and associated LWCF) is discontinued. The plan must be approved by the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) prior to permit issuance.


G98-1360 Drinking Water: Copper, Sharon Skipton, Delynn Hay Jan 1998

G98-1360 Drinking Water: Copper, Sharon Skipton, Delynn Hay

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Too much copper in the human body can cause stomach and intestinal distress such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and stomach cramps. This NebGuide discusses how to determine if copper is in a domestic water supply and options that can be taken to reduce the copper in water. Copper rarely occurs naturally in water. Most copper contamination in drinking water happens in the water delivery system, as a result of corrosion of the copper pipes or fittings. Copper piping and fittings are widely used in household plumbing.


G98-1356 Polyacrylamide – A Method To Reduce Soil Erosion, C. Dean Yonts, Brian Benham Jan 1998

G98-1356 Polyacrylamide – A Method To Reduce Soil Erosion, C. Dean Yonts, Brian Benham

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes polyacrylamide, what it is, how it can be used to reduce soil erosion due to, irrigation and what water management changes must be considered.

Topsoil loss can mean a long-term reduction in soil productivity, crop yield and the life expectancy of downstream storage reservoirs. In the short term, producers are faced with reuse pits to clean or a buildup of soil at the lower ends of fields which must be redistributed. Measures must be taken to reduce or eliminate soil erosion and sustain Nebraska's soil resource.


G98-1376 Drinking Water: Fluoride (Revised February 2005), Sharon Skipton, Bruce I. Dvorak Jan 1998

G98-1376 Drinking Water: Fluoride (Revised February 2005), Sharon Skipton, Bruce I. Dvorak

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses fluoride in domestic water supplies. Fluoride, a naturally occurring element, exists in combination with other elements as a fluoride compound and is found as a constituent of minerals in rocks and soil. When water passes through and over the soil and rock formations containing fluoride it dissolves these compounds, resulting in the small amounts of soluble fluoride present in virtually all water sources.


G98-1369 Drinking Water: Nitrate And Methemoglobinemia ("Blue Baby" Syndrome), Sharon Skipton, Delynn Hay Jan 1998

G98-1369 Drinking Water: Nitrate And Methemoglobinemia ("Blue Baby" Syndrome), Sharon Skipton, Delynn Hay

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the blood disorder methemoglobinemia, its effect on infants and prevention methods. Methemoglobinemia is a blood disorder caused when nitrite interacts with the hemoglobin in red blood cells. Unlike hemoglobin, the methemoglobin formed in this interaction cannot carry sufficient oxygen to the body's cells and tissues. Although methemoglobinemia is rare among adults, cases have been reported among infants, where nitrate-contaminated well water was used to prepare formula and other baby foods. Nitrate in well water may result from point sources such as sewage disposal systems and livestock facilities, from nonpoint sources such as fertilized cropland, parks, golf ...


Ec98-750 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 12: Silage Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-750 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 12: Silage Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Silage is an important feed for livestock-based agriculture. When properly harvested and stored, silage poses little or no pollution threat, but improper handling can lead to a significant flow of silage juices (or leachate) from the silo. Leachate is an organic liquid that results from pressure in the silo or from extra water entering the silo. It is usually a problem only when silage is fresh, or just after storage. This loss of leachate represents a loss of nutrient value from the silage.


Ec98-749 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 12: Improving Silage Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-749 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 12: Improving Silage Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Silage is an important feed for livestock-based agriculture. When properly harvested and stored, silage poses little or no pollution threat, but improper handling can lead to a significant flow of silage juices (or leachate) from the silo. Leachate is an organic liquid that results from pressure in the silo or from extra water entering the silo. It is usually a problem only when silage is fresh, or just after storage. This loss of leachate represents a loss of nutrient value from the silage.


Ec98-748 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 2: Site Evaluation, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-748 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 2: Site Evaluation, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why is the site evaluation important? The effect of farm, ranch or homesite practices on groundwater depends in part on the physical characteristics of your site: soil type, subsurface characteristics and depth to groundwater. That’s why evaluating the soils and geologic characteristics of your site is such an important step in protecting the groundwater you drink. This evaluation focuses primarily on the farmstead or homesite and risk to groundwater, but, to a limited extent, also addresses surface water. The worksheet can be applied to land beyond the farmstead or homesite, but the variation in soils and geologic materials would ...