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Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec05-705 Precision Agriculture: Site-Specific Of Soil Ph (Faq), Viacheslav I. Adamchuk, Jerry Mulliken Jan 2005

Ec05-705 Precision Agriculture: Site-Specific Of Soil Ph (Faq), Viacheslav I. Adamchuk, Jerry Mulliken

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Site-specific management of soil pH is a precision agriculture practice that can provide positive economic and environmental impacts on modern crop production. This publication addresses several frequently asked questions related to the meaning of soil pH, lime requirement, and quality of data used to prescribe site-specific management of soil pH. What is soil pH? The term “pH” is defined as the negative logarithm of the hydrogen ion activity, and values range from 1 (very acidic) to 14 (very basic).


Nf05-632 Protecting Your Watershed, Thomas G. Franti, Steven R. Tonn Jan 2005

Nf05-632 Protecting Your Watershed, Thomas G. Franti, Steven R. Tonn

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Everyone lives in a watershed. A watershed is the land area that contributes water to a location, usually a stream, pond, lake or river. Everything we do on the suface of our watershed impacts the water quality of our streams, wetlands, ponds, lakes and rivers. Like organs in a body, every part of the watershed is essential. What happens in one part affects other downstream parts. This NebFacts discusses the threat of pollutions in our watersheds, common runoff pollutants, and best management practices for protecting the watershed.


Nf05-631 Understanding Watersheds, Thomas G. Franti, Steven R. Tonn Jan 2005

Nf05-631 Understanding Watersheds, Thomas G. Franti, Steven R. Tonn

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Watersheds are dynamic and unique places. They are complex webs of natural resources, — soil, water, air, plants and animals. Together land and water make a watershed a whole system.

This NebFacts covers what a watershed is, how it works, its functions, how human activities can alter watershed functions, and its management.


G03-1504 Lime Use For Soil Acidity Management, Martha Mamo, Charles S. Wortmann, Charles A. Shapiro Jan 2003

G03-1504 Lime Use For Soil Acidity Management, Martha Mamo, Charles S. Wortmann, Charles A. Shapiro

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Soil acidity can reduce crop production by directly affecting roots and changing the availability of essential nutrients and toxic elements. Liming can neutralize soil acidity, but several factors can affect the economic benefits of liming. With continuous cropping, soil pH can decrease (i.e., increase in acidity) because of various factors, including crop removal and leaching of basic cations, application of ammoniabased nitrogen fertilizers, and organic matter decomposition. Adding lime or other materials can raise soil pH to the ideal range for crop production, create an environment for a healthy function of microbes, and increase the levels of calcium or ...


G03-1528 Recommended Seeding Rates And Hybrid Selection For Rainfed (Dryland) Corn In Nebraska, Robert N. Klein, Drew J. Lyon Jan 2003

G03-1528 Recommended Seeding Rates And Hybrid Selection For Rainfed (Dryland) Corn In Nebraska, Robert N. Klein, Drew J. Lyon

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Differences in climate between Lincoln and Scottsbluff are as great as from Lincoln to the east coast of the United States. These climatic differences across the state greatly affect recommended seeding rates for rainfed corn in Nebraska. This NebGuide provides information useful in assessing accumulated growing degree days, soil type and field conditions, average precipitation, and the field's microclimate when determining seeding rate for dryland corn.


Ec02-178 Precision Agriculture: On-The-Go Vehicle-Based Soil Sensors, Viacheslav I. Adamchuk, Paul J. Jasa Jan 2002

Ec02-178 Precision Agriculture: On-The-Go Vehicle-Based Soil Sensors, Viacheslav I. Adamchuk, Paul J. Jasa

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Imagine that you are entering an unknown field and would like to estimate the productivity of the unfamiliar soil. You may pick up a handful of soil to evaluate its color and texture. You also can feel how difficult it is to break a clod apart, roll it into a ball or press out a ribbon. After repeating this procedure at different field locations, soil depths and times, you get a feeling of both spatial and temporal soil variability. Some of this variability can explain the non-uniformity of crop yield. If you collect soil samples and send them to a ...


Nf518 Management Of Phytophthora Diseases Of Soybeans, Loren J. Giesler, Jane A. Christensen, Christopher M. Zwiener Jan 2002

Nf518 Management Of Phytophthora Diseases Of Soybeans, Loren J. Giesler, Jane A. Christensen, Christopher M. Zwiener

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Phytophthora diseases of soybean, present wherever soybeans are grown, is outlined in this NebFact.


Nf01-491 The Corn Stalk Nitrate Test, Charles A. Shapiro, Richard L. Deloughery Jan 2001

Nf01-491 The Corn Stalk Nitrate Test, Charles A. Shapiro, Richard L. Deloughery

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact is about several soil and plant nitrogen tests that have been developed for use, before planting or mid-season, to help farmers decide how much nitrogen to apply to their corn.


Ec01-158 Integrating Management Objectives And Grazing Strategies On Semi-Arid Rangeland, Patrick E. Reece, Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht Jan 2001

Ec01-158 Integrating Management Objectives And Grazing Strategies On Semi-Arid Rangeland, Patrick E. Reece, Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Rangelands account for about half of Nebraska's total land area or about 24 million acres. Much of these expansive natural resource areas are in the semi-arid climatic region of Nebraska where grazing management decisions have a profound effect on ranch survival.

The educational object of this circular is to explain management practices that optimize the sustainability of rangeland-based enterprises. Additionally a decision-support tool is provided for selecting grazing systems best suited to livestock production and natural resource management objectives.


G01-1433, Environmental Stresses And Tree Health, Jon S. Wilson, Mark O. Harrell Jan 2001

G01-1433, Environmental Stresses And Tree Health, Jon S. Wilson, Mark O. Harrell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Environmental stresses cause many health problems in Nebraska trees. Hot and cold temperatures, drying winds, poor soil and root conditions and human activity can damage leaves, bark and roots, and can predispose trees to secondary insect and disease attack. Keeping a tree in good condition through proper maintenance can prevent many environmentally related health problems.

This NebGuide is intended to help tree owners identify tree health problems caused by environmental stresses and provide ways to prevent or reduce damage.


Ec00-154 Precision Agriculture: Soil Sampling For Precision Agriculture, Richard B. Ferguson, Gary W. Hergert Jan 2000

Ec00-154 Precision Agriculture: Soil Sampling For Precision Agriculture, Richard B. Ferguson, Gary W. Hergert

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

As various aspects of precision agriculture are implemented in Nebraska, some of the most frequent questions asked by producers, fertilizer dealers and crop consultants relate to soil sampling. Should I soil sample this field on a grid? What grid spacing should I use? How often should I sample? Can I use a yield map to tell where to soil sample? All of these are good questions, but often we do not have definitive answers. Site-specific management research conducted in recent years in Nebraska, however, provides some direction on how to implement a soil sampling program for precision agriculture.


G00-1417 Site Preparation: Key To Successful Conservation Tree Planting In Western Nebraska (Revised February 2002), Doak Nickerson Jan 2000

G00-1417 Site Preparation: Key To Successful Conservation Tree Planting In Western Nebraska (Revised February 2002), Doak Nickerson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Establishing a conservation tree planting can be a challenge in semiarid regions like western Nebraska, where annual precipitation of 20 inches or less is the norm. Tree planting failure commonly occurs as a result of poor site preparation coupled with inadequate weed and grass control the first three to five years after planting. Effective site preparation begins the year before planting. The results help young trees survive and grow in several ways. This NebGuide explains when and how to do site preparation for conservation tree planting in Western Nebraska.


G99-1395 Soybean Seeding Rates, Roger Wesley Elmore, James E. Specht Jan 1999

G99-1395 Soybean Seeding Rates, Roger Wesley Elmore, James E. Specht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Recommended soybean seeding rates, stand assessment and replanting rates based on Nebraska field research are addressed in this NebGuide. The soybean stand looked horrible late that May. The field had a good seed bed at planting, but rain after planting crusted the soil over the seed furrows. Rain was in the short-term forecast. All other row crops were planted and looked fine, but this field concerned the producer.


G96-1362 Soil Temperatures And Spring Planting Dates, Steven J. Meyer, Allen L. Dutcher Jan 1998

G96-1362 Soil Temperatures And Spring Planting Dates, Steven J. Meyer, Allen L. Dutcher

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Dates on which soil temperatures reach a threshold value are presented as a spring planting guide for agronomic and horticultural producers.

For a seed to germinate it must have good contact with the soil and be placed in a favorable soil environment. A good soil environment is one that has suitable soil temperature, adequate soil moisture, good aeration, and for certain seeds, light. Conditions necessary for germination depend on the species and variety of seed being planted. Alone, none of these factors guarantee germination; rather it is the interaction of these factors that affects seed germination.

In Nebraska, soil moisture ...


G98-1354 Irrigating Corn, Brian Benham Jan 1998

G98-1354 Irrigating Corn, Brian Benham

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses corn irrigation strategies options and objectives.

There are over 16 million acres in harvested row crop production in Nebraska. About 8 million of these acres are irrigated. Corn occupies approximately 70 percent of the irrigated acreage, or 5.6 million acres. Given this, improving irrigation management on corn production can have significant positive impacts on the quantity and quality of Nebraska's most precious resource: water.


G98-1372 Management Recommendations For Blocked-End Furrow Irrigation, Dean E. Eisenhauer, Brian L. Benham Jan 1998

G98-1372 Management Recommendations For Blocked-End Furrow Irrigation, Dean E. Eisenhauer, Brian L. Benham

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Proper blocked-end furrow irrigation management practices can minimize water application, irrigation costs and the leaching of agri-chemicals below the root zone.

The goal of every irrigator should be to apply the right amount of water uniformly to meet crop needs. To do this, irrigators need to know how much water is applied and where it goes. In other words, they need to know how uniformly the irrigation water infiltrates into the soil profile. Achieving a uniform water application is not easy when using furrow irrigation. However, with a better understanding of how irrigation system management affects water distribution and a ...


G98-1370 Abandonment Planning For Earthen Manure Storages, Holding Ponds And Anaerobic Lagoons, Richard K. Koelsch Jan 1998

G98-1370 Abandonment Planning For Earthen Manure Storages, Holding Ponds And Anaerobic Lagoons, Richard K. Koelsch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The purpose of this NebGuide is to define some critical issues to be addressed by an abandonment plan of an earthen manure storage, anaerobic lagoon or runoff holding pond.

A Nebraska construction permit for a Livestock Waste Control Facility (LWCF) requires a written plan defining possible abandonment procedures in the event the operation (and associated LWCF) is discontinued. The plan must be approved by the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) prior to permit issuance.


G98-1356 Polyacrylamide – A Method To Reduce Soil Erosion, C. Dean Yonts, Brian Benham Jan 1998

G98-1356 Polyacrylamide – A Method To Reduce Soil Erosion, C. Dean Yonts, Brian Benham

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes polyacrylamide, what it is, how it can be used to reduce soil erosion due to, irrigation and what water management changes must be considered.

Topsoil loss can mean a long-term reduction in soil productivity, crop yield and the life expectancy of downstream storage reservoirs. In the short term, producers are faced with reuse pits to clean or a buildup of soil at the lower ends of fields which must be redistributed. Measures must be taken to reduce or eliminate soil erosion and sustain Nebraska's soil resource.


Ec98-787 Glossary Of Ecosystem Terms, Thomas G. Franti, R. Herpel, G.R. Lingle Jan 1998

Ec98-787 Glossary Of Ecosystem Terms, Thomas G. Franti, R. Herpel, G.R. Lingle

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This extension circular contains ecosystem definitions from abiotic to wildlife refuge.


G97-1319 Management Of Smooth Sumac On Grasslands, John Ortmann, Katherine L. Miles, James L. Stubbendieck, Walter H. Schacht Jan 1997

G97-1319 Management Of Smooth Sumac On Grasslands, John Ortmann, Katherine L. Miles, James L. Stubbendieck, Walter H. Schacht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The herbicide 2,4-D LV4 ester provides excellent low-cost smooth sumac control. Prescribed burning before herbicide application does not substantially improve sumac control, but may ease herbicide application and provide other benefits.

Smooth sumac (Rhus glabra L.) is a native deciduous shrub that forms dense thickets from widely spreading roots. It is found in the Sandhills, mixed-grass, and tallgrass areas throughout Nebraska. Introduced cool-season grasses, such as Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.), invade the thickets, and production of desirable forage species is reduced below the dense canopies. Trees and other shrubs readily establish in aging sumac thickets, accelerating the conversion ...


Ec97-2506 A Place In The Country: The Acreage Owner's Guide, Gary C. Bergman, Corey Brubaker, Kathleen J. Cue, Dennis M. Ferraro, Keith Glewen, Donald E. Janssen, Kevin Kock, Richard J. Lodes, Barbara P. Ogg, Jim Peterson, Warder Shires, Sharon Skipton, Monte Stauffer, David L. Varner Jan 1997

Ec97-2506 A Place In The Country: The Acreage Owner's Guide, Gary C. Bergman, Corey Brubaker, Kathleen J. Cue, Dennis M. Ferraro, Keith Glewen, Donald E. Janssen, Kevin Kock, Richard J. Lodes, Barbara P. Ogg, Jim Peterson, Warder Shires, Sharon Skipton, Monte Stauffer, David L. Varner

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A special place in the country is often a long-awaited dream. For many it communicates freedom, open space, clean air and unique opportunities to enjoy hobbies, nature and quiet living at its best. Making this a reality not only requires a major financial investment, it also requires careful planning and assessment of the existing property or new homesite under consideration.

This extension circular helps you as an acreage owner make the right decisions when living in the country.


Nf96-249 Nitrogen Application Practices In Nebraska, William Miller, Ray Supalla, Benedict Juliano Jan 1996

Nf96-249 Nitrogen Application Practices In Nebraska, William Miller, Ray Supalla, Benedict Juliano

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses nitrogen application among Nebraska farmers.


Nf96-248 Factors Considered To Decide Nitrogen Application Rate, William Miller, Ray Supalla, Benedict Juliano Jan 1996

Nf96-248 Factors Considered To Decide Nitrogen Application Rate, William Miller, Ray Supalla, Benedict Juliano

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses nitrogen application among Nebraska farmers.


Nf96-290 Irrigation Management Practices In Nebraska, William Miller, Ray Supalla, Benedict Juliano Jan 1996

Nf96-290 Irrigation Management Practices In Nebraska, William Miller, Ray Supalla, Benedict Juliano

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has information on a variety of new irrigation practices.


G95-1241 Annual Broadleaf Weed Control In Winter Wheat (Revised January 1999), Gail` A. Wicks, Robert N. Klein, Alex Martin, Drew J. Lyon Jan 1995

G95-1241 Annual Broadleaf Weed Control In Winter Wheat (Revised January 1999), Gail` A. Wicks, Robert N. Klein, Alex Martin, Drew J. Lyon

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide discusses preventive, cultural, and chemical weed control in winter wheat. The best weed control is obtained by using a combination of these methods. Winter and summer annual broadleaf weeds have an important economic impact on Nebraska winter wheat. They compete with winter wheat for water, light, space, and nutrients, reducing Nebraska winter wheat yields by an estimated 10 percent each year. The dollar loss, with wheat at $2.50 per bushel, is over $2.1 million per year. Weeds also slow harvest and increase combine repair costs. Producers may be docked at the elevator for excessive grain moisture ...


Nf95-243 Soil Compaction Tips, Alice J. Jones Jan 1995

Nf95-243 Soil Compaction Tips, Alice J. Jones

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact offers 50 tips to prevent soil compaction.


G95-1260 Fate Of Insecticides Used For Termite Control In Soil, Shripat T. Kamble Jan 1995

G95-1260 Fate Of Insecticides Used For Termite Control In Soil, Shripat T. Kamble

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides information on effects of soil and chemical properties affecting behavior of termiticides in soil.

Termites cause substantial damage to residential and commercial buildings in the United States. It has been estimated that the annual cost for controlling termites and repairing their damage in the United States exceeds $1.7 billion. Subterranean termites, the most destructive of all termites, account for 95 percent of this damage.


Ec95-141 Nebraska's Manure Resource, D. H. Sander, J.E. Power, B. Eghball Jan 1995

Ec95-141 Nebraska's Manure Resource, D. H. Sander, J.E. Power, B. Eghball

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Manure is a valuable resource that is sometimes perceived as a liability. For centuries, manure has provided needed nutrients which increased and stabilized food production. With the advent of inorganic chemical fertilizers, the value of manure as a nutrient source decreased because hauling and spreading costs were higher than the cost of chemical feritlizers. In addition, the water content of manure is high and even when the water is removed, its nutrient content is low compared to chemical fertilizers. Therefore, manure has often been viewed in American agriculture as a "waste" to be disposed of rather than a resource to ...


Ec94-1772 Windbreaks In Sustainable Agricultural Systems, James R. Brandle, Teresa Boes, Vernon Quam, John Gardner Jan 1994

Ec94-1772 Windbreaks In Sustainable Agricultural Systems, James R. Brandle, Teresa Boes, Vernon Quam, John Gardner

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sustainable agriculture is a system of whole-farm resource use balanced with whole-farm productivity. The overall level of productivity achieved is dependent upon the ability to coordinate and manage simultaneously the soil, water, plant, and animal resources within climatic and economic limits. Both the kind and amount of plants and animals supported by the system are important and play significant roles, both individually and collectively in maintaining a healthy farm environment. In the future, integrated systems will help reduce human impact on resources while providing sufficient supplies of high quality food and fiber.

Windbreaks provide protection for people, animals, buildings, crops ...


Nf94-162 Clostridium Botulinum, Susan S. Sumner, Julie A. Albrecht Jan 1994

Nf94-162 Clostridium Botulinum, Susan S. Sumner, Julie A. Albrecht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses a toxin produced by the bacteria Clostridium botulinum.