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Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec05-1894 Dry Bean Disease Profiles Ii: Fungal Root Rot And Wilt Diseases, Robert M. Harveson, John E. Watkins, Loren J. Giesler, Jennifer L. Chaky Jan 2005

Ec05-1894 Dry Bean Disease Profiles Ii: Fungal Root Rot And Wilt Diseases, Robert M. Harveson, John E. Watkins, Loren J. Giesler, Jennifer L. Chaky

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, 4-color publications profiles the fungal root rot and wilt diseases and symptoms of dry bean. These diseases include: fusarium root rot, rhizoctonia root rot, pythium root rot, fusariuim yellows, and white mold.


Ec05-1893 Dry Bean Disease Profiles I: Foliar And Bacterial Diseases, Robert M. Harveson, John E. Watkins, Loren J. Giesler, Jnenifer L. Chaky Jan 2005

Ec05-1893 Dry Bean Disease Profiles I: Foliar And Bacterial Diseases, Robert M. Harveson, John E. Watkins, Loren J. Giesler, Jnenifer L. Chaky

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, 4-color publications profiles the foliar and bacterial diseases and symptoms of dry bean. Diseases discussed include: bean common mosaic/bean yellow mosaic virus, rust, common blight, halo blight, brown spot, bacterial wilt.


Nf05-652 Soybean Rust Fungicide Use Guidelines For Nebraska, Loren J. Giesler, John A. Wilson, Jennifer M. Rees Jan 2005

Nf05-652 Soybean Rust Fungicide Use Guidelines For Nebraska, Loren J. Giesler, John A. Wilson, Jennifer M. Rees

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

While the impact that soybean rust will have on Nebraska's soybean crop is unknown, producers should be prepared to manage the disease. When soybean rust occurs or is expected to occur shortly in Nebraska, growers can use the decision-aid flow chart on page 2 of this NebFact to determine whether to treat and, if treating, which class of fungicide (chlorothalonil, strobilurin, or triazole) to use.


Nf05-634 Fungicides To Manage Soybean Rust: What Are The Product Differences?, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas J. Weissling Jan 2005

Nf05-634 Fungicides To Manage Soybean Rust: What Are The Product Differences?, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas J. Weissling

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

If Nebraska soybean producers find themselves needing to apply a fungicide for soybean rust this year, it will be important to choose an effective product based on the stage of disease development in the specific field. It will be important for all producers and crop managers to be aware of where soybean rust is being detected to pursue a treatment that provides the maximum return on investment for any fungicides being applied.

This NebFact discusses the fungicides available for Nebraska soybean fields and resistance management issues.


Nf05-633 Soybean Rust: How Great Is The Threat For Nebraska?, Loren J. Giesler Jan 2005

Nf05-633 Soybean Rust: How Great Is The Threat For Nebraska?, Loren J. Giesler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Soybean rust is a serious foliar disease that has caused significant crop losses in other parts of the world. It was first detected in the United States in November 2004 and has since been identified in several southeastern states. The fact that wind-borne spores principally spread soybean rust suggests it will be a seasonal problem in Nebraska.

This NebFact discusses the symptoms, life cycle, host range, potential impact on soybean production, and management of soybean rust in the state of Nebraska.


Nf04-616 Managing Foliar Diseases Of Winter Wheat With Fungicides Treatment Criteria, Profitability And Products, John E. Watkins Jan 2004

Nf04-616 Managing Foliar Diseases Of Winter Wheat With Fungicides Treatment Criteria, Profitability And Products, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The leaf rust, stripe rust, powdery mildew, tan spot, Septoria leaf blotch and occasionally stem rust comprise the primary foliar disease of wheat in the central Great Plains. In southeast and south central Nebraska, leaf and stripe rusts, powdery mildew and Septoria leaf blotch are the most common and important foliar diseases. Tan spot predominates in the dryland wheat-fallow-wheat or ecofallow cropping systems found in the west central, southwest and Panhandle areas of Nebraska.

This NebFact discusses the treatment criteria, profitability of treatment, and the treatment products and timing of managing foliar diseases of winter wheat with fungicides.


Ec04-1891 Residential Turf Diseases Ii, John E. Watkins Jan 2004

Ec04-1891 Residential Turf Diseases Ii, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, 4-color extension circular covers the diseases and symptoms of residential turfgrasses. The diseases include: ascochyta leaf blight, fairy ring, slime mold, stripe smut, pink snow mold, gray show mold, and pythium blight.


Ec04-1890 Residential Turf Disease I, John E. Watkins Jan 2004

Ec04-1890 Residential Turf Disease I, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, 4-color extension circular identifies the disease and symptoms of residential turfgrasses in Nebraska. The list of diseases include: powdery mildew, summer patch, brown patch, rust diseases, dollar spot, leaf spot and melting out, and Curvularia leaf spot and blight.


Nf04-614 Management Program For Powdery Mildew Of Wheat (Revised August 2005), John E. Watkins Jan 2004

Nf04-614 Management Program For Powdery Mildew Of Wheat (Revised August 2005), John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact, Wheat Disease Fact Sheet No. 7, discusses the management program for powdery mildew of wheat. It covers the cause and occurrence, key symptoms, cultural management practices, fungicide treatment programs with a table listing the fungicdes registered for foliar diseases of wheat, and application.


Nf03-587 Management Program To Prevent Smut Diseases Of Wheat (Revised September 2005), John E. Watkins Jan 2003

Nf03-587 Management Program To Prevent Smut Diseases Of Wheat (Revised September 2005), John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact, Wheat Disease Fact Sheet No. 6, discusses the management program to prevent smut diseases of wheat. It covers the cause and occurrence, key symptoms, cultural management practices, fungicide seed treatment program, economic significance, and applications for controlling the smut diseases.


G1507 Summer Patch And Necrotic Ring Spot, John E. Watkins Jan 2003

G1507 Summer Patch And Necrotic Ring Spot, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the causes, predisposing conditions, and symptoms of summer patch and necrotic ring spot, and provides recommendations for their control.

Introduction

Two of the most destructive turfgrass patch diseases are summer patch and necrotic ring spot, both of which are present in Nebraska. The symptoms of necrotic ring spot and summer patch are essentially identical, making it difficult to distinguish the two apart in an affected turf. If the symptoms begin in May, necrotic ring spot is probably the cause; if they begin in July and August, then summer patch is suspect. In Nebraska summer patch is probably ...


Nf03-571 Aspergillus Flavus And Aflatoxins In Corn, Jim Stack, Michael Carlson Jan 2003

Nf03-571 Aspergillus Flavus And Aflatoxins In Corn, Jim Stack, Michael Carlson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The severe weather conditions of the 2002 growing season resulted in an increase in the incidence and severity of aflatoxin contamination of both food grade and feed grade corn in Nebraska.

The mycotoxin called aflatoxin is produced by the grain mold Aspergillus flavus. Not all isolates of A. flavus produced aflatoxin and isolates that are capable of producing aflatoxin do not always synthesize the toxin. Many factors including environmental conditions and host suscepbitility, determine the incidence and severity of grain mold and subsequent mycotoxin contamination.

This NebFact discusses the cause and occurrence of aflatoxin in corn; the effects it has ...


Nf03-570 Fumonisins In Corn, Jim Stack, Michael Carlson Jan 2003

Nf03-570 Fumonisins In Corn, Jim Stack, Michael Carlson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

During the past two years, millers have rejected some Nebraska food grade corn because it was contaminated with the mycotoxin fumonisin. Most of the contaminated samples and the highest levels of contamination were detected in corn from counties in the eastern half of Nebraska.

Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by the grain molds Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium proliferatum. These fungi are commonly found in corn throughout the United States.

This NebFact discusses the cause and occurrence of fumonisin in corn; the effects it has on plants, animals and humans; and management options to minimize fumonisin contamination.


Ec03-181 Alfalfa In Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas E. Hunt, Shripat T. Kamble, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Charles A. Shapiro Jan 2003

Ec03-181 Alfalfa In Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas E. Hunt, Shripat T. Kamble, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Charles A. Shapiro

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Alfalfa is the most important forage crop grown in Nebraska, with over 1,000 acres grown in every county. It has the highest feeding value for livestock and one of the highest yield potentials. Alfalfa can produce more protein per acre than any other crop and can provide all of the protein needed by many livestock as well as supplying large amounts of vitamins, minerals, and energy. Protein of alfalfa. In also covers the cultural practices, insect pests, diseases, weeds that affect alfalfa.


Ec03-1889 Wheat Disease Profiles Ii, John E. Watkins, Robert M. Harveson, Loren J. Giesler, Jennifer L. Chaky Jan 2003

Ec03-1889 Wheat Disease Profiles Ii, John E. Watkins, Robert M. Harveson, Loren J. Giesler, Jennifer L. Chaky

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, 4-color extension circular cover the diseases and symptoms of wheat in Nebraska. The listed diseases include: loose smut, common bunt, stinking smut, erot, black point, take-all, cephalosporium stripe, black chaff, powdery mildew, high plains disease.


Ec03-1888 Ear Rots And Grain Molds Of Corn, James P. Stack, Loren J. Giesler, Robert M. Harveson, John E. Watkins, Jennifer L. Chaky Jan 2003

Ec03-1888 Ear Rots And Grain Molds Of Corn, James P. Stack, Loren J. Giesler, Robert M. Harveson, John E. Watkins, Jennifer L. Chaky

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, 4-color extension circular covers the ear rots and grain molds of corn in Nebraska. The diseases listed include: grain molds, Gibberella ear rot, Fusarium kernel or ear rot, red streak, Penicillium ear rot, Aspergillus ear or kernel rot, blue eye, Diplodia ear rot, and Nigrospora ear rot.


Ec03-1885 Sugar Beet Disease Profiles I: Fungal Root Rots, Robert M. Harveson, James P. Stack, John E. Watkins, Loren J. Giesler, Jennifer L. Chaky Jan 2003

Ec03-1885 Sugar Beet Disease Profiles I: Fungal Root Rots, Robert M. Harveson, James P. Stack, John E. Watkins, Loren J. Giesler, Jennifer L. Chaky

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, 4-color discusses the disease and symptoms of sugarbeet. These diseases include: seedling diseases (Phoma betae, Pythium ultimum, P. aphanidermatum, Rhizoctonia solani, Aphanomyces cochlioides), Aphanomyces root rot (A. cochlioides), Rhizoctonia root rot (R. solani), Pytihum root rot (P. aphanidermatum) and Fusarium yellows (F. oxysporum f. sp. betae).


Ec03-1887 Alfalfa Disease Profiles, Loren J. Giesler, John E. Watkins, James P. Stack, Robert M. Harveson, Jennifer L. Chaky Jan 2003

Ec03-1887 Alfalfa Disease Profiles, Loren J. Giesler, John E. Watkins, James P. Stack, Robert M. Harveson, Jennifer L. Chaky

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, 4-color publications profiles the diseases and symptoms of alfalfa. The diseases discussed here include: rust, anthracnose, stemphylium leaf spot, downy mildew, common leaf spot, spring black stem, summer black stem, stem nematode, seedling blights, phytophthora root rot, alfalfa mosaic, crown rot, verticillium wilt, and violet root rot.


Ec03-1886 Sugar Beet Disease Profiles Ii: Foliar, Viral, And Nematode Diseases, Robert M. Harveson, James P. Stack, John E. Watkins, Loren J. Giesler, Jennifer L. Chaky Jan 2003

Ec03-1886 Sugar Beet Disease Profiles Ii: Foliar, Viral, And Nematode Diseases, Robert M. Harveson, James P. Stack, John E. Watkins, Loren J. Giesler, Jennifer L. Chaky

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, 4-color publication profiles the foliar, viral, and nematode diseases of sugar beet. Diseases and their symptoms discussed are: Rhizomania; Foliar -- Cercospora Leaf Spot, Powdery Mildew, Phoma Leaf Spot, Bacteral Leaf Spot; Beet Curly Top; Beet Soilborne Mosaic; Nematodse; False Root-Knot; Cyst; and Root-Knot.


Nf02-518 Management Of Phytophthora Diseases Of Soybeans, Loren J. Giesler, Jane A. Christensen, Christopher M. Zwiener Jan 2002

Nf02-518 Management Of Phytophthora Diseases Of Soybeans, Loren J. Giesler, Jane A. Christensen, Christopher M. Zwiener

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Phythophthora diseases of soybean, caused by Phytophthora sojae, are present wherever soybeans are grown in Nebraska. The pathogen survives primarily as "resting" spores in the soil or in association with infested crop debris. Symptoms associated with Phytophthora sojae, infections include seed rots, pre- and post-emergence dampin goff of seedlings and stem rot of plants at various growth stages.

Knowledge of the races present in the state and how varieties with different resistance genes have performed in a grower's field is critical to variety selection for maximum profitability.


Nf02-506 Plant Disease Central Web Site, Jim Stack Jan 2002

Nf02-506 Plant Disease Central Web Site, Jim Stack

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Disease is a natural part of every crop production system. This is true for all crop species and for each type of production system; irrigated or rain-fed, conventional or conservation tillage, and continuous or rotational cropping. In any given year, the question is which diseases will occur in Nebraska's field crops and at what incidence and severity.

To help producers, consultants, and other agricultural professionals diagnose and manage field crop diseases in Nebraska, the Plant Disease Central (PDC) web site was developed. The home page includes instructions on navigating the site under the "About This Site" link.

This NebFact ...


Nf02-543 Ascochyta Blight Of Chickpeas, Robert M. Harveson Jan 2002

Nf02-543 Ascochyta Blight Of Chickpeas, Robert M. Harveson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The chickpea (Cicer arietinum) ranks among the world's three most important pulse (legume) crops. It is an important source of protein in many parts of central Asia, Africa and the Mediterranean and among the food legumes, is the most effective in reducing blood ocholesterol levels. The crop is antive to western Asia and the Middle East, and is usually grown as a rainfed cool-weather crop or as a dry climate crop in semi-arid regions.

Although chickpeas are reported to be susceptible to over 50 pathogens, few diseases are currently recognized as significant economic constraints to production. Ascochyta blight caused ...


Nf02-520 Fungicide Spray Schedule For Home Garden Small Fruits, John E. Watkins, Jernnifer L. Chaky Jan 2002

Nf02-520 Fungicide Spray Schedule For Home Garden Small Fruits, John E. Watkins, Jernnifer L. Chaky

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Home grown strawberries, raspberries and grapes are a rewarding experience for the gardener as well as the consumer of the fresh fruits and jellies. If properly managed, these crops can be a source of enjoyment for years. To be successful, however, the home gardener must develop a sound integrated pest management (IPM) approach to controlling diseases and insect pests. A good IPM program makes use of cultural, varietal and chemical means of preventing or reducing disease losses.

This NebFact discusses which fungicides to use for which disease of small garden fruits and provides recommendations for a fungicide treatment schedule.


Nf02-519 Fungicide Spray Schedule For Home Garden Tree Fruits, Jennifer L. Chaky, John E. Watkins Jan 2002

Nf02-519 Fungicide Spray Schedule For Home Garden Tree Fruits, Jennifer L. Chaky, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Growing tree fruits in the home garden can be a very enjoyable experience, and with proper management, can provide many years of enjoyment. Success in growing tree frutis depends on following an approach known as integrated pest management, or IPM. In this management program, variety selection, cultural practices and chemical means are used to prevent or reduce losses due to diseases or insects.

This NebFact covers cultural practices, variety selection, the control of disease problems, and how to correctly use chemical controls for a safer environment.


Nf02-561 Management Program For Common Root Rot And Fusarium Foot Rot (Crown Rot) (Revised September 2005), John E. Watkins Jan 2002

Nf02-561 Management Program For Common Root Rot And Fusarium Foot Rot (Crown Rot) (Revised September 2005), John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact, the Wheat Disease Fact Sheet No. 3 of a series, discusses the cause and occurrence, key symptoms, cultural management practices, fungicide programs, and applications for controlling common root rot and fusarium foot rot (crown rot) of wheat.


Ec01-1880 Diseases Of Nebraska's Field Crops, Loren J. Giesler, Robert M. Harveson, Jim Stack, John E. Watkins, Jennifer L. Chaky Jan 2001

Ec01-1880 Diseases Of Nebraska's Field Crops, Loren J. Giesler, Robert M. Harveson, Jim Stack, John E. Watkins, Jennifer L. Chaky

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Each year, plant diseases are an important factor in reducing yields of Nebraska's field crops. The purpose of this publication is to provide concise information in an easy to use table for many of Nebraska's field crop diseases. The disease information is organized by crop.

Diseases covered in this publication include the four main groups of plant pathogens: fungi, bacteria, viruses, and nematodes.


Nf00-410 Fungicide Options For Managing Foliar Diseases On Wheat, John E. Watkins Jan 2000

Nf00-410 Fungicide Options For Managing Foliar Diseases On Wheat, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Stripe and leaf rusts, tan spot and Septoria leaf blotch comprise the four primary foliar diseases of wheat in the central Great Plains. In eastern and south central Nebraska leaf rust and Septoria leaf blotch are common, and in the wheat-fallow-wheat regions of western Nebraska, tan spot is an important foliar disease. Stripe rust occurs statewide.

This NebFact discusses the options of treatment criteria, profitability of treatment, treatment products and timing for managing foliar diseases of wheat.


Ec99-1877 Damping Off, Root Rots, And Vascular Disorders Of Soybean, Loren J. Giesler Jan 1999

Ec99-1877 Damping Off, Root Rots, And Vascular Disorders Of Soybean, Loren J. Giesler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Soybeans are grown on nearly 4 million acres in Nebraska and are threatened by several diseases, soil-borne fungal diseases being the most common (for growers in the Midwest). Early season damping off and root rots often are followed by premature death, which in many instances is attributed to fungal infections earlier in the growing season causing root and cortical rots and vascular disorders.

This extension circular discusses these diseases, their symptoms and control.


Nf99-397 Gray Leaf Spot Of Perennial Ryegrass In Nebraska, John E. Watkins Jan 1999

Nf99-397 Gray Leaf Spot Of Perennial Ryegrass In Nebraska, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Gray leaf spot, caused by the fungus Pyricularia grisea, was reported in the early 1970s to be a damaging disease of annual ryegrass grown for forage in the southeastern United States. Forage yield losses were so severe that the disease was named ryegrass blast.

This NebFact discusses the diagnosis, future occurrences, and management of gray leaf spot in Nebraska and surrounding states.


Ec98-1876 Foliar And Fruit Diseases Of Cucurbits, Jane A. Christensen, Loren J. Giesler Jan 1998

Ec98-1876 Foliar And Fruit Diseases Of Cucurbits, Jane A. Christensen, Loren J. Giesler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Members of the cucurbit family are well adapted to Nebraska's weather conditions and are grown in both gardens and commercial fields. Cucurbits include cucumbers, squash, melons, gourds, gherkin, vegetable marrow, and pumpkins. They are susceptible to varying degrees to diseases caused by fungi, bacteria and viruses. Accurate disease diagnosis is an essential part of crop management and can help growers attain maximum yields.

This extension circular explains these diseases of cucurbits and how to control them.