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Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec05-705 Precision Agriculture: Site-Specific Of Soil Ph (Faq), Viacheslav I. Adamchuk, Jerry Mulliken Jan 2005

Ec05-705 Precision Agriculture: Site-Specific Of Soil Ph (Faq), Viacheslav I. Adamchuk, Jerry Mulliken

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Site-specific management of soil pH is a precision agriculture practice that can provide positive economic and environmental impacts on modern crop production. This publication addresses several frequently asked questions related to the meaning of soil pH, lime requirement, and quality of data used to prescribe site-specific management of soil pH. What is soil pH? The term “pH” is defined as the negative logarithm of the hydrogen ion activity, and values range from 1 (very acidic) to 14 (very basic).


G05-1579 Using Modified Atmometers (EtGage®) For Irrigation Management, Suat Irmak, Jose O, Payero, Derrel L. Martin Jan 2005

G05-1579 Using Modified Atmometers (EtGage®) For Irrigation Management, Suat Irmak, Jose O, Payero, Derrel L. Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the atmometer (evapotranspiration gage) and explains how it can be used for irrigation scheduling. Examlpes are provided to show how information collected with an atmometer can be used to estimate crop water use for corn and soybean.


Nf599 Wheat Disease Fact Sheet No. 1: Management Program For Rust Diseases Of Wheat, John E. Watkins Jan 2005

Nf599 Wheat Disease Fact Sheet No. 1: Management Program For Rust Diseases Of Wheat, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses rust diseases in wheat and management practices.

Leaf rust, stripe rust and stem rust in wheat occur from mid-May to July. In leaf rust it can occur again in September to October.

Symptoms of leaf rust include oval reddish-orange pustules on leaves; stripe rust symptoms include bright yellow-orange pustules between the veins in stripes; stem rust symptoms include reddish-brown oblong pustules with frayed margins on leaves and stems.

To manage the disease, plant varieties with at least a moderate level of resistence. Select varieties that differ in parantage, maturity and disease reaction. Fungicide can be applied but ...


Ec05-835 Hedging And Basis Considerations For Feeder Cattle Livestock Risk Protection Insurance, Darrell R. Mark Jan 2005

Ec05-835 Hedging And Basis Considerations For Feeder Cattle Livestock Risk Protection Insurance, Darrell R. Mark

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) Insurance for feeder cattle is a price-risk management tool available to feeder cattle producers with cattle in Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. LRP indemnifies against declines in feeder cattle sales prices, as determined by the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) Feeder Cattle Can Index, which represents a national average cash feeder steer price.

This extension circular examines historical LRP basis and demonstrates its use in hedgling with LRP.


Nf05-634 Fungicides To Manage Soybean Rust: What Are The Product Differences?, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas J. Weissling Jan 2005

Nf05-634 Fungicides To Manage Soybean Rust: What Are The Product Differences?, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas J. Weissling

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

If Nebraska soybean producers find themselves needing to apply a fungicide for soybean rust this year, it will be important to choose an effective product based on the stage of disease development in the specific field. It will be important for all producers and crop managers to be aware of where soybean rust is being detected to pursue a treatment that provides the maximum return on investment for any fungicides being applied.

This NebFact discusses the fungicides available for Nebraska soybean fields and resistance management issues.


Nf05-633 Soybean Rust: How Great Is The Threat For Nebraska?, Loren J. Giesler Jan 2005

Nf05-633 Soybean Rust: How Great Is The Threat For Nebraska?, Loren J. Giesler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Soybean rust is a serious foliar disease that has caused significant crop losses in other parts of the world. It was first detected in the United States in November 2004 and has since been identified in several southeastern states. The fact that wind-borne spores principally spread soybean rust suggests it will be a seasonal problem in Nebraska.

This NebFact discusses the symptoms, life cycle, host range, potential impact on soybean production, and management of soybean rust in the state of Nebraska.


Nf04-597 Biosecurity And The Poultry Flock, Dan Mcguire, Sheila Scheideler Jan 2004

Nf04-597 Biosecurity And The Poultry Flock, Dan Mcguire, Sheila Scheideler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

What is Biosecurity? Biosecurity is a modern term created out of a need to protect, in our case poultry, from an intentional or unintentional threat from a biological agent. In our everyday management, biosecurity is an endless endeavor to keep viral disease agents and/or the spread of such disease agents at bay. We have learned from our own personal welfare that by keeping our environment clean, i.e., "cleanliness is next to godliness" and by reducing contact with infected people or animals, i.e., "being a good neighbor," we can reduce our chance of catching or spreading disease. This ...


Nf04-599 Soybean Aphid Management In Nebraska, Thomas E. Hunt Jan 2004

Nf04-599 Soybean Aphid Management In Nebraska, Thomas E. Hunt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) is Nebraska's newest soybean insect pests, arriving in the United States in 2000 and in Nebraska in 2002. Yield losses of over 20 percent have been documented in some northeast Nebraska fields.

This NebFact covers the description, initial observations, life cycle and injury, and management of the soybean aphid in Nebraska.


Ec03-702 Precision Agriculture: Applications Of Remote Sensing In Site-Specific Management, Viacheslav I. Adamchuk, Richard L. Perk, James S. Schepers Jan 2003

Ec03-702 Precision Agriculture: Applications Of Remote Sensing In Site-Specific Management, Viacheslav I. Adamchuk, Richard L. Perk, James S. Schepers

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Precision farming is an emerging agricultural technology that involves managing each crop input on a site-specific basis to reduce waste, increase profits, and maintain the quality of the environment. Remote sensing is a technology that can be used to obtain various spatial layers of information about soil and crop conditions. It allows detection and/or characterization of an object, series of objects, or landscape without having the sensor in physical contact.


G03-1504 Lime Use For Soil Acidity Management, Martha Mamo, Charles S. Wortmann, Charles A. Shapiro Jan 2003

G03-1504 Lime Use For Soil Acidity Management, Martha Mamo, Charles S. Wortmann, Charles A. Shapiro

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Soil acidity can reduce crop production by directly affecting roots and changing the availability of essential nutrients and toxic elements. Liming can neutralize soil acidity, but several factors can affect the economic benefits of liming. With continuous cropping, soil pH can decrease (i.e., increase in acidity) because of various factors, including crop removal and leaching of basic cations, application of ammoniabased nitrogen fertilizers, and organic matter decomposition. Adding lime or other materials can raise soil pH to the ideal range for crop production, create an environment for a healthy function of microbes, and increase the levels of calcium or ...


Nf02-518 Management Of Phytophthora Diseases Of Soybeans, Loren J. Giesler, Jane A. Christensen, Christopher M. Zwiener Jan 2002

Nf02-518 Management Of Phytophthora Diseases Of Soybeans, Loren J. Giesler, Jane A. Christensen, Christopher M. Zwiener

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Phythophthora diseases of soybean, caused by Phytophthora sojae, are present wherever soybeans are grown in Nebraska. The pathogen survives primarily as "resting" spores in the soil or in association with infested crop debris. Symptoms associated with Phytophthora sojae, infections include seed rots, pre- and post-emergence dampin goff of seedlings and stem rot of plants at various growth stages.

Knowledge of the races present in the state and how varieties with different resistance genes have performed in a grower's field is critical to variety selection for maximum profitability.


Nf02-519 Fungicide Spray Schedule For Home Garden Tree Fruits, Jennifer L. Chaky, John E. Watkins Jan 2002

Nf02-519 Fungicide Spray Schedule For Home Garden Tree Fruits, Jennifer L. Chaky, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Growing tree fruits in the home garden can be a very enjoyable experience, and with proper management, can provide many years of enjoyment. Success in growing tree frutis depends on following an approach known as integrated pest management, or IPM. In this management program, variety selection, cultural practices and chemical means are used to prevent or reduce losses due to diseases or insects.

This NebFact covers cultural practices, variety selection, the control of disease problems, and how to correctly use chemical controls for a safer environment.


Ec02-1550 Nebraska Management Guide For Arthropod Pests Of Livestock And Horses, John B. Campbell Jan 2002

Ec02-1550 Nebraska Management Guide For Arthropod Pests Of Livestock And Horses, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Understanding the differences in insecticide formulations is important to selecting the right one for the job. This publication discusses the different insecticides and ways of treating your animals. They include: dusts, emulsifiable concentrates, emulsifiable livestock insecticides, flowables (thick fluids mixed with water), soluble powders, wettable powders, and water dispersible liquids. Insecticides listed in this publication are considered safe when used according to label directions.


G02-1465 Crop Water Use In Western Nebraska, C. Dean Yonts Jan 2002

G02-1465 Crop Water Use In Western Nebraska, C. Dean Yonts

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Whether your water originates from the ground or the river, water for irrigation is becoming limited due to diminishing supplies and increasing environmental needs. In many areas of the Nebraska Panhandle, groundwater levels are dropping due to over development of the aquifers. In river valleys, water shortages occur during periods of drought.

This NebGuide provides information on average weekly crop water use values for the major crops grown in western Nebraska. The information is best used for planning decisions before the season begins or for long term irrigation system planning.


G02-1466 Determining The Need To Fertilize Landscape Trees And Shrubs (Revised March 2004), Scott J. Dewald, Steven D. Rasmussen, Charles A. Shapiro, Scott J. Josiah Jan 2002

G02-1466 Determining The Need To Fertilize Landscape Trees And Shrubs (Revised March 2004), Scott J. Dewald, Steven D. Rasmussen, Charles A. Shapiro, Scott J. Josiah

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Most Nebraska soils are fertile enough to support tree and shrub growth without applying fertilizer. However, when woody plants exhibit poor growth or reduced vigor, yet have had adequate moisture and are not experiencing pest problems or other environmental limitations, the proper applicatin of fertilizer may be necessary. This NebGuide explains how to determine if fertilization of established trees and shrubs is required and how to apply the needed amount.


Nf02-551 Management Of Blister Beetles In Alfalfa, John B. Campbell, Steve Ensley Jan 2002

Nf02-551 Management Of Blister Beetles In Alfalfa, John B. Campbell, Steve Ensley

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Adult blister beetles (Epicauta spp.) tend to be gregarious, and several may be observed feeding on the same flowering plant such as alfalfa or sometimes soybeans, goldenrod or occasionally musk thistle, They feed primarily on leaves and flowers but do little damage to crops.

This NebFact discusses the life cycle, damage, treatment, and prevention avoidance of the blister beetle here in Nebraska.


Ec01-158 Integrating Management Objectives And Grazing Strategies On Semi-Arid Rangeland, Patrick E. Reece, Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht Jan 2001

Ec01-158 Integrating Management Objectives And Grazing Strategies On Semi-Arid Rangeland, Patrick E. Reece, Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Rangelands account for about half of Nebraska's total land area or about 24 million acres. Much of these expansive natural resource areas are in the semi-arid climatic region of Nebraska where grazing management decisions have a profound effect on ranch survival.

The educational object of this circular is to explain management practices that optimize the sustainability of rangeland-based enterprises. Additionally a decision-support tool is provided for selecting grazing systems best suited to livestock production and natural resource management objectives.


G01-1433, Environmental Stresses And Tree Health, Jon S. Wilson, Mark O. Harrell Jan 2001

G01-1433, Environmental Stresses And Tree Health, Jon S. Wilson, Mark O. Harrell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Environmental stresses cause many health problems in Nebraska trees. Hot and cold temperatures, drying winds, poor soil and root conditions and human activity can damage leaves, bark and roots, and can predispose trees to secondary insect and disease attack. Keeping a tree in good condition through proper maintenance can prevent many environmentally related health problems.

This NebGuide is intended to help tree owners identify tree health problems caused by environmental stresses and provide ways to prevent or reduce damage.


G00-1778 Field Windbreaks, James R. Brandle, Laurie Hodges Jan 2000

G00-1778 Field Windbreaks, James R. Brandle, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

gricultural producers face many challenges as they try to balance efficient production systems with increasing environmental demands. For these systems to be successful, they must optimize the balance between inputs and final production. Field windbreaks are one way to increase yields while at the same time reducing inputs and improving both environmental quality and production efficiency. Windbreaks reduce wind speed and alter the microclimate in sheltered areas. Field windbreaks reduce wind erosion and the damage to crops caused by wind-blown soil. They improve water use efficiency, reduce risks associated with drought, and manage blowing snow.

Field windbreaks provide positive economic ...


Nf00-445 Creating A Strong Family: Successful Management Of Stress And Crisis, John Defrain Jan 2000

Nf00-445 Creating A Strong Family: Successful Management Of Stress And Crisis, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Research with strong families shows how they approach difficult times and overcome them.


Nf00-425 Resistance Management For European Corn Borer And Bt Transgenic Corn: Refuge Design And Placement (Revised October 2002), Thomas E. Hunt, G.W. Echtenkamp Jan 2000

Nf00-425 Resistance Management For European Corn Borer And Bt Transgenic Corn: Refuge Design And Placement (Revised October 2002), Thomas E. Hunt, G.W. Echtenkamp

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

One of the key issues surrounding the use of Bt transgenic corn hybrids is resistance management. These corn hybrids have been engineered to produce a version of the insecticidal protein from the naturally occurring soil bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), that is toxic to European corn borers and a few other insects.

This NebFact discusses the important principles of resistance management for European corn borer and Bt corn and refuge considerations.


Ec99-1563 Corn Rootworm Management, Robert J. Wright, Lance J. Meinke, Keith J. Jarvi Jan 1999

Ec99-1563 Corn Rootworm Management, Robert J. Wright, Lance J. Meinke, Keith J. Jarvi

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Corn rootworms (Diabrotica spp.) are one of the most economically important corn insects in Nebraska. The western corn rootworm, D. virgifera virgifera LeConte, and the northern corn rootworm, D. barberi Smith and Lawrence, are the most economically important rootworm species in Nebraska. A third species, the southern corn rootworm, D. undecimpunctata howardi Barber, causes little economic damage to corn and has not been shown to overwinter in Nebraska. This publication will focus on the biology and management of the western and northern corn rootworms.


G99-1384 Gray Leaf Spot Of Corn, James Stack Jan 1999

G99-1384 Gray Leaf Spot Of Corn, James Stack

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

All corn hybrids and inbreds are susceptible to gray leaf spot in varying degrees. This NebGuide discusses the symptoms, impacts and management of this disease.

Corn is grown throughout Nebraska on over 8 million acres of land; approximately 5 million acres are irrigated. The market is segmented into seed corn, field corn and specialty corns (e.g., high oil, high amylose and white corn). Field corn represents the largest portion of the acreage grown. To varying degrees, all corn hybrids and inbreds are susceptible to gray leaf spot disease.

Gray leaf spot is a significant disease worldwide. It has been ...


G99-1385 Common Stalk Rot Diseases Of Corn, James Stack Jan 1999

G99-1385 Common Stalk Rot Diseases Of Corn, James Stack

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Corn stalk rot diseases occur every year in every field to some extent. This NebGuide discusses the symptoms, impacts and management of these diseases.

Corn is grown throughout Nebraska on over 8 million acres of land; approximately 5 million acres are irrigated. Seed corn, field corn and specialty corns (e.g., high oil, high amylose and white corn) comprise the three main corn production systems. Field corn is grown on the most acreage. Whether grown in an irrigated or dryland production system, all corn hybrids are susceptible to a variety of stalk rot diseases. These diseases occur every year in ...


Nf99-403 Livestock Waste Management Act (Revised March 2001), J. David Aiken Jan 1999

Nf99-403 Livestock Waste Management Act (Revised March 2001), J. David Aiken

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The Livestock Waste Management Act requires all livestock operations with 300 animal units or more to be inspected by the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to determine whether livestock wastes contaminate surface or ground water. This NebFact discusses the following parts of the Livestock Waste Management Act: Act (how cited); Terms (defined); Livestock operation, exemption, livestock waste control facility, permit, restriction; Construction permit or operating permit (when required), livestock waste control facilities, classification, restrictions; Section (how construed); Cold water class A streams (designation); Permit (acknowledgment required); Livestock operation (request inspection, when, fees, department, duties); Permits (duration, modification); Permit (application ...


Nf99-397 Gray Leaf Spot Of Perennial Ryegrass In Nebraska, John E. Watkins Jan 1999

Nf99-397 Gray Leaf Spot Of Perennial Ryegrass In Nebraska, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Gray leaf spot, caused by the fungus Pyricularia grisea, was reported in the early 1970s to be a damaging disease of annual ryegrass grown for forage in the southeastern United States. Forage yield losses were so severe that the disease was named ryegrass blast.

This NebFact discusses the diagnosis, future occurrences, and management of gray leaf spot in Nebraska and surrounding states.


Nf98-381 So Where Do I Put That $2,000?, Kathy Prochaska-Cue Jan 1998

Nf98-381 So Where Do I Put That $2,000?, Kathy Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact provides an estimation for retirement financial planning.


Nf98-380 Where Am I Going To Find $2,000 To Save?, Kathy Prochaska-Cue Jan 1998

Nf98-380 Where Am I Going To Find $2,000 To Save?, Kathy Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact provides an estimation for retirement financial planning.


Nf98-379 Ballpark Estimate Of Retirement Financial Needs, Kathy Prochaska-Cue Jan 1998

Nf98-379 Ballpark Estimate Of Retirement Financial Needs, Kathy Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact provides an estimation for retirement financial planning.


Ec98-148 Grassland Management With Prescribed Fire, John Ortmann, Daniel D. Beran, Robert A. Masters, James L. Stubbendieck Jan 1998

Ec98-148 Grassland Management With Prescribed Fire, John Ortmann, Daniel D. Beran, Robert A. Masters, James L. Stubbendieck

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular provides an overview of the use of fire in grassland management. It describes the history and importance of fire in the grassland ecosystem, how plants respond to fire, and the uses and potential benefits of prescribed fire. It also summarizes fire planning, and legal and safety considerations. And finally, it provides guidance on some special uses of fire.