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Ec05-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, 1960-2005, Darrell R. Mark, Dillon Feuz, Brad Heinrichs Jan 2005

Ec05-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, 1960-2005, Darrell R. Mark, Dillon Feuz, Brad Heinrichs

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This report contains historical price data for the major crops and livestock commodities produced in Nebraska. Prices received by producers are reported for 1960-2005 for most of the commodities.

The data was compiled from Nebraska Agricultural Statistics Service and Agricultural Prices, National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA; Oil Crops Situation and Outlook, Economic Research Service, USDA; Cotton and Wool Outlook, Economic Research Service, USDA; and Livestock and Grain Market News, Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. Sources of prices for each commodity are indicated on the tables.


Ec05-835 Hedging And Basis Considerations For Feeder Cattle Livestock Risk Protection Insurance, Darrell R. Mark Jan 2005

Ec05-835 Hedging And Basis Considerations For Feeder Cattle Livestock Risk Protection Insurance, Darrell R. Mark

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) Insurance for feeder cattle is a price-risk management tool available to feeder cattle producers with cattle in Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. LRP indemnifies against declines in feeder cattle sales prices, as determined by the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) Feeder Cattle Can Index, which represents a national average cash feeder steer price.

This extension circular examines historical LRP basis and demonstrates its use in hedgling with LRP.


G05-1576 Safe Use Of Animal Medicines, Arden Wohlers, David R. Smith, Dicky D. Griffin Jan 2005

G05-1576 Safe Use Of Animal Medicines, Arden Wohlers, David R. Smith, Dicky D. Griffin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide promotes exercising caution while working with livestock medications.

Veterinary drugs, including antibiotics, antiparasite medications and vaccines, play an important role in the control and prevention of disease in all livestock. However, there is risk when working with animals and animal medicines. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have strict rules regulating the prescription, distribution and use of animal medications and chemicals. Regulations on how a drug is stored, administered, and disposed of ensure product safety to the producer, animal, consumer and environment.


Ec04-835 Hedging And Basis Considerations For Feeder Cattle Livestock Risk Protection Insurance, Darrell R. Mark Jan 2004

Ec04-835 Hedging And Basis Considerations For Feeder Cattle Livestock Risk Protection Insurance, Darrell R. Mark

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) insurnace for feeder cattle is a price-risk management tool initially offered in June 2003 to feeder cattle producers in Nebraska, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Nevada, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming.

This extension circular examines historical LRP basia dn demonstrates its use in hedging with LRP.


Ec03-181 Alfalfa In Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas E. Hunt, Shripat T. Kamble, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Charles A. Shapiro Jan 2003

Ec03-181 Alfalfa In Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas E. Hunt, Shripat T. Kamble, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Charles A. Shapiro

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Alfalfa is the most important forage crop grown in Nebraska, with over 1,000 acres grown in every county. It has the highest feeding value for livestock and one of the highest yield potentials. Alfalfa can produce more protein per acre than any other crop and can provide all of the protein needed by many livestock as well as supplying large amounts of vitamins, minerals, and energy. Protein of alfalfa. In also covers the cultural practices, insect pests, diseases, weeds that affect alfalfa.


Ec03-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, 1960-2003, Darrell R. Mark, Dillon Feuz, Roger Selley, Tina N. Barrett Jan 2003

Ec03-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, 1960-2003, Darrell R. Mark, Dillon Feuz, Roger Selley, Tina N. Barrett

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This report contains historical price data for the major crops and livestock commodities produced in Nebraska. Prices received by producers are reported for 1960-2002 for most of the commodities.

The data was compiled from Nebraska Agricultural Statistics Services and Agricultural Prices, National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA; Oil Crops Situation and Outlook, Economic Research Service, USDA; Cotton and Wool Outlook, Economic Research Service, USDA; and Livestock and Grain Market News, Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. Sources of prices for each commodity are indicated on the tables.


G03-1527 Annual Forages For The Nebraska Panhandle, Burt A. Weichenthal, David D. Baltensperger, K. P. Vogel, S. D. Masterson, J.M. Blumenthal, J.M. Krall Jan 2003

G03-1527 Annual Forages For The Nebraska Panhandle, Burt A. Weichenthal, David D. Baltensperger, K. P. Vogel, S. D. Masterson, J.M. Blumenthal, J.M. Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Annual forages have value as pasture, green chop, silage, and hay. With adequate soil moisture, these forages grow very rapidly during their appropriate growing seasons. Advantages and disadvantages of various annual forages, results of dryland and irrigated forage trials, tips for achieving quality forage, and issues related to animal health and feeding forages are discussed in this NebGuide.


Ec02-1763 How Windbreaks Work, James R. Brandle, Laurie Hodges, Xinhua Zhou Jan 2002

Ec02-1763 How Windbreaks Work, James R. Brandle, Laurie Hodges, Xinhua Zhou

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Windbreaks are barriers used to reduce and redirect wind. They usually consist of trees and shrubs but also may be perennial or annual crops and grasses, fences, or other materials. The reduction in wind speed behind a windbreak modifies the environmental conditions or microclimate in this sheltered zone.


Ec830 Costs Of Cattle Fencing For Grazing Areas, Roger K. Wilson, Richard T. Clark Jan 2002

Ec830 Costs Of Cattle Fencing For Grazing Areas, Roger K. Wilson, Richard T. Clark

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Information, data tables and worksheet to help estimate the cost of cattle fencing for grazing areas.

Discussion of fencing options and related costs for cattle in grazing areas. Fence contractors across the state were surveyed in 2002 to determine approximate costs for various scenarios. A worksheet can help an individual estimate the cost of the fencing system being considered.


G02-1444 Medical Sharps Disposal From Livestock Operations, Dicky D. Griffin, Marilyn Buhman Jan 2002

G02-1444 Medical Sharps Disposal From Livestock Operations, Dicky D. Griffin, Marilyn Buhman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide explains how to properly dispose of medical sharps (hypodermic needles and scalpel blades) for livestock operations. Understanding this is critical for employee safety and environmental stewardship.

Disposing livestock medical sharps presents two concerns. The first is human safety. Handling livestock medical sharps presents a potential employee safety concern and as such is addressed within the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations. Second, the disposal of livestock medical sharps presents an environmental hazard and as such is addressed within the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations.


Ec02-1550 Nebraska Management Guide For Arthropod Pests Of Livestock And Horses, John B. Campbell Jan 2002

Ec02-1550 Nebraska Management Guide For Arthropod Pests Of Livestock And Horses, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Understanding the differences in insecticide formulations is important to selecting the right one for the job. This publication discusses the different insecticides and ways of treating your animals. They include: dusts, emulsifiable concentrates, emulsifiable livestock insecticides, flowables (thick fluids mixed with water), soluble powders, wettable powders, and water dispersible liquids. Insecticides listed in this publication are considered safe when used according to label directions.


G02-1476 Prairie Dogs And Their Control, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Dallas Virchow, John Hobbs Jan 2002

G02-1476 Prairie Dogs And Their Control, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Dallas Virchow, John Hobbs

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Black-tailed prairie dogs are stocky, burrowing rodents that are members of the squirrel family. They are the only species of prairie dog native to Nebraska and they live across the western three-fourths of the state. They cause problems, however, when they conflict with livestock ranching and other land uses, or cause a threat to human health and safety.

This NebGuide provides information on the life history and legal status of black-tailed prairie dogs and prevention and control of the damage they can cause.


Ec01-158 Integrating Management Objectives And Grazing Strategies On Semi-Arid Rangeland, Patrick E. Reece, Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht Jan 2001

Ec01-158 Integrating Management Objectives And Grazing Strategies On Semi-Arid Rangeland, Patrick E. Reece, Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Rangelands account for about half of Nebraska's total land area or about 24 million acres. Much of these expansive natural resource areas are in the semi-arid climatic region of Nebraska where grazing management decisions have a profound effect on ranch survival.

The educational object of this circular is to explain management practices that optimize the sustainability of rangeland-based enterprises. Additionally a decision-support tool is provided for selecting grazing systems best suited to livestock production and natural resource management objectives.


Ec01-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, Roger Selley, Dillon Feuz, Tina Barrett Jan 2001

Ec01-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, Roger Selley, Dillon Feuz, Tina Barrett

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This report contains historical price data for the major crops and livestock classes produced in Nebraska. Prices received by producers are reported for 1960-2000 or for the period listed in each table heading.

The data was compiled from Nebraska Agricultural Statistics, Nebraska Agricultural Statistics Service and Agricultural Prices, USDA; Livestock, Meat and Wool Market News, Livestock and Grain Market News, Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA; and from Agricultural Statistics Board, National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA. Each table indicates the price source.


Nf01-482 "Banned Mammalian Protein" - What Does It Mean?, Rosie Nold, David R. Smith Jan 2001

Nf01-482 "Banned Mammalian Protein" - What Does It Mean?, Rosie Nold, David R. Smith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

For a number of years, 4-H members exhibiting livestock have signed an Ethics Affidavit and Statement of Disclosure. This disclosure has asked exhibitors to certify that they have not used any non-approved drugs on their animals and that if any approved drugs were used, the withdrawal time had passed. In 2001, an additional statement was added to the affidavits.


Ec00-154 Precision Agriculture: Soil Sampling For Precision Agriculture, Richard B. Ferguson, Gary W. Hergert Jan 2000

Ec00-154 Precision Agriculture: Soil Sampling For Precision Agriculture, Richard B. Ferguson, Gary W. Hergert

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

As various aspects of precision agriculture are implemented in Nebraska, some of the most frequent questions asked by producers, fertilizer dealers and crop consultants relate to soil sampling. Should I soil sample this field on a grid? What grid spacing should I use? How often should I sample? Can I use a yield map to tell where to soil sample? All of these are good questions, but often we do not have definitive answers. Site-specific management research conducted in recent years in Nebraska, however, provides some direction on how to implement a soil sampling program for precision agriculture.


Nf99-401 Nebraska Competitive Livestock Markets Act, J. David Aiken Jan 1999

Nf99-401 Nebraska Competitive Livestock Markets Act, J. David Aiken

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact offers the text of the Nebraska Competitive Livestock Markets Act.


Nf99-403 Livestock Waste Management Act (Revised March 2001), J. David Aiken Jan 1999

Nf99-403 Livestock Waste Management Act (Revised March 2001), J. David Aiken

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The Livestock Waste Management Act requires all livestock operations with 300 animal units or more to be inspected by the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to determine whether livestock wastes contaminate surface or ground water. This NebFact discusses the following parts of the Livestock Waste Management Act: Act (how cited); Terms (defined); Livestock operation, exemption, livestock waste control facility, permit, restriction; Construction permit or operating permit (when required), livestock waste control facilities, classification, restrictions; Section (how construed); Cold water class A streams (designation); Permit (acknowledgment required); Livestock operation (request inspection, when, fees, department, duties); Permits (duration, modification); Permit (application ...


Ec98-754 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 7: Hazardous Materials And Waste Management, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-754 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 7: Hazardous Materials And Waste Management, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Consider the variety of products commonly used in households, on acreages and on farms: paints, solvents, oils, cleaners, wood preservatives, batteries, adhesives, and pesticides. Also consider the amount of these products which goes unused or is thrown away. Some common disposal practices can create an unsafe environment around the home and may contaminate groundwater. Additionally, many of these common disposal practices violate Nebraska law.


Ec98-758 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 11: Land Application Of Manure, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-758 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 11: Land Application Of Manure, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Stewardship of soil and water resources should be a goal of every livestock producer. Management decisions made relative to land application of livestock manure will influence the ability to attain that goal.


G98-1777 Windbreak Renovation, James R. Brandle, Jon Wilson, Craig Stange, Mike Kuhns Jan 1998

G98-1777 Windbreak Renovation, James R. Brandle, Jon Wilson, Craig Stange, Mike Kuhns

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Windbreaks are an integral part of many farms and ranches and provide critical protection for farmsteads, livestock and crops. Unfortunately, many windbreaks planted in the 1930s and 1940s are losing their effectiveness due to age, poor health or neglect. In some cases, the windbreak no longer has the necessary density to provide winter protection. In other cases, overcrowding may have reduced the health and vigor of the windbreak, or the windbreak may have been invaded by aggressive sod-forming grasses such as smooth brome, reducing tree growth. Whatever the reason, many older windbreaks need renovation.


G98-1350 Basics Of Feeding Horses: What To Feed And Why, Kathleen P. Anderson Jan 1998

G98-1350 Basics Of Feeding Horses: What To Feed And Why, Kathleen P. Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the horse's digestive system and appropriate feeding procedures.

Because of the horse's eating habits and digestive system, feeding practices common to other species of livestock often result in severe digestive dysfunction or even death for the horse. In fact, several anatomical peculiarities of the horse's digestive tract predispose horses to digestive disorders such as colic and laminitis even under the best management. Under poor feeding management, the onset of these disorders is almost assured. The objective of feeding management is to provide a ration with balanced nutrition that both maximizes nutrient utilization while minimizing ...


G98-1370 Abandonment Planning For Earthen Manure Storages, Holding Ponds And Anaerobic Lagoons, Richard K. Koelsch Jan 1998

G98-1370 Abandonment Planning For Earthen Manure Storages, Holding Ponds And Anaerobic Lagoons, Richard K. Koelsch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The purpose of this NebGuide is to define some critical issues to be addressed by an abandonment plan of an earthen manure storage, anaerobic lagoon or runoff holding pond.

A Nebraska construction permit for a Livestock Waste Control Facility (LWCF) requires a written plan defining possible abandonment procedures in the event the operation (and associated LWCF) is discontinued. The plan must be approved by the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) prior to permit issuance.


Ec98-750 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 12: Silage Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-750 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 12: Silage Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Silage is an important feed for livestock-based agriculture. When properly harvested and stored, silage poses little or no pollution threat, but improper handling can lead to a significant flow of silage juices (or leachate) from the silo. Leachate is an organic liquid that results from pressure in the silo or from extra water entering the silo. It is usually a problem only when silage is fresh, or just after storage. This loss of leachate represents a loss of nutrient value from the silage.


Ec98-749 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 12: Improving Silage Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-749 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 12: Improving Silage Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Silage is an important feed for livestock-based agriculture. When properly harvested and stored, silage poses little or no pollution threat, but improper handling can lead to a significant flow of silage juices (or leachate) from the silo. Leachate is an organic liquid that results from pressure in the silo or from extra water entering the silo. It is usually a problem only when silage is fresh, or just after storage. This loss of leachate represents a loss of nutrient value from the silage.


Ec98-753 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 7: Improving Hazardous Materials And Waste Management, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-753 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 7: Improving Hazardous Materials And Waste Management, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Waste is inevitable. Things which have been outgrown, broken, replaced, or are just no longer needed add to the waste produced at homes, acreages and around farms. Most of the waste accumulated around the farm, acreage and home is solid waste. Solid waste includes all discarded materials — newspapers, empty paint cans, liquids, gases, pickle jars, orange peelings, leftover food, worn out shoes, junk mail — this list is endless. Some of these solid wastes contain potentially hazardous materials.


Ec98-752 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 9: Livestock Manure Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-752 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 9: Livestock Manure Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Accumulating manure in storage incurs certain risks to the environment and to human and animal health unless appropriate precautions are taken.Manure can contribute nutrients and disease-causing organisms to both surface water and groundwater.


Ec98-751 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 9: Improving Livestock Manure Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-751 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 9: Improving Livestock Manure Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Manure storage is an important manure management option for livestock producers. Stored manure can be applied to the soil when nutrient uptake by crops can be maximized and weather related losses minimized. Preplant applications of manure incorporated into the soil ensures maximum crop nutrient value, while reducing risks of water contamination.


Ec98-757 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 11: Improving Land Application Of Manure, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-757 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 11: Improving Land Application Of Manure, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Resource or waste? Stewardship of soil and water resources should be a goal of every livestock producer. Management decisions made relative to land application of livestock manure will influence the ability to attain that goal. An evaluation of your land application practices should focus on the following question: Is manure a waste or are source?


Ec98-756 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 13: Milking Center Effluent Treatment, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-756 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 13: Milking Center Effluent Treatment, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Milking center effluent is usually considered a dairy sanitation problem. If not properly managed, however, the effluent can contaminate both groundwater and surface water.