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Ec07-103 2007 Fall Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger, Robert N. Klein, Bruce Anderson, Jerry D. Volesky, P. Stephen Baenziger, James Krall Jan 2007

Ec07-103 2007 Fall Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger, Robert N. Klein, Bruce Anderson, Jerry D. Volesky, P. Stephen Baenziger, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The 2006 wheat crop has faced more than the usual number of challenges. Western Nebraska was again faced with shortages of rainfall as well as wheat streak mosaic. Eastern Nebraska fared better, but some places had soil borne mosaic problems. Overall, the state yield was down but becasue of similar problems throughout the Great Plains, the price of wheat has remained strong. This circular is a progress report of variety trials conducted by personnel of the Agronomy Department, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers and their associated agricultural laboratories and the South Central Ag Lab. Conduct of experiments ...


Ec07-101 2007 Spring Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, Bruce Anderson, Robert N. Klein, Richard B. Ferguson, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall Jan 2007

Ec07-101 2007 Spring Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, Bruce Anderson, Robert N. Klein, Richard B. Ferguson, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of variety and hybrid performance tests conducted by the Agronomy/Horticulture Department, the Northeast, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers, the South Central Agricultural Laboratory as part of the University of Nebraska and University of Wyoming at Torrington. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service. The following pages include the results of our variety testing programs for many crop species throughtout the state. We hope you find this information useful as you make hybrid and variety decisions for ...


Ec06-103 Fall Seed Guide, 2007, Lenis Alton Nelson, Robert N. Klein, Bruce Anderson, P. Stephen Baenziger, Jerry Nachtman Jan 2006

Ec06-103 Fall Seed Guide, 2007, Lenis Alton Nelson, Robert N. Klein, Bruce Anderson, P. Stephen Baenziger, Jerry Nachtman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of variety trials conducted by personnel of the Agronomy Department, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers and their associated agricultural laboratories and the South Central Ag Laboratory. Conduct of experiments and publications of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


Ec06-155 Nutrient Management For Agronomic Crops In Nebraska, Richard B. Ferguson Jan 2006

Ec06-155 Nutrient Management For Agronomic Crops In Nebraska, Richard B. Ferguson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraska is blessed with fertile soil and vast supplies of groundwater which combine to create an environment well-suited to the production of corn, wheat, grain sorghum, alfalfa, edible beans, and other agronomic crops used for human or animal consumption.

This manual is a guide to nutrient use from all sources for the production of Nebraska's major agronomic crops: corn, winter wheat, grain sorghum, oats, alfalfa, dry edible beans, soybean, sugar beets, popcorn, sunflower, millet, potatoes, and cool and warm season grasses for hay and pasture. Part I of the manual contains information focusing on basic principles of soil fertility ...


Ec05-130 Guide For Weed Management In Nebraska, Roch E. Gaussoin, Brady F. Kappler, Robert N. Klein, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Drew J. Lyon, Alex Martin, Fred Roeth, Gail A. Wicks, Robert G. Wilson, Robert A. Masters, Patrick J. Shea, Larry D. Schulze Jan 2005

Ec05-130 Guide For Weed Management In Nebraska, Roch E. Gaussoin, Brady F. Kappler, Robert N. Klein, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Drew J. Lyon, Alex Martin, Fred Roeth, Gail A. Wicks, Robert G. Wilson, Robert A. Masters, Patrick J. Shea, Larry D. Schulze

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

One of the major thrusts of all University of Nebraska weed science faculty is the Guide for Weed Management in Nebraska. This guide is not just the work of one or two people, rather it is a joint effort of all the authors to produce a comprehensive, information-packed resource. Each weed science faculty member is responsible for particular sections of the guide. The process of reviewing the current content, checking labels and research data and updating the content can be an extensive process. Each year new herbicide active ingredients and trade names are introduced and figuring out what a herbicide ...


Nf04-607 Growing Scallions (Green Onions) For Market Gardeners, Laurie Hodges Jan 2004

Nf04-607 Growing Scallions (Green Onions) For Market Gardeners, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Growing scallions (green onions) can provide market gardeners with early cash flow and customers with quality increases in storage life, freshness and flavor. Growing quality scallions is easier than growing quality bulb onions simply because they are in the field for a shorter time and bulb formation is not an issue when growing true scallions.

This NebFact discusses choosing and growing scallions from seed, fertilizing, the use of pesticides and herbicides for controlling pests and weeds, and a listing of seeding companies.


Ec03-702 Precision Agriculture: Applications Of Remote Sensing In Site-Specific Management, Viacheslav I. Adamchuk, Richard L. Perk, James S. Schepers Jan 2003

Ec03-702 Precision Agriculture: Applications Of Remote Sensing In Site-Specific Management, Viacheslav I. Adamchuk, Richard L. Perk, James S. Schepers

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Precision farming is an emerging agricultural technology that involves managing each crop input on a site-specific basis to reduce waste, increase profits, and maintain the quality of the environment. Remote sensing is a technology that can be used to obtain various spatial layers of information about soil and crop conditions. It allows detection and/or characterization of an object, series of objects, or landscape without having the sensor in physical contact.


Nf03-582 Early Season Extentstion Using Hotcaps, Laurie Hodges Jan 2003

Nf03-582 Early Season Extentstion Using Hotcaps, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Hotcaps are covers used to protect individual plants from low temperature stress early in the season. There are three common hotcap designs: opaque plastic milk jugs, waxed paper, and plastic water-filled tubes. They are usually used by home gardeners or market gardeners with limited production. Growers with more acres or more extensive production tend to use row covers or high tunnels that protect more than one plant.

This NebFact discusses the study methodology, findings, and conclusions to using hotcaps in the garden.


Ec03-181 Alfalfa In Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas E. Hunt, Shripat T. Kamble, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Charles A. Shapiro Jan 2003

Ec03-181 Alfalfa In Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas E. Hunt, Shripat T. Kamble, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Charles A. Shapiro

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Alfalfa is the most important forage crop grown in Nebraska, with over 1,000 acres grown in every county. It has the highest feeding value for livestock and one of the highest yield potentials. Alfalfa can produce more protein per acre than any other crop and can provide all of the protein needed by many livestock as well as supplying large amounts of vitamins, minerals, and energy. Protein of alfalfa. In also covers the cultural practices, insect pests, diseases, weeds that affect alfalfa.


G03-1522 Damping Off Of Seedlings And Transplants, Laurie Hodges Jan 2003

G03-1522 Damping Off Of Seedlings And Transplants, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The shift toward more ecological means of pest control is a driving force in research and in growers' fields. Growers need to understand how the various pathogens causing plant disease respond to environmental conditions and cultural practices — what keeps the level of disease below an economic threshold and how these conditions can be developed and maintained for more sustainable production.

This NebGuide provides information on two common pathogens that cause seedling disease (damping off) in many crops. Although vegetable production is used in the examples, the principles apply to many cropping systems.


G03-1518 Chip Budding: An Old Grafting Technique For Woody Plants With Rediscovered Advantages For Nebraska, William A. Gustafson, T.M. (Todd) Morrissey Jan 2003

G03-1518 Chip Budding: An Old Grafting Technique For Woody Plants With Rediscovered Advantages For Nebraska, William A. Gustafson, T.M. (Todd) Morrissey

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Chip budding is one of the primary grafting methods used for the asexual propagation of woody plants used to produce named cultivars (varieties) or clones of many ornamental trees, shrubs, fruit and nut trees. It is one of the two most popular budding systems used in nursery production, and it is the only budding system that can be done on rootstocks (stocks) that have either active or dormant vascular cambiums.

This NebGuide explains how to perform the technique and lists which plants can be successfully chip budded.


Ec02-174 Noxious Weeds Of Nebraska: Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady Kappler Jan 2002

Ec02-174 Noxious Weeds Of Nebraska: Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady Kappler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Leafy spurge is an invasive weed that infests over three million acres in the northern Great Plains and the prairie provinces of Canada. It is commonly found in rangelands, pastures, roadsides, rights-of-way, and woodlands. Leafy spurge can reduce rangeland and pasture carrying capacity by as much as 75 percent because it competes with forages and cattle avoid grazing areas infested with this weed.

This Extension Circular discusses the biology, identification, distribution and control of leafy spurge.


Ec01-158 Integrating Management Objectives And Grazing Strategies On Semi-Arid Rangeland, Patrick E. Reece, Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht Jan 2001

Ec01-158 Integrating Management Objectives And Grazing Strategies On Semi-Arid Rangeland, Patrick E. Reece, Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Rangelands account for about half of Nebraska's total land area or about 24 million acres. Much of these expansive natural resource areas are in the semi-arid climatic region of Nebraska where grazing management decisions have a profound effect on ranch survival.

The educational object of this circular is to explain management practices that optimize the sustainability of rangeland-based enterprises. Additionally a decision-support tool is provided for selecting grazing systems best suited to livestock production and natural resource management objectives.


G01-1418 Turf In The Landscape (Revised April 2003), Anne Streich, Steven Rodie, Roch E. Gaussoin Jan 2001

G01-1418 Turf In The Landscape (Revised April 2003), Anne Streich, Steven Rodie, Roch E. Gaussoin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

To many people, landscape design means choosing the right tree, shrub or flower for a particular place. An important aspect of the landscape often overlooked, however, is the use of turf. Turf often becomes the leftover areas in the landscape rather than an integral design element.

Turf is a significant part of successful landscaping. This NebGuide explores the benefits and uses of turf in the landscape.


G00-1412 Daylilies (Revised March 2003), Anne Streich, Don Steinegger Jan 2000

G00-1412 Daylilies (Revised March 2003), Anne Streich, Don Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Daylilies (Hemerocallis sp.) are a common sight in many of today's landscapes. They are easy to grow, have few insect and disease problems and are available in many colors. In addition, they tolerate heat, drought, salt, compacted soil and various pH's. A daylily is available for almost any landscape condition and are discussed in this NebGuide.


G99-1375 Lilacs, Dale T. Lindgren, Don Steinegger, Todd Morrisey Jan 1999

G99-1375 Lilacs, Dale T. Lindgren, Don Steinegger, Todd Morrisey

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses lilac species, propagation, culture and pests.

Lilacs are among the most versatile shrubs grown in Nebraska. They come in various shapes, sizes, flower types and flower colors. Time of flowering also varies with species and cultivars. Lilacs can be used statewide for wind screens, hedges, accent plants or strictly for flower beauty and fragrance. Their drought and winter hardiness makes them easy to grow. They can survive, even when neglected, but perform better with care. Good soil drainage and full sun exposure are essential for optimal performance.


G99-1391 Diseases Of Home Garden Tomatoes, John E. Watkins Jan 1999

G99-1391 Diseases Of Home Garden Tomatoes, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Tomato diseases occur every year in every garden to some extent. This NebGuide discusses the symptoms and management of the most common and damaging ones in Nebraska.

Gardening is a favorite summer activity of backyard farmers and nothing tastes better than a ripe, home grown tomato. The popularity of local farmer's markets has increased tremendously in the 90s. Tomatoes are a mainstay of the backyard garden and the Saturday morning farmer's market. Being a successful gardener requires knowledge, skill and persistence. Every summer, nature pits the skills of the gardener against weather, insects and diseases. These challenges test ...


G96-1362 Soil Temperatures And Spring Planting Dates, Steven J. Meyer, Allen L. Dutcher Jan 1998

G96-1362 Soil Temperatures And Spring Planting Dates, Steven J. Meyer, Allen L. Dutcher

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Dates on which soil temperatures reach a threshold value are presented as a spring planting guide for agronomic and horticultural producers.

For a seed to germinate it must have good contact with the soil and be placed in a favorable soil environment. A good soil environment is one that has suitable soil temperature, adequate soil moisture, good aeration, and for certain seeds, light. Conditions necessary for germination depend on the species and variety of seed being planted. Alone, none of these factors guarantee germination; rather it is the interaction of these factors that affects seed germination.

In Nebraska, soil moisture ...


G98-1361 Hostas, Don Steinegger, Amy Greving, Steven Rodie Jan 1998

G98-1361 Hostas, Don Steinegger, Amy Greving, Steven Rodie

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses selecting, growing and caring for hosta.

Hosta Selection

As landscapes mature, shaded areas develop. An excellent perennial plant for shade is hosta, also called plantain lily. Originally from the Orient, hosta, a herbaceous perennial, is grown for its attractive foliage. Some recent cultivars also have attractive and/or fragrant flowers.


G98-1343 Fall Vegetable Gardening, Dale T. Lindgren, Susan D. Schoneweis Jan 1998

G98-1343 Fall Vegetable Gardening, Dale T. Lindgren, Susan D. Schoneweis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the possibilities for and needs of a fall garden.

Though often overlooked by the gardener, planting vegetables in July and August for fall production is an excellent practice. Late plantings of cool- and warm-season vegetables can extend the harvest long after spring-planted crops have ceased production. Most cool-season vegetables grow as well as or better than those planted in the spring as they mature during shorter, cooler days. Flavors of vegetables maturing in the cool, crisp days of autumn are often sweeter and milder than those grown during hot summer weather. This is especially true for cole ...


G96-1346 Plants For Shade Landscapes, Don Steinegger, Donald E. Janssen, Roch E. Gaussoin, Steven Rodie, Anne Streich Jan 1998

G96-1346 Plants For Shade Landscapes, Don Steinegger, Donald E. Janssen, Roch E. Gaussoin, Steven Rodie, Anne Streich

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide includes a plant list for shade landscapes.

While some may think of shade as a deterrent to gardening, it can be an asset if the special needs of shade-loving plants are considered. There are also ways to reduce the amount of shade, allowing more sunlight and air circulation into the landscape. To solve shade garden problems, shade's positive and negative aspects need to be considered.


G98-1363 Container Gardening (Revised September 2004), Anne Streich, Kim Todd, Kelly Feehan Jan 1998

G98-1363 Container Gardening (Revised September 2004), Anne Streich, Kim Todd, Kelly Feehan

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Container gardening has many advantages. People with physical limitations may appreciate the ability to garden without bending over or kneeling. Container gardens can also bring the garden closer to one's home or outdoor living area, such as along a sidewalk that is accessible from a wheelchair. Container gardens can place culinary herbs close to the kitchen to be snipped and used in cooking. Container gardens on patios or decks give people with limited outdoor space, such as an apartment and townhome dwellers, the opportunity to enjoy plants.

Growing flowers, vegetables, and other plants in containers provides many gardening opportunities ...


Nf97-353 What Is Quality. . . .In A Tomato?, Laurie Hodges Jan 1997

Nf97-353 What Is Quality. . . .In A Tomato?, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact examines the many factors affecting tomato quality.


G97-1315 Composting Manure And Other Organic Residues, Bahman Eghball Jan 1997

G97-1315 Composting Manure And Other Organic Residues, Bahman Eghball

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Composting is becoming more common in Nebraska because of the many advantages it offers. This NebGuide provides information on the composting process and its management and related issues.

The Composting Process

Composting is the aerobic decomposition of manure or other organic materials in the thermophilic temperature range (104-149°F). The composted material is odorless, fine-textured, and low-moisture and can be bagged and sold for use in gardens, or nurseries or used as fertilizer on cropland with little odor or fly breeding potential. Composting improves the handling characteristics of any organic residue by reducing its volume and weight. Composting can kill ...


Ec97-2506 A Place In The Country: The Acreage Owner's Guide, Gary C. Bergman, Corey Brubaker, Kathleen J. Cue, Dennis M. Ferraro, Keith Glewen, Donald E. Janssen, Kevin Kock, Richard J. Lodes, Barbara P. Ogg, Jim Peterson, Warder Shires, Sharon Skipton, Monte Stauffer, David L. Varner Jan 1997

Ec97-2506 A Place In The Country: The Acreage Owner's Guide, Gary C. Bergman, Corey Brubaker, Kathleen J. Cue, Dennis M. Ferraro, Keith Glewen, Donald E. Janssen, Kevin Kock, Richard J. Lodes, Barbara P. Ogg, Jim Peterson, Warder Shires, Sharon Skipton, Monte Stauffer, David L. Varner

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A special place in the country is often a long-awaited dream. For many it communicates freedom, open space, clean air and unique opportunities to enjoy hobbies, nature and quiet living at its best. Making this a reality not only requires a major financial investment, it also requires careful planning and assessment of the existing property or new homesite under consideration.

This extension circular helps you as an acreage owner make the right decisions when living in the country.


G97-1331 Backyard Wildlife To Feed A Hummingbird, Ron J. Johnson, Donald H. Steinegger Jan 1997

G97-1331 Backyard Wildlife To Feed A Hummingbird, Ron J. Johnson, Donald H. Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The sixth in the backyard wildlife series, this NebGuide describes plants and nectar feeding for attracting hummingbirds to your backyard in Nebraska. Four species of hummingbirds are found in Nebraska, one in the east and three in the west. Ruby-throated hummingbirds migrate through eastern Nebraska in spring and fall, and some nest here, mostly along the Missouri river valley. Typically, ruby-throat migration in Nebraska peaks about May 5-17 and September 2-18, but northward migration may occur from April to June and southward flights from August to early October. Broad-tailed and rufous hummingbirds are seen in the Nebraska panhandle during fall ...


G97-1341 Landscapes For Shade (Revised April 2003), Anne Streich, Donald E. Janssen, Roch E. Gaussoin, Steven Rodie Jan 1997

G97-1341 Landscapes For Shade (Revised April 2003), Anne Streich, Donald E. Janssen, Roch E. Gaussoin, Steven Rodie

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The cooling effect of a shade garden in midsummer can be one of life's great pleasures. The combination of shade and dappled sunlight encourages people to stop and enjoy a cool, quiet respite from a busy day.

This NebGuide includes information on gardening in the shade.


G97-1330 Apple Scab, Diane A. Merrell, Donald Steinegger Jan 1997

G97-1330 Apple Scab, Diane A. Merrell, Donald Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Apple scab, caused by the fungus Venturia inaequallis, occurs worldwide wherever apples are grown. Scab is one of the most important diseases of apples and crabapples in Nebraska.

This NebGuide discusses the apple scab disease, its symptoms, disease cycle, and cultural and chemical control. Varieties of apples and crabapples are listed according to their degree of resistance.


G96-1289 Diseases Of Home Garden Strawberries, John E. Watkins, David S. Wysong Jan 1996

G96-1289 Diseases Of Home Garden Strawberries, John E. Watkins, David S. Wysong

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide addresses on some of the common diseases affecting home garden strawberries in Nebraska and their control.

Strawberries are a favored fruit of home gardens. They have been adapted to a wide range of environmental conditions, but sometimes can be challenging to grow. Strawberry yields and fruit quality are influenced by interactions of environment, diseases, pests, and soil conditions.


Nf96-274 Seed Sources For Commercial Vegetable Production, Laurie Hodges Jan 1996

Nf96-274 Seed Sources For Commercial Vegetable Production, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has addresses of distributors of seeds for commercial vegetable production.