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Ec07-103 2007 Fall Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger, Robert N. Klein, Bruce Anderson, Jerry D. Volesky, P. Stephen Baenziger, James Krall Jan 2007

Ec07-103 2007 Fall Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger, Robert N. Klein, Bruce Anderson, Jerry D. Volesky, P. Stephen Baenziger, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The 2006 wheat crop has faced more than the usual number of challenges. Western Nebraska was again faced with shortages of rainfall as well as wheat streak mosaic. Eastern Nebraska fared better, but some places had soil borne mosaic problems. Overall, the state yield was down but becasue of similar problems throughout the Great Plains, the price of wheat has remained strong. This circular is a progress report of variety trials conducted by personnel of the Agronomy Department, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers and their associated agricultural laboratories and the South Central Ag Lab. Conduct of experiments ...


Ec07-101 2007 Spring Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, Bruce Anderson, Robert N. Klein, Richard B. Ferguson, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall Jan 2007

Ec07-101 2007 Spring Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, Bruce Anderson, Robert N. Klein, Richard B. Ferguson, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of variety and hybrid performance tests conducted by the Agronomy/Horticulture Department, the Northeast, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers, the South Central Agricultural Laboratory as part of the University of Nebraska and University of Wyoming at Torrington. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service. The following pages include the results of our variety testing programs for many crop species throughtout the state. We hope you find this information useful as you make hybrid and variety decisions for ...


Nf04-616 Managing Foliar Diseases Of Winter Wheat With Fungicides Treatment Criteria, Profitability And Products, John E. Watkins Jan 2004

Nf04-616 Managing Foliar Diseases Of Winter Wheat With Fungicides Treatment Criteria, Profitability And Products, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The leaf rust, stripe rust, powdery mildew, tan spot, Septoria leaf blotch and occasionally stem rust comprise the primary foliar disease of wheat in the central Great Plains. In southeast and south central Nebraska, leaf and stripe rusts, powdery mildew and Septoria leaf blotch are the most common and important foliar diseases. Tan spot predominates in the dryland wheat-fallow-wheat or ecofallow cropping systems found in the west central, southwest and Panhandle areas of Nebraska.

This NebFact discusses the treatment criteria, profitability of treatment, and the treatment products and timing of managing foliar diseases of winter wheat with fungicides.


Nf04-594 Resistanct Management For Yieldgard Rootworm™ Bt Corn, Robert J. Wright, Thomas E. Hunt Jan 2004

Nf04-594 Resistanct Management For Yieldgard Rootworm™ Bt Corn, Robert J. Wright, Thomas E. Hunt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In 2003, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Monsanto announced the registration of YieldGard Rootworm™ corn containing event MON863. These hybrids express a protein in the roots from the soil bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) that is toxic to larval corn rootworms.

This NebFact discusses management requirements, refuge considerations, within-field configurations when using YieldGard Rootworm™.


Cc03-431 Make Every Drop Count In Your Home Jan 2003

Cc03-431 Make Every Drop Count In Your Home

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

There are four ways to reduce water in your home ...

1. Maintain -- Fix leaks and dripping faucets. Leaks can account for 14 to 25 percent of all indoor water use.

2. Change -- Change the way water is used in the home.

3. Equipment -- Purchase water-reducing equipment and appliances.

4. Think -- Develop creative water conserving practices that are safe and sanitary.

Start wtih the largest water users. The toilet, shower/bath, and clothes washer account for two-thirds of the water used in an average household.


Cc03-432 Make Every Drop Count In Your Home On Your Yard Jan 2003

Cc03-432 Make Every Drop Count In Your Home On Your Yard

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Did You Know...

Weather adjustments to an automatic irrigation system can conserve A LOT of water.

A system applying 1 inch of water to an average size lawn (approximately 5,000 square feet) that has already received sufficient rain wastes over 3,000 gallons of water -- a year's supply of drinking water for 17 people.


Nf03-582 Early Season Extentstion Using Hotcaps, Laurie Hodges Jan 2003

Nf03-582 Early Season Extentstion Using Hotcaps, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Hotcaps are covers used to protect individual plants from low temperature stress early in the season. There are three common hotcap designs: opaque plastic milk jugs, waxed paper, and plastic water-filled tubes. They are usually used by home gardeners or market gardeners with limited production. Growers with more acres or more extensive production tend to use row covers or high tunnels that protect more than one plant.

This NebFact discusses the study methodology, findings, and conclusions to using hotcaps in the garden.


Nf03-571 Aspergillus Flavus And Aflatoxins In Corn, Jim Stack, Michael Carlson Jan 2003

Nf03-571 Aspergillus Flavus And Aflatoxins In Corn, Jim Stack, Michael Carlson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The severe weather conditions of the 2002 growing season resulted in an increase in the incidence and severity of aflatoxin contamination of both food grade and feed grade corn in Nebraska.

The mycotoxin called aflatoxin is produced by the grain mold Aspergillus flavus. Not all isolates of A. flavus produced aflatoxin and isolates that are capable of producing aflatoxin do not always synthesize the toxin. Many factors including environmental conditions and host suscepbitility, determine the incidence and severity of grain mold and subsequent mycotoxin contamination.

This NebFact discusses the cause and occurrence of aflatoxin in corn; the effects it has ...


Nf03-570 Fumonisins In Corn, Jim Stack, Michael Carlson Jan 2003

Nf03-570 Fumonisins In Corn, Jim Stack, Michael Carlson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

During the past two years, millers have rejected some Nebraska food grade corn because it was contaminated with the mycotoxin fumonisin. Most of the contaminated samples and the highest levels of contamination were detected in corn from counties in the eastern half of Nebraska.

Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by the grain molds Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium proliferatum. These fungi are commonly found in corn throughout the United States.

This NebFact discusses the cause and occurrence of fumonisin in corn; the effects it has on plants, animals and humans; and management options to minimize fumonisin contamination.


G03-1487 Fat And Fat Substitutes, Georgia Jones Jan 2003

G03-1487 Fat And Fat Substitutes, Georgia Jones

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

For some people, fat has a negative connotation. However, fat is a necessary nutrient and provides many functions in food products.

Fats are a source of energy for the body and supply essential fatty acids, such as linoleic and linolenic. They are required for maintaining healthy skin and regulating cholesterol production. Fats are used to carry fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K and aid in their absorption from the intestine.

Fats play a key role in determining texture, taste and flavor of foods and affect the acceptability of food. They provide the smooth texture of salad dressing, the creamy ...


Ec03-181 Alfalfa In Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas E. Hunt, Shripat T. Kamble, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Charles A. Shapiro Jan 2003

Ec03-181 Alfalfa In Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas E. Hunt, Shripat T. Kamble, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Charles A. Shapiro

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Alfalfa is the most important forage crop grown in Nebraska, with over 1,000 acres grown in every county. It has the highest feeding value for livestock and one of the highest yield potentials. Alfalfa can produce more protein per acre than any other crop and can provide all of the protein needed by many livestock as well as supplying large amounts of vitamins, minerals, and energy. Protein of alfalfa. In also covers the cultural practices, insect pests, diseases, weeds that affect alfalfa.


G03-1518 Chip Budding: An Old Grafting Technique For Woody Plants With Rediscovered Advantages For Nebraska, William A. Gustafson, T.M. (Todd) Morrissey Jan 2003

G03-1518 Chip Budding: An Old Grafting Technique For Woody Plants With Rediscovered Advantages For Nebraska, William A. Gustafson, T.M. (Todd) Morrissey

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Chip budding is one of the primary grafting methods used for the asexual propagation of woody plants used to produce named cultivars (varieties) or clones of many ornamental trees, shrubs, fruit and nut trees. It is one of the two most popular budding systems used in nursery production, and it is the only budding system that can be done on rootstocks (stocks) that have either active or dormant vascular cambiums.

This NebGuide explains how to perform the technique and lists which plants can be successfully chip budded.


Ec03-2501 Pesticide Safety Telephone Hotlines Jan 2003

Ec03-2501 Pesticide Safety Telephone Hotlines

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This extension circular is a two-sided card for your billfold with the telephone hotline numbers to the following organizations:

Non--emergency ̬ National Pesticide Telecommunications Network (medical and consumer information on pesticides); and Chemical Referral Center (referrals to manufacturers on health and safety related to chemicals).

Emergency ̬ The Poison Center in Omaha for aid in human poisoning cases; Pesticide Accident Hotline (CHEMTREC) for help involving spills, leaks, fires; and the Nebraska State Patrol to report chemical spills or releases and motor vehicle accidents.


Ec03-1759 Nebraska Register Of Champion Trees 2003, Scott J. Josiah Jan 2003

Ec03-1759 Nebraska Register Of Champion Trees 2003, Scott J. Josiah

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This register lists the largest trees of over 80 species identified in Nebraska. The name of the owner and nominator, size and location of each tree follow each listing.

Many people across Nebraska have worked hard to make this register as comprehensive and accurate as possible, but the quest to find the largest trees in Nebraska is never over. Champion trees are by nature old, and old trees diminish and die. Larger trees are newly discovered. Thus, this list continually changes as new nominations are submitted.


Nf02-504 Atrazine And Non-Atrazine Herbicide Comparisons In No-Till Corn, Fred Roeth, Alex Martin Jan 2002

Nf02-504 Atrazine And Non-Atrazine Herbicide Comparisons In No-Till Corn, Fred Roeth, Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Atrazine herbicide has been in an EPA special review since 1994 because of soil surface runoff concerns. Beginning in 1997, we evaluated atrazine and non-atrazine herbicide treatments in conventional tillage corn and no-till corn on university research farms at Clay Center (irrigated) and Lincoln, Nebraska (non-irrigated). The objective was to compare some common atrazine and non-atrazine herbicides in soil-applied and post emergence treatment combinations. Fourteen herbicide treatments were selected to represent commonly used herbicide classes and application timings. This NebFact reports the no-till results.


Nf02-503 Atrazine And Non-Atrazine Herbicide Comparisons In Conventional Till Corn, Fred Roeth, Alex Martin Jan 2002

Nf02-503 Atrazine And Non-Atrazine Herbicide Comparisons In Conventional Till Corn, Fred Roeth, Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Atrazine herbicide has been in an EPA special review since 1994 because of surface and groundwater contamination concerns. Beginning in 1997, we evaluated atrazine and non-atrazine herbicides in conventional tillage corn and no-till corn on university research farms at Clay Center and Lincoln, Nebraska. The objective was to compare some common atrazine and non-atrazine herbicides for weed control and crop response. Thirteen herbicides were selected to represent commonly used herbicide classes and treatment timings. This NebFact reports the conventional till results.


Nf02-518 Management Of Phytophthora Diseases Of Soybeans, Loren J. Giesler, Jane A. Christensen, Christopher M. Zwiener Jan 2002

Nf02-518 Management Of Phytophthora Diseases Of Soybeans, Loren J. Giesler, Jane A. Christensen, Christopher M. Zwiener

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Phythophthora diseases of soybean, caused by Phytophthora sojae, are present wherever soybeans are grown in Nebraska. The pathogen survives primarily as "resting" spores in the soil or in association with infested crop debris. Symptoms associated with Phytophthora sojae, infections include seed rots, pre- and post-emergence dampin goff of seedlings and stem rot of plants at various growth stages.

Knowledge of the races present in the state and how varieties with different resistance genes have performed in a grower's field is critical to variety selection for maximum profitability.


Nf02-506 Plant Disease Central Web Site, Jim Stack Jan 2002

Nf02-506 Plant Disease Central Web Site, Jim Stack

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Disease is a natural part of every crop production system. This is true for all crop species and for each type of production system; irrigated or rain-fed, conventional or conservation tillage, and continuous or rotational cropping. In any given year, the question is which diseases will occur in Nebraska's field crops and at what incidence and severity.

To help producers, consultants, and other agricultural professionals diagnose and manage field crop diseases in Nebraska, the Plant Disease Central (PDC) web site was developed. The home page includes instructions on navigating the site under the "About This Site" link.

This NebFact ...


Nf02-505 Drinking Water: Chloramines Waters Disinfection In Omaha Metropolitan Utilities District, Sharon Skipton, Bruce I. Dvorak Jan 2002

Nf02-505 Drinking Water: Chloramines Waters Disinfection In Omaha Metropolitan Utilities District, Sharon Skipton, Bruce I. Dvorak

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Bacteria and other disease-causing organisms in drinking water can cause intestinal infections, dysentery, and a variety of other illnesses. Water disinfection reduces disease-causing organisms and prevents the transmission of disease. This publication discusses the disinfection process used by Metropolitan Utilities District and how it will change in 2002.


Nf02-543 Ascochyta Blight Of Chickpeas, Robert M. Harveson Jan 2002

Nf02-543 Ascochyta Blight Of Chickpeas, Robert M. Harveson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The chickpea (Cicer arietinum) ranks among the world's three most important pulse (legume) crops. It is an important source of protein in many parts of central Asia, Africa and the Mediterranean and among the food legumes, is the most effective in reducing blood ocholesterol levels. The crop is antive to western Asia and the Middle East, and is usually grown as a rainfed cool-weather crop or as a dry climate crop in semi-arid regions.

Although chickpeas are reported to be susceptible to over 50 pathogens, few diseases are currently recognized as significant economic constraints to production. Ascochyta blight caused ...


Nf02-520 Fungicide Spray Schedule For Home Garden Small Fruits, John E. Watkins, Jernnifer L. Chaky Jan 2002

Nf02-520 Fungicide Spray Schedule For Home Garden Small Fruits, John E. Watkins, Jernnifer L. Chaky

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Home grown strawberries, raspberries and grapes are a rewarding experience for the gardener as well as the consumer of the fresh fruits and jellies. If properly managed, these crops can be a source of enjoyment for years. To be successful, however, the home gardener must develop a sound integrated pest management (IPM) approach to controlling diseases and insect pests. A good IPM program makes use of cultural, varietal and chemical means of preventing or reducing disease losses.

This NebFact discusses which fungicides to use for which disease of small garden fruits and provides recommendations for a fungicide treatment schedule.


Nf02-519 Fungicide Spray Schedule For Home Garden Tree Fruits, Jennifer L. Chaky, John E. Watkins Jan 2002

Nf02-519 Fungicide Spray Schedule For Home Garden Tree Fruits, Jennifer L. Chaky, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Growing tree fruits in the home garden can be a very enjoyable experience, and with proper management, can provide many years of enjoyment. Success in growing tree frutis depends on following an approach known as integrated pest management, or IPM. In this management program, variety selection, cultural practices and chemical means are used to prevent or reduce losses due to diseases or insects.

This NebFact covers cultural practices, variety selection, the control of disease problems, and how to correctly use chemical controls for a safer environment.


Ec02-459 Heating And Cooling Systems: Saving Energy And Keeping Safe (Home*A*Syst Worksheet 1), Shirley Niemeyer, Sharon Skipton Jan 2002

Ec02-459 Heating And Cooling Systems: Saving Energy And Keeping Safe (Home*A*Syst Worksheet 1), Shirley Niemeyer, Sharon Skipton

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Your house should be a safe, comfortable place that is affordable and durable. A house is affordable only when costs for heating and cooling are reasonable. Energy bills are lowest if a home is tightly air-sealed and pr0perly insulated and if all mechanical systems are operating efficiently.

This worksheet will help you assess the environment of your home. It will take you step-by-step through current home energy management practices and conditions. Evaluate activities and conditions according to how they might affect energy use and human health. Provide easy to understand "risk level scores" that will help the you analyze the ...


Ec02-458 Heating And Cooling Systems: Saving Energy And Keeping Safe (Home*A*Syst Fact Sheet 1), Shirley Niemeyer, Sharon Skipton Jan 2002

Ec02-458 Heating And Cooling Systems: Saving Energy And Keeping Safe (Home*A*Syst Fact Sheet 1), Shirley Niemeyer, Sharon Skipton

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Your house should be a safe, comfortable place that is affordable and durable. How a home is constructed, insulated, and heated and cooled directly affects how well it meets these objectives. A house is affordable only when costs for heating and cooling are reasonable. Energy bills are lowest if a home is tightly air-sealed and properly insulated and if all mechanical systems are operating efficiently. Before extensively air-sealing your home, it is critical to ensure that doing so will not cause health or moisture problems by examining adequate air intake. Above, all else, your home must be a healthy place ...


G02-1466 Determining The Need To Fertilize Landscape Trees And Shrubs (Revised March 2004), Scott J. Dewald, Steven D. Rasmussen, Charles A. Shapiro, Scott J. Josiah Jan 2002

G02-1466 Determining The Need To Fertilize Landscape Trees And Shrubs (Revised March 2004), Scott J. Dewald, Steven D. Rasmussen, Charles A. Shapiro, Scott J. Josiah

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Most Nebraska soils are fertile enough to support tree and shrub growth without applying fertilizer. However, when woody plants exhibit poor growth or reduced vigor, yet have had adequate moisture and are not experiencing pest problems or other environmental limitations, the proper applicatin of fertilizer may be necessary. This NebGuide explains how to determine if fertilization of established trees and shrubs is required and how to apply the needed amount.


Cc02-425 Achieving Success With A Business Plan, Ram Valluru, Allen Prosch, H. Douglas Jose Jan 2002

Cc02-425 Achieving Success With A Business Plan, Ram Valluru, Allen Prosch, H. Douglas Jose

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The publication, Achieving Success With a Business Plan includes instructions and wookbook to prepare a farm business plan. The areas covered in this publication include: business organization; history and overview of operation; mission statement; goals; priorities, purpose and strategic outlook; situation statements; legal and contractual situation; production situation; financial situation; marketing situation; personnel situation; and Risk Management Plan.


Ec01-120 Certified Perennial Grass Varieties Recommended For Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Roger Kanable, Ken Vogel Jan 2001

Ec01-120 Certified Perennial Grass Varieties Recommended For Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Roger Kanable, Ken Vogel

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

More than 100 species of perennial grasses are adapted to and grown in Nebraska. They are classified as either "cool-season" or "warm-season" grasses. The following map, "Major Land Resource Areas For Selecting Adapted Grass Species and Varieties," depicts 16 regions within the state of Nebraska. The table, "Varieties of Grasses for Use in Major Land Resource Areas of Nebraska," shows which grass varieties are best adapted to different sites in each region. After identifying the region on the map, use the table to select an appropriate grass variety for your site.


G01-1433, Environmental Stresses And Tree Health, Jon S. Wilson, Mark O. Harrell Jan 2001

G01-1433, Environmental Stresses And Tree Health, Jon S. Wilson, Mark O. Harrell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Environmental stresses cause many health problems in Nebraska trees. Hot and cold temperatures, drying winds, poor soil and root conditions and human activity can damage leaves, bark and roots, and can predispose trees to secondary insect and disease attack. Keeping a tree in good condition through proper maintenance can prevent many environmentally related health problems.

This NebGuide is intended to help tree owners identify tree health problems caused by environmental stresses and provide ways to prevent or reduce damage.


Nf00-410 Fungicide Options For Managing Foliar Diseases On Wheat, John E. Watkins Jan 2000

Nf00-410 Fungicide Options For Managing Foliar Diseases On Wheat, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Stripe and leaf rusts, tan spot and Septoria leaf blotch comprise the four primary foliar diseases of wheat in the central Great Plains. In eastern and south central Nebraska leaf rust and Septoria leaf blotch are common, and in the wheat-fallow-wheat regions of western Nebraska, tan spot is an important foliar disease. Stripe rust occurs statewide.

This NebFact discusses the options of treatment criteria, profitability of treatment, treatment products and timing for managing foliar diseases of wheat.


Nf00-411 Seed Treatment Fungicides For Soybeans (Revised January 2004), Loren J. Giesler Jan 2000

Nf00-411 Seed Treatment Fungicides For Soybeans (Revised January 2004), Loren J. Giesler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The most common soybean disease problem in Nebraska is seedling damping off and seed rot caused by several fungi. Early season damping off and root rots are often followed by premature death, which in many instances may be attributed to fungal infections earlier in the season.

This NebFact discusses the seed treatment fungicides for soybeans. These includes protectants (contacts) that are effective only on the seed surface; and systemic fungicides that are absorbed by the emerging seedling, which inhibit or kill the fungus inside host plant tissues.