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Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec05-1573 Corn Insects Ii, Robert J. Wright, Terry A. Devries, James A. Kalisch Jan 2005

Ec05-1573 Corn Insects Ii, Robert J. Wright, Terry A. Devries, James A. Kalisch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, 4-color extension circular covers information on Nebraska corn insects identification and management. These include: Western corn rootworm, Northern corn rootworm, seed corn maggot, wireworm, Southern corn leaf beetle, corn leaf aphid, twospotted spider mite, Banks grass mite, corn flea beetle, white grub, annual grub, three year grub, seed corn beetle, and chinch bug.


Ec05-1572 Corn Insects I, Robert J. Wright, Terry A. Devries, James A. Kalisch Jan 2005

Ec05-1572 Corn Insects I, Robert J. Wright, Terry A. Devries, James A. Kalisch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, 4-color extension circular covers the identification and management of Nebraska corn insects. These include: European corn borer, Western bean cutworm, corn earworm, armyworm, fall armyworm, common stalk borer, and black cutworm.


Nf05-653 Pyemotes Itch Mites, James A. Kalisch, David L. Keith, Alberto R. Broce Jan 2005

Nf05-653 Pyemotes Itch Mites, James A. Kalisch, David L. Keith, Alberto R. Broce

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Two North American Species of itch mites — the straw itch mite and the "oak leaf gall mite" (Family Pyemotidae) — are found in Nebraska and Kansas. The straw itch mite was known in the early 1900s as a nuisance pest after farm workers handled small grains. Wheat, oats, and barley were often infested with insects on which the itch mites fed, allowing them to reach large numbers by harvest. The oak leaf gall mite recently discovered in galls on pin oaks in Lincoln, Neb., and Manhattan, Kan., is believed to be a relatively recent introduction to the United States.

This NebFact ...


Nf05-634 Fungicides To Manage Soybean Rust: What Are The Product Differences?, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas J. Weissling Jan 2005

Nf05-634 Fungicides To Manage Soybean Rust: What Are The Product Differences?, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas J. Weissling

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

If Nebraska soybean producers find themselves needing to apply a fungicide for soybean rust this year, it will be important to choose an effective product based on the stage of disease development in the specific field. It will be important for all producers and crop managers to be aware of where soybean rust is being detected to pursue a treatment that provides the maximum return on investment for any fungicides being applied.

This NebFact discusses the fungicides available for Nebraska soybean fields and resistance management issues.


Nf04-599 Soybean Aphid Management In Nebraska, Thomas E. Hunt Jan 2004

Nf04-599 Soybean Aphid Management In Nebraska, Thomas E. Hunt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) is Nebraska's newest soybean insect pests, arriving in the United States in 2000 and in Nebraska in 2002. Yield losses of over 20 percent have been documented in some northeast Nebraska fields.

This NebFact covers the description, initial observations, life cycle and injury, and management of the soybean aphid in Nebraska.


Nf04-594 Resistanct Management For Yieldgard Rootworm™ Bt Corn, Robert J. Wright, Thomas E. Hunt Jan 2004

Nf04-594 Resistanct Management For Yieldgard Rootworm™ Bt Corn, Robert J. Wright, Thomas E. Hunt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In 2003, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Monsanto announced the registration of YieldGard Rootworm™ corn containing event MON863. These hybrids express a protein in the roots from the soil bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) that is toxic to larval corn rootworms.

This NebFact discusses management requirements, refuge considerations, within-field configurations when using YieldGard Rootworm™.


Ec03-181 Alfalfa In Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas E. Hunt, Shripat T. Kamble, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Charles A. Shapiro Jan 2003

Ec03-181 Alfalfa In Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas E. Hunt, Shripat T. Kamble, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Charles A. Shapiro

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Alfalfa is the most important forage crop grown in Nebraska, with over 1,000 acres grown in every county. It has the highest feeding value for livestock and one of the highest yield potentials. Alfalfa can produce more protein per acre than any other crop and can provide all of the protein needed by many livestock as well as supplying large amounts of vitamins, minerals, and energy. Protein of alfalfa. In also covers the cultural practices, insect pests, diseases, weeds that affect alfalfa.


Ec02-1550 Nebraska Management Guide For Arthropod Pests Of Livestock And Horses, John B. Campbell Jan 2002

Ec02-1550 Nebraska Management Guide For Arthropod Pests Of Livestock And Horses, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Understanding the differences in insecticide formulations is important to selecting the right one for the job. This publication discusses the different insecticides and ways of treating your animals. They include: dusts, emulsifiable concentrates, emulsifiable livestock insecticides, flowables (thick fluids mixed with water), soluble powders, wettable powders, and water dispersible liquids. Insecticides listed in this publication are considered safe when used according to label directions.


Nf02-551 Management Of Blister Beetles In Alfalfa, John B. Campbell, Steve Ensley Jan 2002

Nf02-551 Management Of Blister Beetles In Alfalfa, John B. Campbell, Steve Ensley

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Adult blister beetles (Epicauta spp.) tend to be gregarious, and several may be observed feeding on the same flowering plant such as alfalfa or sometimes soybeans, goldenrod or occasionally musk thistle, They feed primarily on leaves and flowers but do little damage to crops.

This NebFact discusses the life cycle, damage, treatment, and prevention avoidance of the blister beetle here in Nebraska.


G01-1430 Using The Sugar Roll Technique To Detect Varroa Mites In Honey Bee Colonies, Marion D. Ellis, Paul A. Macedo Jan 2001

G01-1430 Using The Sugar Roll Technique To Detect Varroa Mites In Honey Bee Colonies, Marion D. Ellis, Paul A. Macedo

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes a rapid and efficient technique for detecting and assessing varroa mite infestations. It uses powdered sugar to dislodge mites from bees.

The varroa mite was first discovered in the United States in 1987. Globally, it is the most important pest of honey bees and it has caused extensive losses in feral and managed colonies. Once introduced, varroa mites have never been eradicated from any country or region, and beekeepers must adopt an integrated pest management strategy to protect their colonies. Early detection and assessment of infestation levels are important components of a varroa management plan. Since varroa ...


Ec00-1564 A Guide To Identifying Nebraska Bumble Bee Species, Marion D. Ellis, Doug Golick Jan 2000

Ec00-1564 A Guide To Identifying Nebraska Bumble Bee Species, Marion D. Ellis, Doug Golick

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

For more people, pollen means allergies and bees mean stings. However, you should thank a bee, butterfly, bat, bird, or other pollinator for one out of every three bites of food you eat. There are 95 crops grown in the United States that require insect pollinators. In addition, many bee-pollinated plants provide food for wildlife, increase soil fertility, and beautify our landscapes.

This extension circular discusses the importance of bees, capturing bees, making a reference collection, identification guide, and glossary.


Nf00-425 Resistance Management For European Corn Borer And Bt Transgenic Corn: Refuge Design And Placement (Revised October 2002), Thomas E. Hunt, G.W. Echtenkamp Jan 2000

Nf00-425 Resistance Management For European Corn Borer And Bt Transgenic Corn: Refuge Design And Placement (Revised October 2002), Thomas E. Hunt, G.W. Echtenkamp

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

One of the key issues surrounding the use of Bt transgenic corn hybrids is resistance management. These corn hybrids have been engineered to produce a version of the insecticidal protein from the naturally occurring soil bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), that is toxic to European corn borers and a few other insects.

This NebFact discusses the important principles of resistance management for European corn borer and Bt corn and refuge considerations.


Mp99-40 The Economics And Control Of Insects Affecting Beef Cattle In Nebraska (Northern Great Plains), John B. Campbell, Gustave D. Thomas Jan 1999

Mp99-40 The Economics And Control Of Insects Affecting Beef Cattle In Nebraska (Northern Great Plains), John B. Campbell, Gustave D. Thomas

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Livestock insect control should be considered an integral part of an efficient beef herd health program.

This extension circular discusses the behavior and control of these major insect parasites of range and pasture cattle in Nebraska: stable fly, horn fly, face fly, cattle grubs, cattle lice, cattle scabies, horse and deer flies, mosquito, black fly, and biting midges (gnats).


G98-1347 Protecting Bees When Using Insecticides, Marion D. Ellis, Frederick P. Baxendale, David L. Keith Jan 1998

G98-1347 Protecting Bees When Using Insecticides, Marion D. Ellis, Frederick P. Baxendale, David L. Keith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Bees are valuable pollinators and need to be protected when pesticides are applied, especially when plants are in bloom. Learn how to best protect them with tips for specific crops, chemicals, and application times.

Bees are valuable pollinators of 95 crops grown in the United States. Bee-pollinated crops have a farm value of approximately $10 billion. Bees are as vital as soil fertility, irrigation, and pest control in the production of crops requiring bee pollination. Bees also are valuable pollinators of many wild plants that provide food and cover to wildlife, contribute to soil fertility and erosion control, and add ...


Ec98-151 Amaranth: Production Manual For The Central United States, Jane Sooby, David D. Baltensperger, Robert Myers, David Brenner, Richard Wilson, Charles Block Jan 1998

Ec98-151 Amaranth: Production Manual For The Central United States, Jane Sooby, David D. Baltensperger, Robert Myers, David Brenner, Richard Wilson, Charles Block

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Amaranth is a small-seeded grain crop with a dramatic history. Once a staple in the diet of the Aztec Indians, today it is grown throughout the world. In the United States much of the production is small-scale and organic, grown mainly for the natural and health food markets. There also has been steady use of the crop for breakfast cereals, snack foods, and mass-produced multigrain bread products. Amaranth is a broadleaf plant well-adapted to a range of arid and humid environments. As a crop it fits into many dryland rotations, performing well following wheat, proso millet, or other grain crops ...


G98-1359 Western Bean Cutworm In Corn And Dry Beans (Revised April 2004), Ronald C. Seymour, Gary L. Hein, Robert J. Wright, John B. Campbell Jan 1998

G98-1359 Western Bean Cutworm In Corn And Dry Beans (Revised April 2004), Ronald C. Seymour, Gary L. Hein, Robert J. Wright, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Western bean cutworm (WBC) can be a severe pest in corn and dry beans. Larval feeding damages both crops through reduced yield and quality. In corn, direct feeding losses may be compounded by fungal and mold infections associated with larval waste products. In beans, damaged or 'worm-chewed' beans are a significant quality factor for both processed and dry bagged beans. Western bean cutworm infestations occur every year in western Nebraska. In some years, this pest is found in high numbers throughout the state.

This NebGuide addresses the life cycle, scouting and treatment of the western bean cutworm in corn and ...


Nf97-329 A Guide To Grasshopper Control On Rangeland, John B. Campbell, Patrick E. Reece, Gary L. Hein Jan 1997

Nf97-329 A Guide To Grasshopper Control On Rangeland, John B. Campbell, Patrick E. Reece, Gary L. Hein

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses effects of grasshoppers on rangeland, how to manage rangeland to minimize grasshopper impact, how to monitor grasshopper populations, and how to select and apply insecticides when control measures are needed.


Nf97-327 A Guide To Grasshopper Control In Yards And Gardens, Gary L. Hein, John B. Campbell, Ronald C. Seymour Jan 1997

Nf97-327 A Guide To Grasshopper Control In Yards And Gardens, Gary L. Hein, John B. Campbell, Ronald C. Seymour

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses grasshopper damage to yards and gardens, strategies to reduce the problem, and methods to achieve control.


Nf97-328 A Guide To Grasshopper Control In Cropland (Revised May 2004), Gary L. Hein, John B. Campbell Jan 1997

Nf97-328 A Guide To Grasshopper Control In Cropland (Revised May 2004), Gary L. Hein, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Grasshoppers have been a major concern to farmers and ranchers since Nebraska was first settled. The potential for devastation, while still serious, is not as great as it was 100 years ago because many of the prime grasshopper breeding areas along the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains are now under tillage. Statewide, grasshopper populations fluctuate in cycles with large numbers occurring for two to four years, followed by moderate numbers for several years.

This NebFact discusses grasshopper damage to cropland, how to determine when control is required and methods of control.


Nf96-307 Managing The Russian Wheat Aphid With Resistant Wheat Varieties, John Thomas, Gary Hein, David D. Baltensperger, Lenis Alton Nelson, Scott Haley Jan 1996

Nf96-307 Managing The Russian Wheat Aphid With Resistant Wheat Varieties, John Thomas, Gary Hein, David D. Baltensperger, Lenis Alton Nelson, Scott Haley

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has information on using resistant wheat varieties to control Russian wheat aphids.


Ec96-1555 Insect Pest Management Strategies For Yards And Gardens, Frederick P. Baxendale, Robert J. Wright Jan 1996

Ec96-1555 Insect Pest Management Strategies For Yards And Gardens, Frederick P. Baxendale, Robert J. Wright

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A growing awareness of problems associated with overusing pesticides has prompted many home gardeners and landscape managers to seek alternative methods of insect control. Integrated pest management (IPM) uses suitable methods in a compatible manner to maintain pest densities below levels of unacceptable injury.

IPM principles can be applied to all pest groups (insects, mites, weeds, plant diseases and vertebrates), and urban as well as agricultural settings. This publication will discuss how integrated pest management can be applied to insect and mite management in yards and gardens.


G96-1300 Insects That Feed On Corn Ears, David L. Keith, J. F. Witkowski Jan 1996

G96-1300 Insects That Feed On Corn Ears, David L. Keith, J. F. Witkowski

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

How to identify mature and immature insects that infest and damage ears of corn.

Several kinds of insects infest the developing ears of corn, raising farmers' concerns and sometimes causing economic damage. Some of these insects can reduce both yield and quality of seed corn, pop corn, sweet corn and field corn. Control decisions depend in part on the economics of the corn crop produced. In many cases, particularly in field corn where the value of the crop per acre is somewhat lower, the insects may not be sufficiently damaging to require control. The higher value of seed corn compared ...


G96-1302 Managing Varroa In The Midwest, Marion D. Ellis, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1996

G96-1302 Managing Varroa In The Midwest, Marion D. Ellis, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

There are important regional differences in varroa population dynamics and control. This NebGuide offers recommendations on varroa management for beekeepers in the Midwest.

Varroa management has become an essential aspect of successful beekeeping since the mite was first discovered in the United States in 1987. Unlike most parasites which coexist with their host, varroa eventually destroy honey bee colonies of European descent. A good understanding of this important bee parasite is essential for successful beekeeping.


G95-1251 Biological Control Of Insect And Mite Pests, Robert J. Wright Jan 1995

G95-1251 Biological Control Of Insect And Mite Pests, Robert J. Wright

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The advantages and disadvantages of the three forms of biological control of insect and mite pests -- classical, augmentation and conservation -- are discussed.

Biological control is the conscious use of living beneficial organisms, called natural enemies, to control pests. Biological control should be an important part of any integrated pest management program, an approach which combines a variety of pest control methods to reduce pest levels below an economic threshold. Virtually all insect and mite pests have some natural enemies. Managing these natural enemies can effectively control many pests. Often the use of insecticides or other practices can injure or kill ...


G94-1204 Face Fly Control Guide, John B. Campbell Jan 1994

G94-1204 Face Fly Control Guide, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The face fly congregates about the eyes and nose of animals, causing annoyance and possible disease transmission. This NebGuide discusses face fly breeding and effective controls.

The face fly closely resembles the house fly except it is slightly larger and darker. Other differentiating characteristics include: 1) the abdomen of the male face fly is orange and the female has an orange stripe; the abdomen of the house fly is white or light grey and 2) the compound eyes of male face flies nearly touch but are separated in the house flies.

The persistence and habit of congregating about the eyes ...


G94-1208 Managing The Alfalfa Weevil, Stephen D. Danielson, Thomas E. Hunt, Keith J. Jarvi Jan 1994

G94-1208 Managing The Alfalfa Weevil, Stephen D. Danielson, Thomas E. Hunt, Keith J. Jarvi

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The identification and life cycle of the alfalfa weevil are discussed along with scouting techniques, economic thresholds, and other integrated pest management tactics.

The alfalfa weevil is the primary insect pest of alfalfa in Nebraska. Management is essential to reduce crop losses, particularly during years when weevil infestation is high. Because there also are years when weevil damage is economically unimportant, it is necessary for growers to become familiar with sampling procedures, management guidelines, and control recommendations so control techniques are not used unnecessarily.


G94-1220 Controlling Ticks, John B. Campbell, Gustave D. Thomas Jan 1994

G94-1220 Controlling Ticks, John B. Campbell, Gustave D. Thomas

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Identification and control of ticks common to Nebraska.

Ticks are members of the same phylum (Arthropoda) of the animal kingdom as insects, but are in a different class (Arachnida). The main difference is the body of a tick is composed of only two sections while insect bodies have three sections.

There are over 800 species of ticks, 100 of which are important to man and animals because of economic losses or disease transmission. Fortunately in the United States, only about 12 species are economically important because they transmit disease organisms (viral, bacterial, protozoan, and rickettsial) or cause economic losses to ...


G93-1129 Cockroaches And Their Control, Shripat T. Kamble, David L. Keith Jan 1993

G93-1129 Cockroaches And Their Control, Shripat T. Kamble, David L. Keith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides information on common cockroaches found in Nebraska, and management strategies, including prevention, sanitation, trapping and use of insecticides.

At the height of its popularity many years ago, millions of Americans could hum or sing the song, "La Cucaracha".... The Cockroach. But singing is usually the farthest thing from one's mind when these hardy pests become invaders.

Cockroaches are the most important insect pests in Nebraska households and public places. These insects are oval, flat-bodied, dark colored, with chewing mouth parts, three pairs of legs and usually two pairs of wings. All roaches have three stages in ...


G93-1183 Butterfly Gardening, Dale T. Lindgren, Stephen M. Spomer, Amy Greving Jan 1993

G93-1183 Butterfly Gardening, Dale T. Lindgren, Stephen M. Spomer, Amy Greving

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide outlines planting schemes and arrangements that will help attract butterflies to a garden area.

Butterflies can be found in almost any part of Nebraska, from the Pine Ridge's coniferous forests and across the grasslands of the Sandhills to the deciduous forests along the Missouri River. Watching butterflies, much like bird watching or observing wildflowers has become a popular and enjoyable pastime. Since many natural butterfly habitats have been lost to urbanization and other development, some environmental organizations have incorporated butterfly conservation into their programs. Many people are taking a personal interest in attracting these fascinating insects to ...


G93-1136 Potato Leafhopper Management In Alfalfa, Stephen D. Danielson, Keith J. Jarvi Jan 1993

G93-1136 Potato Leafhopper Management In Alfalfa, Stephen D. Danielson, Keith J. Jarvi

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide explains how to detect and manage potato leafhoppers to minimize alfalfa damage.

The potato leafhopper is capable of causing serious damage to alfalfa in Nebraska. This insect overwinters in the gulf states and migrates northward in the spring, usually in April or early May. During the summer months, several generations develop while feeding primarily on legumes such as alfalfa and clover. Although an occasional host, soybeans rarely suffer economic damage, particularly with the pubescent (i.e. hairy) soybean varieties that are commonly grown today. Infested potatoes also can sustain economic damage from this insect. Generally, the potato leafhopper ...