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Nf05-652 Soybean Rust Fungicide Use Guidelines For Nebraska, Loren J. Giesler, John A. Wilson, Jennifer M. Rees Jan 2005

Nf05-652 Soybean Rust Fungicide Use Guidelines For Nebraska, Loren J. Giesler, John A. Wilson, Jennifer M. Rees

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

While the impact that soybean rust will have on Nebraska's soybean crop is unknown, producers should be prepared to manage the disease. When soybean rust occurs or is expected to occur shortly in Nebraska, growers can use the decision-aid flow chart on page 2 of this NebFact to determine whether to treat and, if treating, which class of fungicide (chlorothalonil, strobilurin, or triazole) to use.


G04-1537 Wind Erosion And Its Control, Drew J. Lyon, John A. Smith Jan 2004

G04-1537 Wind Erosion And Its Control, Drew J. Lyon, John A. Smith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses how wind erosion occurs and presents methods for reducing wind erosion on land devoted to crop production. Wind erosion is widespread on agricultural land in the Great Plains, particularly in the semi-arid regions. Wind erosion physically removes the most fertile part of the soil (organic matter, clay, and silt) and lowers soil productivity. This loss in productivity increases the costs of producing crops. Blowing soil can reduce seedling survival and growth, depress crop yields, and increase the susceptibility of plants to certain types of stress, including diseases.


G03-1521 Using Corn Hybrid Yield Data To Improve Selection Of Rapidly Changing Hybrids, Robert N. Klein, Lenis Alton Nelson, Roger Wesley Elmore Jan 2003

G03-1521 Using Corn Hybrid Yield Data To Improve Selection Of Rapidly Changing Hybrids, Robert N. Klein, Lenis Alton Nelson, Roger Wesley Elmore

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Choosing the proper hybrid can greatly enhance crop production profitability. This NebGuide illustrates how to use corn hybrid test data and adjust it to your farm when selecting seed. How often should you change hybrids? An Auburn University study compared the top corn hybrids from a 3-year regional trial (114 bushel average) with the top hybrids from the previous year's test (119 bushel average). Since the yields went from 114 to 119 bushels - a 5 bushel increase - using data from 11 locations and 8 years, should we expect twice that difference - a 10 bushel increase - with yields of 228 ...


Ec02-178 Precision Agriculture: On-The-Go Vehicle-Based Soil Sensors, Viacheslav I. Adamchuk, Paul J. Jasa Jan 2002

Ec02-178 Precision Agriculture: On-The-Go Vehicle-Based Soil Sensors, Viacheslav I. Adamchuk, Paul J. Jasa

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Imagine that you are entering an unknown field and would like to estimate the productivity of the unfamiliar soil. You may pick up a handful of soil to evaluate its color and texture. You also can feel how difficult it is to break a clod apart, roll it into a ball or press out a ribbon. After repeating this procedure at different field locations, soil depths and times, you get a feeling of both spatial and temporal soil variability. Some of this variability can explain the non-uniformity of crop yield. If you collect soil samples and send them to a ...


G02-1451 Climate Change And Winter Wheat: What Can We Expect In The Future?, Albert Weiss, Cynthia J. Hays Jan 2002

G02-1451 Climate Change And Winter Wheat: What Can We Expect In The Future?, Albert Weiss, Cynthia J. Hays

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide will explain how climate changes at the end of this century will affect winter wheat production. Although it doesn't make daily headlines, global warming that results from climate changes will present challenges for current and future generations. While scientists may disagree about what causes current climate change, there is general agreement that a change is happening now and will continue for some time. As humans, it doesn't matter much whether the air temperature is 92 degrees or 97 degrees - either way we tend to be uncomfortable. However, a 5 degree temperature change can have dramatic implications ...


Ec02-1763 How Windbreaks Work, James R. Brandle, Laurie Hodges, Xinhua Zhou Jan 2002

Ec02-1763 How Windbreaks Work, James R. Brandle, Laurie Hodges, Xinhua Zhou

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Windbreaks are barriers used to reduce and redirect wind. They usually consist of trees and shrubs but also may be perennial or annual crops and grasses, fences, or other materials. The reduction in wind speed behind a windbreak modifies the environmental conditions or microclimate in this sheltered zone.


Ec02-173 Spotted And Diffuse Knapweed, Neil L. Heckman, Ryan M. Goss, Roch E. Gaussoin, Stevan Z. Knezevic, John L. Lindquist Jan 2002

Ec02-173 Spotted And Diffuse Knapweed, Neil L. Heckman, Ryan M. Goss, Roch E. Gaussoin, Stevan Z. Knezevic, John L. Lindquist

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Spotted knapweed (Centaure amaculosa Lam. = C. biebersteinii DC.) and diffuse knapweed (C.diffusa Lam.) are two of Nebraska’s seven noxious weeds. They are also noxious in at least 17 other states. These are closely related species that are well adapted to a variety of habitats including open forests, rangelands and pastures, Conservation Reserve Program lands, roadsides, and ditch banks. Centaurea is a large genus of over 400 species, 32 of which are common weeds of the United States and several of which [e.g., yellowstar thistle, C. solstitalis L, and Russian knapweed, C. repens L. =Acroptilon repens (L.) DC ...


Ec02-172 Plumeless Thistle, Kara L. Hilgenfeld, Alex Martin Jan 2002

Ec02-172 Plumeless Thistle, Kara L. Hilgenfeld, Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Plumeless thistle (Carduus acanthoides L.) is one of seven noxious weeds in Nebraska. An introduced invasive broadleaf weed native to Europe and Asia, plumeless thistle currently infests about 65,000 acres in Nebraska. Infestations of plumeless thistle may reduce productivity of pastures and rangeland, where infestations tend to be the largest. Plumeless thistle competes with and suppresses growth of desirable species. Heavy infestations prevent livestock from grazing the area and lighter infestations prevent livestock from eating plants growing near the thistle. Estimates place the annual loss in Nebraska agricultural production due to plumeless thistle at $162,000. Although plumeless thistle ...


Ec02-171 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson Jan 2002

Ec02-171 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Canada thistle [Cirsium arvense (L) Scop.] is one of the seven species defined by Nebraska law as a noxious weed. At least 35 other states also have determined by law that Canada thistle poses a threat to the economic, social, and aesthetic well-being of the residents of their state. Canada thistle is probably the most widespread of all the thistle species and many land managers consider it the most difficult thistle to control. In Nebraska, Canada thistle is estimated to infest 460,000 acres.


Ec02-177 Purple Loosestrife, Stevan Z. Knezevic Jan 2002

Ec02-177 Purple Loosestrife, Stevan Z. Knezevic

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is an introduced invasive weed that isover running thousands of acres of wetlands and waterways in the Midwest. Once purple loosestrife invades a wetland, natural habitat is lost and the productivity of native plant and animal communities is severely reduced. These losses in turn interfere with various levels of the ecosystem and area recreational activities such as fishing, boating and hunting, diminishing revenue from tourism and impairing the social and economic well being of local communities. A single control measure cannot provide long-term, sustainable control of this weed. An integrated approach, using a variety of mechanical ...


Ec02-176 Musk Thistle, Fred Roeth, Steven R. Melvin, Irvin L. Schleufer Jan 2002

Ec02-176 Musk Thistle, Fred Roeth, Steven R. Melvin, Irvin L. Schleufer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Musk thistle (Carduus nutans L.) is an introduced invasive broadleaf weed native to Europe, North Africa, and Asia. In these areas it is a minor weed because natural enemies keep its population low. When the plant was introduced into North America, its natural enemies were left behind. Without these natural checks, the thistle is able to thrive and compete with native vegetation.

Musk thistles aggressively invade all lands in Nebraska. Typical cropland weed control methods are very effective against them; however, land with permanent cover (pasture, range, roadway ditches and wasteland) that is not tilled or treated with a herbicide ...


Ec02-174 Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady F. Kappler Jan 2002

Ec02-174 Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady F. Kappler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Leafy spurge is an invasive weed that infests over three million acres in the northern Great Plains and the prairie provinces of Canada. It is commonly found in rangelands, pastures, roadsides, rights-of-way, and woodlands. Leafy spurge can reduce rangeland and pasture carrying capacity by as much as 75 percent because it competes with forages and cattle avoid grazing areas infested with this weed. In North Dakota where leafy spurge infests about 900,000 acres, estimates of direct and indirect losses exceed $100 million each year. In Nebraska, the direct loss in forage value attributed to leafy spurge has been estimated ...


Ec01-107 Nebraska Proso, Sunflower, Pulse Crop, Amaranth, Oat And Spring Wheat Variety Tests 2001, David D. Baltensperger, Glen E. Frickel, Robert N. Klein, James Krall, Jack Cecil, James Hain, Clair Stymiest, John Rickertson, Jerry Nachtman, Lenis Alton Nelson, P. Stephen Baenziger, B. Todd Campbell Jan 2001

Ec01-107 Nebraska Proso, Sunflower, Pulse Crop, Amaranth, Oat And Spring Wheat Variety Tests 2001, David D. Baltensperger, Glen E. Frickel, Robert N. Klein, James Krall, Jack Cecil, James Hain, Clair Stymiest, John Rickertson, Jerry Nachtman, Lenis Alton Nelson, P. Stephen Baenziger, B. Todd Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of spring small grain trials grown throughout Nebraska, and proso, amaranth, sunflower, and pulse crop variety trials conducted by the Panhandle Research and Extension Center, Scottsbluff, and the High Plains Agricultural Laboratory, Sidney. Conduct of the experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricutlural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


Ec01-797 Filtration And Maintenance: Considerations For Subsurface Drip Irrigation (Sdi), Brian Benham, Jose O. Payero Jan 2001

Ec01-797 Filtration And Maintenance: Considerations For Subsurface Drip Irrigation (Sdi), Brian Benham, Jose O. Payero

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

When using Subsurface Drip Irrigation (SDI) systems, it is important to prevent clogging problems before they occur. The best prevention plan includes an effective filtration and water treatment strategy. Depending on the water source and its quality, various combinations of sand separation, filtration and chemical treatments may be required and are discussed here in this extension circular.


Ec01-105 Nebraska Corn Hybrid Tests 2001, Lenis Alton Nelson, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall Jan 2001

Ec01-105 Nebraska Corn Hybrid Tests 2001, Lenis Alton Nelson, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of corn hybrid performance tests conducted by the Agronomy Department and the Northeast, South Central, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers of Nebraska and University of Wyoming at Torrington. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


Nf00-423 Disease Management Guide For Home Garden Vegetables, John E. Watkins Jan 2000

Nf00-423 Disease Management Guide For Home Garden Vegetables, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses disease management guidelines for home garden vegetables.


Ec00-1879 Sorghum Ergot In The Northern Great Plains, Jim Stack Jan 2000

Ec00-1879 Sorghum Ergot In The Northern Great Plains, Jim Stack

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sorghum is grown throughout Nebraska on approximately 0.6 million acres of land. It is grown as a forage crop as well as a grain crop. There is no significant commercial seed production in Nebraska. Grain sorghum is used domestically as livestock feed, in ethanol production, and to a limited extent as a food crop.

Grain sorghum is also exported to several countries. All sorghum hybrids (grain and forage) are susceptible to ergot disease. Ergot is a disease that impacts sorghum production directly by infecting unfertilized flowers and preventing seed development. Ergot also impacts sorghum production indirectly. Affected fields with ...


G1419 Community Supported Agriculture, Paul Swanson Jan 2000

G1419 Community Supported Agriculture, Paul Swanson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide explains what community supported agriculture is, how it works and what producers will need to do to participate.

Most Nebraskans have not heard of Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) but the concept is about three decades old in Japan and Europe and about 10-15 years old on the east coast of the United States.

In Japan, because of continued loss of farmland to urbanization and the migration of farmers to the city, a group of women approached local farm families with the idea of direct marketing produce from area farms to urban residents. This created an alternative distribution system ...


Nf99-404 Income Generation Using Alternative Crops, Roger D. Uhlinger, Laurie Hodges Jan 1999

Nf99-404 Income Generation Using Alternative Crops, Roger D. Uhlinger, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact examines considerations for utilizing alternative crops for income generation.


Nf99-367 Adult Western Corn Rootworm Insecticide Resistance In Nebraska, Robert Wright, Lance Meinke, Blair Siegfried Jan 1999

Nf99-367 Adult Western Corn Rootworm Insecticide Resistance In Nebraska, Robert Wright, Lance Meinke, Blair Siegfried

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses insecticide resistance by adult western corn rootworms in Nebraska.


Ec98-1562 Corn Insects: Quick Reference, Robert J. Wright, J. F. Witkowski Jan 1998

Ec98-1562 Corn Insects: Quick Reference, Robert J. Wright, J. F. Witkowski

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This Extension Circular provides abbreviated information on the economically important corn insect pests found in Nebraska. It provides a brief description of the insect, damage symptoms, incidence, sampling scheme, economic thresholds and available references for each pest.


G96-1362 Soil Temperatures And Spring Planting Dates, Steven J. Meyer, Allen L. Dutcher Jan 1998

G96-1362 Soil Temperatures And Spring Planting Dates, Steven J. Meyer, Allen L. Dutcher

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Dates on which soil temperatures reach a threshold value are presented as a spring planting guide for agronomic and horticultural producers.

For a seed to germinate it must have good contact with the soil and be placed in a favorable soil environment. A good soil environment is one that has suitable soil temperature, adequate soil moisture, good aeration, and for certain seeds, light. Conditions necessary for germination depend on the species and variety of seed being planted. Alone, none of these factors guarantee germination; rather it is the interaction of these factors that affects seed germination.

In Nebraska, soil moisture ...


G98-1777 Windbreak Renovation, James R. Brandle, Jon Wilson, Craig Stange, Mike Kuhns Jan 1998

G98-1777 Windbreak Renovation, James R. Brandle, Jon Wilson, Craig Stange, Mike Kuhns

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Windbreaks are an integral part of many farms and ranches and provide critical protection for farmsteads, livestock and crops. Unfortunately, many windbreaks planted in the 1930s and 1940s are losing their effectiveness due to age, poor health or neglect. In some cases, the windbreak no longer has the necessary density to provide winter protection. In other cases, overcrowding may have reduced the health and vigor of the windbreak, or the windbreak may have been invaded by aggressive sod-forming grasses such as smooth brome, reducing tree growth. Whatever the reason, many older windbreaks need renovation.


G98-1356 Polyacrylamide – A Method To Reduce Soil Erosion, C. Dean Yonts, Brian Benham Jan 1998

G98-1356 Polyacrylamide – A Method To Reduce Soil Erosion, C. Dean Yonts, Brian Benham

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes polyacrylamide, what it is, how it can be used to reduce soil erosion due to, irrigation and what water management changes must be considered.

Topsoil loss can mean a long-term reduction in soil productivity, crop yield and the life expectancy of downstream storage reservoirs. In the short term, producers are faced with reuse pits to clean or a buildup of soil at the lower ends of fields which must be redistributed. Measures must be taken to reduce or eliminate soil erosion and sustain Nebraska's soil resource.


Ec98-826 1998 Nebraska Farm Custom Rates - Part Ii Jan 1998

Ec98-826 1998 Nebraska Farm Custom Rates - Part Ii

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Every two years a survey of custom operations is conducted to determine the current rates charged for specific machinery operations. The survey is divided into two parts: spring and summer operations, including planting and small grains harvest in Part I, and information about fall and miscellaneous operations in Part II.


Ec97-782 Water Quality Criteria For Irrigation, Glenn J. Hoffman Jan 1997

Ec97-782 Water Quality Criteria For Irrigation, Glenn J. Hoffman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In irrigated agriculture, the hazard of salt water is a constant threat. Poor-quality irrigation water is generally more concerning as the climate changes from humid to arid conditions. Salinity is not normally a threat where precipitation is a major source of salt-free water for crop production. Water entering the soil which is not stored or consumed by evapotranspiration moves through the crop root zone, eventually reaching the water table. This percolating process flushes (leaches) soluble salts. Less rainfall means smaller amounts of precipitation available to leach salts. In Nebraska, rainfall decreases from 30 inches in the east to 15 inches ...


Ec96-142 Crp Land Use Guide (Conservation Reserve Program), Douglas Anderson Jan 1996

Ec96-142 Crp Land Use Guide (Conservation Reserve Program), Douglas Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contracts held by Nebraska producers will begin to expire in 1996. Thousands of acres of grassland will be eligible for haying, grazing or to be returned to other uses. Land-use decisions made by owners and operators will impact the economic viability and long-term productivity of individual farms, as well as the region as a whole.

The intent of the CRP Land Use Guide is not to provide all the asnwers - in many instances we don't even know the questions. It is however, intended to provide an outline of the key issues you will face when ...


Ec96-780 Equipment Wheel Spacing For Ridge-Till And No-Till Row Crops, Robert D. Grisso, Paul J. Jasa, Alice J. Jones, Todd A. Peterson Jan 1996

Ec96-780 Equipment Wheel Spacing For Ridge-Till And No-Till Row Crops, Robert D. Grisso, Paul J. Jasa, Alice J. Jones, Todd A. Peterson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Use of ridge-till and no-till systems has increased dramatically since the early 1980s when ridge-planting equipment and conservation tillage cultivators became readily available. The ridge-till system involves the establishment and annual re-forming of permanent, single-row ridges into which crops are planted year after year. To obtain maximum productivity with the ridge-plant system (and many believe with no-till systems), all wheel traffic should be confined to interrows. Wheel traffic on ridges can alter the ridge profile and condition of crop residue. Ridge deformation or excessive tire sinkage can affect subsequent planter performance, crop emergence and the overall productivity of both ridge-till ...


G96-1281 Spring Freeze Probabilities, Steven J. Meyer, Allen L. Dutcher Jan 1996

G96-1281 Spring Freeze Probabilities, Steven J. Meyer, Allen L. Dutcher

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Spring freeze probabilities, based on 45 years of data, are examined for 48 locations in Nebraska. The effect of spring freezes on Nebraska's main crops is also discussed.

The potential of a late spring freeze is of great concern to farmers, gardeners, nurserymen, and other plant growers. A climatological analysis of spring freeze events across Nebraska can provide a measure of the risk involved with planting at a certain time of spring.


Nf96-249 Nitrogen Application Practices In Nebraska, William Miller, Ray Supalla, Benedict Juliano Jan 1996

Nf96-249 Nitrogen Application Practices In Nebraska, William Miller, Ray Supalla, Benedict Juliano

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses nitrogen application among Nebraska farmers.