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Full-Text Articles in Education

Nf05-653 Pyemotes Itch Mites, James A. Kalisch, David L. Keith, Alberto R. Broce Jan 2005

Nf05-653 Pyemotes Itch Mites, James A. Kalisch, David L. Keith, Alberto R. Broce

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Two North American Species of itch mites — the straw itch mite and the "oak leaf gall mite" (Family Pyemotidae) — are found in Nebraska and Kansas. The straw itch mite was known in the early 1900s as a nuisance pest after farm workers handled small grains. Wheat, oats, and barley were often infested with insects on which the itch mites fed, allowing them to reach large numbers by harvest. The oak leaf gall mite recently discovered in galls on pin oaks in Lincoln, Neb., and Manhattan, Kan., is believed to be a relatively recent introduction to the United States.

This NebFact ...


Nf05-646 Removing Skunk Odor, Stephen M. Vantassel, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Dennis M. Ferraro Jan 2005

Nf05-646 Removing Skunk Odor, Stephen M. Vantassel, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Dennis M. Ferraro

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Skunks are famous for their odorous defensive spray. When alarmed or threatened, skunks have been known to spray people, pets, and automobiles. They also spray in basements, garages, window wells, and under porches. The musk they spray is a yellow-tinted oily liquid. This NebFact discusses the general background, deodorizing treatment, home remedies and over-the-counter products, electric foggers and atomist sprayers, general first aid tips, and cautions for removing skunk odors around your home.


Nf328 A Guide To Grasshopper Control In Cropland, Gary L. Hein, John B. Campbell Jan 2004

Nf328 A Guide To Grasshopper Control In Cropland, Gary L. Hein, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses grasshopper damage to cropland, how to determine when control is required, and methods of control.


G1507 Summer Patch And Necrotic Ring Spot, John E. Watkins Jan 2003

G1507 Summer Patch And Necrotic Ring Spot, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the causes, predisposing conditions, and symptoms of summer patch and necrotic ring spot, and provides recommendations for their control.

Introduction

Two of the most destructive turfgrass patch diseases are summer patch and necrotic ring spot, both of which are present in Nebraska. The symptoms of necrotic ring spot and summer patch are essentially identical, making it difficult to distinguish the two apart in an affected turf. If the symptoms begin in May, necrotic ring spot is probably the cause; if they begin in July and August, then summer patch is suspect. In Nebraska summer patch is probably ...


Ec03-177 Noxious Weeds Of Nebraska: Purple Loosestrife, Stevan Z. Knezevic Jan 2003

Ec03-177 Noxious Weeds Of Nebraska: Purple Loosestrife, Stevan Z. Knezevic

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Purple loosestrife is an introduced invasive weed that is overrunning thousands of acres of wetlands and waterways in the Midwest. Once purple loosestrife invades a wetland, natural habitat is lost and the productivity of native plant and animal communities is severely reduced. This Extension Circular discusses the biology, identification, distribution and control of purple loosestrife.


Ec03-176 Noxious Weeds Of Nebraska: Musk Thistle, Fred Roeth, Steven R. Melvin, Irvin L. Schleufer Jan 2003

Ec03-176 Noxious Weeds Of Nebraska: Musk Thistle, Fred Roeth, Steven R. Melvin, Irvin L. Schleufer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Musk Thistle is an introduced invasive broadleaf weed native to Europe, North Africa, and Asia. In these areas it is a minor weed because natural enemies keep its population low. When the plant was introduced into North America, its natural enemies were left behind. Without these natural checks, the thistle is able to thrive and compete with native vegetation. This Extension Circular discusses the history, biology, identification, distribution and control of the musk thistle.


G03-1510 Using Burrow Builders For Pocket Gopher Control, Dallas R. Virchow, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Bruce Anderson Jan 2003

G03-1510 Using Burrow Builders For Pocket Gopher Control, Dallas R. Virchow, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Bruce Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Pocket gophers spend nearly their entire lives underground and may only appear aboveground when they excavate soil to the surface or when they disperse to new areas. Each animal moves tons of soil during a year and creates dozens of mounds, sometimes in the span of a few days.

This NebGuide discusses how to use tractor-drawn mechanical bait applications to manage pocket gophers.


G03-1526 Prevention And Control Of Rabbit Damage, Dallas R. Virchow, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Dennis M. Ferraro Jan 2003

G03-1526 Prevention And Control Of Rabbit Damage, Dallas R. Virchow, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Dennis M. Ferraro

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus spp.) and jackrabbits (Lepus spp.) are found in most of Nebraska. The eastern cottontail (S. floridanus) lives throughout the state while the desert cottontail (S. audubonii) lives only in western Nebraska. Black-tailed (L. californicus) and white-tailed jackrabbits (L. townsendii) are most common in the western two-thirds of Nebraska.

This NebGuides describes how to identify rabbit damage and recommends proper methods of control, such as fencing, habitat modification, repellents, trapping, and shooting to reduce damage to tolerable levels.


G03-1522 Damping Off Of Seedlings And Transplants, Laurie Hodges Jan 2003

G03-1522 Damping Off Of Seedlings And Transplants, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The shift toward more ecological means of pest control is a driving force in research and in growers' fields. Growers need to understand how the various pathogens causing plant disease respond to environmental conditions and cultural practices — what keeps the level of disease below an economic threshold and how these conditions can be developed and maintained for more sustainable production.

This NebGuide provides information on two common pathogens that cause seedling disease (damping off) in many crops. Although vegetable production is used in the examples, the principles apply to many cropping systems.


Ec02-174 Noxious Weeds Of Nebraska: Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady Kappler Jan 2002

Ec02-174 Noxious Weeds Of Nebraska: Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady Kappler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Leafy spurge is an invasive weed that infests over three million acres in the northern Great Plains and the prairie provinces of Canada. It is commonly found in rangelands, pastures, roadsides, rights-of-way, and woodlands. Leafy spurge can reduce rangeland and pasture carrying capacity by as much as 75 percent because it competes with forages and cattle avoid grazing areas infested with this weed.

This Extension Circular discusses the biology, identification, distribution and control of leafy spurge.


G02-1476 Prairie Dogs And Their Control, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Dallas Virchow, John Hobbs Jan 2002

G02-1476 Prairie Dogs And Their Control, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Dallas Virchow, John Hobbs

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Black-tailed prairie dogs are stocky, burrowing rodents that are members of the squirrel family. They are the only species of prairie dog native to Nebraska and they live across the western three-fourths of the state. They cause problems, however, when they conflict with livestock ranching and other land uses, or cause a threat to human health and safety.

This NebGuide provides information on the life history and legal status of black-tailed prairie dogs and prevention and control of the damage they can cause.


G02-1445 Understanding Vaccines, Dicky D. Griffin, Steve Ensley, David R. Smith, Grant Dewell Jan 2002

G02-1445 Understanding Vaccines, Dicky D. Griffin, Steve Ensley, David R. Smith, Grant Dewell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide explains the basics of vaccine value, the differences between types of vaccines used in animals, and discusses vaccine selection and vaccination program development.

Vaccines are an important part of disease prevention and control. Like insurance, vaccines come at a cost, including the price of the vaccine, labor to administer the vaccine, localized tissue damage from vaccine injections, and increased metabolic demand of the animal causing potential performance loss during the time the animal is developing a proper immune response. The increased metabolic demand can cause the animal to look depressed and therefore may be confused with illness. This ...


G646 Sphaeropsis Tip Blight Of Pines, Loren J. Giesler Jan 2000

G646 Sphaeropsis Tip Blight Of Pines, Loren J. Giesler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The symptoms and identification, disease cycle and control of Sphaeropsis tip blight.

Browning and death of tips is quite common in older, well-established pine plantings. Such damage is often due to Sphaeropsis tip blight, a fungal disease caused by Sphaeropsis sapinea (syn. Diplodia pinea). Infection kills major branches and may even kill the entire tree under severe disease pressure.

Sphaeropsis sapinea can infect young trees, but the disease becomes increasingly more common and destructive as trees approach 30 years of age. Tip blight commonly occurs in landscape, windbreak and park plantings; but is seldom found in natural pine stands. Several ...


Ec99-1563 Corn Rootworm Management, Robert J. Wright, Lance J. Meinke, Keith J. Jarvi Jan 1999

Ec99-1563 Corn Rootworm Management, Robert J. Wright, Lance J. Meinke, Keith J. Jarvi

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Corn rootworms (Diabrotica spp.) are one of the most economically important corn insects in Nebraska. The western corn rootworm, D. virgifera virgifera LeConte, and the northern corn rootworm, D. barberi Smith and Lawrence, are the most economically important rootworm species in Nebraska. A third species, the southern corn rootworm, D. undecimpunctata howardi Barber, causes little economic damage to corn and has not been shown to overwinter in Nebraska. This publication will focus on the biology and management of the western and northern corn rootworms.


G99-1389 Cultural Practices To Improve Weed Control In Winter Wheat, Gail A. Wicks, Alex Martin, Drew J. Lyon Jan 1999

G99-1389 Cultural Practices To Improve Weed Control In Winter Wheat, Gail A. Wicks, Alex Martin, Drew J. Lyon

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide explains the influence of cultural practices on weeds in winter wheat. Precipitation and temperature greatly influence crop and weed growth in the semiarid areas of the central Great Plains. Precipitation in Nebraska varies from 14 to 24 inches where fallow is practiced. The purpose of fallow is to control weeds and, when not cropping a field, to store water and stabilize winter wheat fields. With good prewheat-fallow techniques, sufficient soil moisture is usually available to establish winter wheat. Peak rainfall occurs in May and June during the pollination and grain-filling period of winter wheat. The latter part of ...


G99-1377 Tree Squirrels And Their Control, Dallas R. Virchow, Scott E. Hygnstrom, John M. Hobbs Jan 1999

G99-1377 Tree Squirrels And Their Control, Dallas R. Virchow, Scott E. Hygnstrom, John M. Hobbs

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes tree squirrel biology and behavior and characterizes the types of damage they cause. It suggests control methods and equipment and describes legal restrictions.

Tree squirrels are known for their bushy tails and their ability to climb high into trees. The eastern fox squirrel (Sciurus niger) is the most common tree squirrel in Nebraska. It is common throughout the state. The eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) occurs only in the extreme southeastern portion of Nebraska. The southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans) occurs uncommonly and only in southeastern Nebraska in the forested Missouri River bluffs and, possibly, along associated ...


Mp99-40 The Economics And Control Of Insects Affecting Beef Cattle In Nebraska (Northern Great Plains), John B. Campbell, Gustave D. Thomas Jan 1999

Mp99-40 The Economics And Control Of Insects Affecting Beef Cattle In Nebraska (Northern Great Plains), John B. Campbell, Gustave D. Thomas

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Livestock insect control should be considered an integral part of an efficient beef herd health program.

This extension circular discusses the behavior and control of these major insect parasites of range and pasture cattle in Nebraska: stable fly, horn fly, face fly, cattle grubs, cattle lice, cattle scabies, horse and deer flies, mosquito, black fly, and biting midges (gnats).


Nf98-377 Kentucky Bluegrass Seed Production Management In Western Nebraska And Eastern Wyoming, Rebecca L. Harms, David D. Baltensperger, Robert C. Shearman, Dan Laursen, Roger Hammons, Tony Merrigan, Jim Krall, C. Dean Yonts Jan 1998

Nf98-377 Kentucky Bluegrass Seed Production Management In Western Nebraska And Eastern Wyoming, Rebecca L. Harms, David D. Baltensperger, Robert C. Shearman, Dan Laursen, Roger Hammons, Tony Merrigan, Jim Krall, C. Dean Yonts

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses management practicies related to Kentucky Bluegrass seed production.


Nf97-334 Making Decisions: Buying A Microwave Oven, Virginia Peart, Shirley Niemeyer Jan 1997

Nf97-334 Making Decisions: Buying A Microwave Oven, Virginia Peart, Shirley Niemeyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact examines factors to consider when purchasing a microwave.


Nf97-342 Chinch Bugs In Buffalograss And Zoysiagrass Turf, Frederick P. Baxendale, Thomas E. Eickhoff, Tiffany M. Heng-Moss Jan 1997

Nf97-342 Chinch Bugs In Buffalograss And Zoysiagrass Turf, Frederick P. Baxendale, Thomas E. Eickhoff, Tiffany M. Heng-Moss

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has information on identifying, counting, and managing buffalograss chinch bugs, Blissus sp.


Nf97-327 A Guide To Grasshopper Control In Yards And Gardens, Gary L. Hein, John B. Campbell, Ronald C. Seymour Jan 1997

Nf97-327 A Guide To Grasshopper Control In Yards And Gardens, Gary L. Hein, John B. Campbell, Ronald C. Seymour

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses grasshopper damage to yards and gardens, strategies to reduce the problem, and methods to achieve control.


Nf97-324 Returning Crp Land To Crops: Cool-Season Grass Management/Cropping Suggestions, Keith J. Jarvi, Melinda Mcvey Mccluskey, William L. Kranz, Steven D. Rasmussen, Charles A. Shapiro, David P. Shelton, John F. Witkowski, Richard T. Clark, Terry Gompert, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Alex Martin, David Holshouser Jan 1997

Nf97-324 Returning Crp Land To Crops: Cool-Season Grass Management/Cropping Suggestions, Keith J. Jarvi, Melinda Mcvey Mccluskey, William L. Kranz, Steven D. Rasmussen, Charles A. Shapiro, David P. Shelton, John F. Witkowski, Richard T. Clark, Terry Gompert, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Alex Martin, David Holshouser

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact contains suggestions for returning CRP land to crop production.


G97-1321 Powdery Mildew Of Landscape Ornamentals, John E. Watkins Jan 1997

G97-1321 Powdery Mildew Of Landscape Ornamentals, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Powdery mildew can diminish the beauty of landscape ornamentals; however, it can be controlled through cultural practices or chemical alternatives.

Powdery mildew is the name for the grayish white powdery coating of fungus mycelium and masses of spores growing on plant leaves, shoots and flowers. This disease is caused by a distinct group of similar fungi that attacks a wide variety of plants. Lilac, zinnia and many other flowers and shrubs can be damaged. Although plants infected with powdery mildew rarely die, the disease detracts from the natural beauty of ornamentals. Damage ranges from an unsightly white powdery coating on ...


G97-1327 Cedar-Apple And Related Rusts Of Apple And Ornamentals, Don Steinegger, Jane A. Christensen Jan 1997

G97-1327 Cedar-Apple And Related Rusts Of Apple And Ornamentals, Don Steinegger, Jane A. Christensen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Discussion of complex inter-species disease life cycle in junipers and apple trees, description of symptoms, control measures, and lists of varieties of species resistant to cedar-apple rust and related rusts.

Cedar-apple rust is a disease that causes substantial injury to apple and crabapple trees in Nebraska. The disease is caused by the fungus Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae and occurs wherever apples and junipers are grown in close proximity.


Nf97-332 Contacts For Environmental Issues Affecting Residences Web Sites And Toll-Free And Other Numbers, Shirley Niemeyer Jan 1997

Nf97-332 Contacts For Environmental Issues Affecting Residences Web Sites And Toll-Free And Other Numbers, Shirley Niemeyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has information on toll-free and other numbers and addresses dealing with questions relating to the environment and households.


Nf97-328 A Guide To Grasshopper Control In Cropland (Revised May 2004), Gary L. Hein, John B. Campbell Jan 1997

Nf97-328 A Guide To Grasshopper Control In Cropland (Revised May 2004), Gary L. Hein, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Grasshoppers have been a major concern to farmers and ranchers since Nebraska was first settled. The potential for devastation, while still serious, is not as great as it was 100 years ago because many of the prime grasshopper breeding areas along the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains are now under tillage. Statewide, grasshopper populations fluctuate in cycles with large numbers occurring for two to four years, followed by moderate numbers for several years.

This NebFact discusses grasshopper damage to cropland, how to determine when control is required and methods of control.


Nf96-302 Pillbugs And Sowbugs, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1996

Nf96-302 Pillbugs And Sowbugs, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has information on pillbugs and sowbugs.


G96-1310 Ornamental Grasses In Nebraska Landscapes (Revised May 1999), Don Steinegger, John C. Fech, Dale T. Lindgren, Anne Streich Jan 1996

G96-1310 Ornamental Grasses In Nebraska Landscapes (Revised May 1999), Don Steinegger, John C. Fech, Dale T. Lindgren, Anne Streich

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the selection of and care for ornamental grasses.

Although grasses are an important component of Great Plains flora, Midwesterners have only recently incorporated them into landscape plantings. Many homeowners are acquiring plants such as ornamental grasses because they tolerate or even benefit from lower application rates of nitrogen and pesticides. Ornamental grasses tolerate drought, wetness, and fluctuating winter temperatures. They are resistant to most diseases and insect pests and require minimum inputs of fertilizer. Because of these characteristics they are useful to gardeners interested in a low-input or sustainable landscape.


Nf96-303 Millipedes And Centipedes, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1996

Nf96-303 Millipedes And Centipedes, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has information on millipedes and centipedes.


G96-1302 Managing Varroa In The Midwest, Marion D. Ellis, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1996

G96-1302 Managing Varroa In The Midwest, Marion D. Ellis, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

There are important regional differences in varroa population dynamics and control. This NebGuide offers recommendations on varroa management for beekeepers in the Midwest.

Varroa management has become an essential aspect of successful beekeeping since the mite was first discovered in the United States in 1987. Unlike most parasites which coexist with their host, varroa eventually destroy honey bee colonies of European descent. A good understanding of this important bee parasite is essential for successful beekeeping.