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2006 Beef Cattle Report, Dennis R. Brink Jan 2006

2006 Beef Cattle Report, Dennis R. Brink

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication was prepared by the Animal Science staff, research technicians, unit managers, and crew involved in research programs at various locations across Nebraska. It deals with the results that were done in cow/calf, growing, beef feedlot (finishing) and beef products research.


G05-1582 How To Reduce Heat Stress In Dairy Cattle, Jeffrey F. Keown, Paul J. Kononoff, Richard J. Grant Jan 2005

G05-1582 How To Reduce Heat Stress In Dairy Cattle, Jeffrey F. Keown, Paul J. Kononoff, Richard J. Grant

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Four ways to reduce heat stress and maintain production and fertility in dairy cattle.

Heat stress is one of the leading causes of decreased production and fertility in Nebrasks dairy cattle during summer months. These losses are apparent in the decreased amount of milk shipped, increased days open and decreased breedings per conception. Some heat stress is unavoidable, but effects can be minimized if certain management practices are followed.


Ec05-185 Grazing Winter Wheat In Nebraska, Tom Holman, Drew J. Lyon, David D. Baltensperger, Ivan G. Rush, Ray Weed Jan 2005

Ec05-185 Grazing Winter Wheat In Nebraska, Tom Holman, Drew J. Lyon, David D. Baltensperger, Ivan G. Rush, Ray Weed

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Grazing cattle on winter wheat, often prior to grain harvest, is common throughout the southern Great Plains. Grazing generates about $50 million in income for Texas wheat producers and reduces the risk of growing wheat by providing a substantial income source other than grain. Benefits can be realized by grazing prior to the primary environmental risk period for drought, heat stress, and hail, all of which frequently reduce grain yield while having limited impact on forage production. Cattle also are grazed on winter wheat fields in western Nebraska and the surrounding region. Typically in Nebraska, fall forage would be used ...


G05-1587 Understandng Effective Fiber In Rations For Dairy Cattle, Paul J. Kononoff Jan 2005

G05-1587 Understandng Effective Fiber In Rations For Dairy Cattle, Paul J. Kononoff

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Fiber type, quality and length are key to herd health and production.

Fiber is a key component in dairy rations. When nutritionists are faced with herd challenges such as low milkfat tests, foot problems, or low feed conversions, ration fiber often is evaluated. Effective fiber depends on the type and amount of forages and nonforage fiber sources being fed, the particle size of those forages and the amount of available nonfiberous carbohydrates included in the diet.


G05-1583 How To Body Condition Score Dairy Animals, Jeffrey F. Keown Jan 2005

G05-1583 How To Body Condition Score Dairy Animals, Jeffrey F. Keown

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Routinely scoring the body condition of dairy animals can help detect potential problems that might cause a decrease in milk production.

As the production level of a herd increases, body condition scoring becomes more important. A routine program for body condition scoring can help detect potential health problems before they significantly reduce milk production. A herd of cattle in good body condition will produce more, and will be less susceptible to metabolic disorders, disease, mastitis and reproductive problems. Underconditioned cows are subject to health problems, and overconditioned cows are subject to calving difficulties, fatty liver syndrome and possible death.


G05-1573 Meat And Fabrication-Room Temperatures For Food Safety, Alejandro Amezquita, L. Wang, Harshavardhan Thippareddi, Dennis E. Burson, Curtis Weller Jan 2005

G05-1573 Meat And Fabrication-Room Temperatures For Food Safety, Alejandro Amezquita, L. Wang, Harshavardhan Thippareddi, Dennis E. Burson, Curtis Weller

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Within the last 20 years, several meat-borne pathogenic microorganisms have emerged in the United States, causing numerous outbreaks of disease and death, as well as drastic economical losses.

Guidelines in this NebGuide are suggested for controlling temperature of meat and meat products in fabrication rooms so as to prevent detrimental growth of meat-borne pathogens.


Ec05-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, 1960-2005, Darrell R. Mark, Dillon Feuz, Brad Heinrichs Jan 2005

Ec05-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, 1960-2005, Darrell R. Mark, Dillon Feuz, Brad Heinrichs

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This report contains historical price data for the major crops and livestock commodities produced in Nebraska. Prices received by producers are reported for 1960-2005 for most of the commodities.

The data was compiled from Nebraska Agricultural Statistics Service and Agricultural Prices, National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA; Oil Crops Situation and Outlook, Economic Research Service, USDA; Cotton and Wool Outlook, Economic Research Service, USDA; and Livestock and Grain Market News, Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. Sources of prices for each commodity are indicated on the tables.


Ec05-835 Hedging And Basis Considerations For Feeder Cattle Livestock Risk Protection Insurance, Darrell R. Mark Jan 2005

Ec05-835 Hedging And Basis Considerations For Feeder Cattle Livestock Risk Protection Insurance, Darrell R. Mark

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) Insurance for feeder cattle is a price-risk management tool available to feeder cattle producers with cattle in Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. LRP indemnifies against declines in feeder cattle sales prices, as determined by the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) Feeder Cattle Can Index, which represents a national average cash feeder steer price.

This extension circular examines historical LRP basis and demonstrates its use in hedgling with LRP.


Ec04-835 Hedging And Basis Considerations For Feeder Cattle Livestock Risk Protection Insurance, Darrell R. Mark Jan 2004

Ec04-835 Hedging And Basis Considerations For Feeder Cattle Livestock Risk Protection Insurance, Darrell R. Mark

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) insurnace for feeder cattle is a price-risk management tool initially offered in June 2003 to feeder cattle producers in Nebraska, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Nevada, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming.

This extension circular examines historical LRP basia dn demonstrates its use in hedging with LRP.


Ec03-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, 1960-2003, Darrell R. Mark, Dillon Feuz, Roger Selley, Tina N. Barrett Jan 2003

Ec03-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, 1960-2003, Darrell R. Mark, Dillon Feuz, Roger Selley, Tina N. Barrett

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This report contains historical price data for the major crops and livestock commodities produced in Nebraska. Prices received by producers are reported for 1960-2002 for most of the commodities.

The data was compiled from Nebraska Agricultural Statistics Services and Agricultural Prices, National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA; Oil Crops Situation and Outlook, Economic Research Service, USDA; Cotton and Wool Outlook, Economic Research Service, USDA; and Livestock and Grain Market News, Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. Sources of prices for each commodity are indicated on the tables.


Cc02-426 Achieving Success With A Business Plan: Case Study Of A Cow/Calf Business Plan, Jody Wichmann, John Hanson, H. Douglas Jose Jan 2002

Cc02-426 Achieving Success With A Business Plan: Case Study Of A Cow/Calf Business Plan, Jody Wichmann, John Hanson, H. Douglas Jose

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication is a case study of a cow/calf business plan. It covers the business organization; history and overview of the operation; the operation layout; mission statement and goals; present business, legal and contractual situations; production, financial, marketing and personnel situations; job description, salary, benefits and labor training; and personnel summary.


Ec02-830 Costs Of Cattle Fencing For Grazing Areas, Roger K. Wilson, Richard T. Clark Jan 2002

Ec02-830 Costs Of Cattle Fencing For Grazing Areas, Roger K. Wilson, Richard T. Clark

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication is an update to an earlier version: Livestock Fencing Cost and Information. Costs for fencing have increased since that time even though the fencing technology is similar.

This publication addresses only the cost of building fences. There are other considerations that may impact the final cost of a fencing project such as site preparation, removal of old fence, building new fences, new fence boundary surveys, and installation.


Ec02-1550 Nebraska Management Guide For Arthropod Pests Of Livestock And Horses, John B. Campbell Jan 2002

Ec02-1550 Nebraska Management Guide For Arthropod Pests Of Livestock And Horses, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Understanding the differences in insecticide formulations is important to selecting the right one for the job. This publication discusses the different insecticides and ways of treating your animals. They include: dusts, emulsifiable concentrates, emulsifiable livestock insecticides, flowables (thick fluids mixed with water), soluble powders, wettable powders, and water dispersible liquids. Insecticides listed in this publication are considered safe when used according to label directions.


Ec01-150 Range Judging Handbook And Contest Guide For Nebraska, James T. Nichols, Peter N. Jensen Jan 2001

Ec01-150 Range Judging Handbook And Contest Guide For Nebraska, James T. Nichols, Peter N. Jensen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Range judging contests can be a challenging and effective learning tool for everyone - youth, adults, beginners, professionals - whether from rural or urban areas. This circular provides information about Nebraska's rangelands and grasslands. It is designed to help individuals and teams prepare for range judging contests and to learn more about rangeland and its management. Each of the nine sections that follow corresponds to a section on the range judging scorecard used in contests.


Ec01-158 Integrating Management Objectives And Grazing Strategies On Semi-Arid Rangeland, Patrick E. Reece, Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht Jan 2001

Ec01-158 Integrating Management Objectives And Grazing Strategies On Semi-Arid Rangeland, Patrick E. Reece, Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Rangelands account for about half of Nebraska's total land area or about 24 million acres. Much of these expansive natural resource areas are in the semi-arid climatic region of Nebraska where grazing management decisions have a profound effect on ranch survival.

The educational object of this circular is to explain management practices that optimize the sustainability of rangeland-based enterprises. Additionally a decision-support tool is provided for selecting grazing systems best suited to livestock production and natural resource management objectives.


Ec01-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, Roger Selley, Dillon Feuz, Tina Barrett Jan 2001

Ec01-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, Roger Selley, Dillon Feuz, Tina Barrett

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This report contains historical price data for the major crops and livestock classes produced in Nebraska. Prices received by producers are reported for 1960-2000 or for the period listed in each table heading.

The data was compiled from Nebraska Agricultural Statistics, Nebraska Agricultural Statistics Service and Agricultural Prices, USDA; Livestock, Meat and Wool Market News, Livestock and Grain Market News, Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA; and from Agricultural Statistics Board, National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA. Each table indicates the price source.


Nf01-454 Information About Foot And Mouth Disease For Nebraska Residents, David R. Smith Jan 2001

Nf01-454 Information About Foot And Mouth Disease For Nebraska Residents, David R. Smith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is an extremely contagious viral disease of cloven-hooved animals such as cattle, pigs, sheep, and deer. The disease is not commonly fatal, but causes extreme production losses in affected herds. Clinical signs of the disease include lameness, excessive salivation, reluctance to eat, abortion and blister-like erosions on the mouth and feet. Affected animals are debilitated and may not recover to their original production levels. The disease has long been recognized as one of the most economically devastating diseases of livestock.


G00-1411 Biosecurity Basics For Cattle Operations And Good Management Practices (Gmp) For Controlling Infectious Diseases, Marilyn Buhman, Grant Dewell, Dicky D. Griffin Jan 2000

G00-1411 Biosecurity Basics For Cattle Operations And Good Management Practices (Gmp) For Controlling Infectious Diseases, Marilyn Buhman, Grant Dewell, Dicky D. Griffin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide introduces cattle producers to the concept of biosecurity and provides practical management recommendations for preventing and/or containing infectious disease.

Biosecurity

The goal of biosecurity is to stop transmission of disease-causing agents by preventing, minimizing or controlling cross-contamination of body fluids (feces, urine, saliva, etc.) between animals, animals to feed and animals to equipment that may directly or indirectly contact animals. Biosecurity management practices are designed to prevent the spread of disease by minimizing the movement of biologic organisms and their vectors (viruses, bacteria, rodents, flies, etc.) onto and within your operation. Biosecurity can be very difficult to ...


Ec00-279 Synchronizing Esetrus In Beef Cattle, Richard J. Rasby, Gene H. Deutscher Jan 2000

Ec00-279 Synchronizing Esetrus In Beef Cattle, Richard J. Rasby, Gene H. Deutscher

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Synchronization of estrus (heat) involves manipulating the estrous cycle of beef females in a herd so they can be bred at approximately the same time. There are several traditional protocols available for synchronizing estrus among beef females.

This extension circular discusses the programs and protocols used in synchronizing estrus in the beef cow.


Ec00-281 Body Condition Scoring Beef Cows: A Tool For Managing The Nutrition Program For Beef Herds, Richard J. Rasby, James A. Gosey, Don C. Adams Jan 2000

Ec00-281 Body Condition Scoring Beef Cows: A Tool For Managing The Nutrition Program For Beef Herds, Richard J. Rasby, James A. Gosey, Don C. Adams

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Body condition scores (BCS) describe the relative fatness of a cow through the use of a nine-point scale and is an effective management tool to evaluate nutrition status of the herd.

This extension circular describes the nine-point body condition scoring system, relationship between body condition and productivity of the cow herd, and use of body condition as a management tool to develop and monitor nutritional programs. Incorporation of body condition scoring as a management tool can increase the profit potential of the cow/calf enterprise.


G99-1393 Grazing Alfalfa, Jerry D. Volesky, Bruce Anderson Jan 1999

G99-1393 Grazing Alfalfa, Jerry D. Volesky, Bruce Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Grazing alfalfa may be a cost efficient means of harvest for some producers. This NebGuide explores alfalfa and alfalfa/grass options, varieties and stand establishment, and grazing and bloat management.

Alfalfa is the most productive and versatile forage legume grown in Nebraska. Cutting for hay or silage has been the traditional method of harvest, but many opportunities and options exist for grazing. With current technology and proper management, beef gain can exceed 1,000 pounds per acre with acceptable stand persistence.


Nf99-401 Nebraska Competitive Livestock Markets Act, J. David Aiken Jan 1999

Nf99-401 Nebraska Competitive Livestock Markets Act, J. David Aiken

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact offers the text of the Nebraska Competitive Livestock Markets Act.


G99-1394 Feeding Program: Quality Control Checklist, Rick J. Grant Jan 1999

G99-1394 Feeding Program: Quality Control Checklist, Rick J. Grant

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Use this check list to ensure that your feeding program is effective and profitable.

The following guidelines will help assure that your herd's feeding environment is optimal for maximum feed intake, milk production and cow comfort.


Nf99-403 Livestock Waste Management Act (Revised March 2001), J. David Aiken Jan 1999

Nf99-403 Livestock Waste Management Act (Revised March 2001), J. David Aiken

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The Livestock Waste Management Act requires all livestock operations with 300 animal units or more to be inspected by the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to determine whether livestock wastes contaminate surface or ground water. This NebFact discusses the following parts of the Livestock Waste Management Act: Act (how cited); Terms (defined); Livestock operation, exemption, livestock waste control facility, permit, restriction; Construction permit or operating permit (when required), livestock waste control facilities, classification, restrictions; Section (how construed); Cold water class A streams (designation); Permit (acknowledgment required); Livestock operation (request inspection, when, fees, department, duties); Permits (duration, modification); Permit (application ...


Mp99-40 The Economics And Control Of Insects Affecting Beef Cattle In Nebraska (Northern Great Plains), John B. Campbell, Gustave D. Thomas Jan 1999

Mp99-40 The Economics And Control Of Insects Affecting Beef Cattle In Nebraska (Northern Great Plains), John B. Campbell, Gustave D. Thomas

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Livestock insect control should be considered an integral part of an efficient beef herd health program.

This extension circular discusses the behavior and control of these major insect parasites of range and pasture cattle in Nebraska: stable fly, horn fly, face fly, cattle grubs, cattle lice, cattle scabies, horse and deer flies, mosquito, black fly, and biting midges (gnats).


G98-1353 Fed Cattle Pricing, Dillon M. Feuz, Ted C. Schroeder, Clement E. Ward Jan 1998

G98-1353 Fed Cattle Pricing, Dillon M. Feuz, Ted C. Schroeder, Clement E. Ward

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses pricing alternatives for fed cattle, including live weight, dressed weight and grid pricing. Pricing fed cattle is becoming more complex, requiring more time to evaluate pricing alternatives and marketing cattle. Is there one best pricing method? How are live weight, dressed weight, and grid or formula prices related? This NebGuide will provide answers to these and other questions about fed cattle pricing.


Ec98-278 Grazing Crop Residues, Richard J. Rasby, Roger Selley, Terry Klopfenstein Jan 1998

Ec98-278 Grazing Crop Residues, Richard J. Rasby, Roger Selley, Terry Klopfenstein

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraska has an abundance of crop residue available for late fall and winter grazing. However, several factors prevent the grazing of many fields, including the location of fields in relation to the cattle, the lack of shelter or appropriate fencing and water availability. Despite these limitations, residue grazing is an important resource to many cattle operations, primarily as either a winter feed resource for maintaining the breeding herd or putting weight on cull cows. Calves weaned in the fall can also be wintered on cornstalks if appropriate supplementation is used.


G98-1352 Issues To Consider When Selling Cattle On A Grid Or Formula, Dillon M. Feuz Jan 1998

G98-1352 Issues To Consider When Selling Cattle On A Grid Or Formula, Dillon M. Feuz

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses issues and problems associated with matching cattle to the appropriate market.

Recently there has been a much greater emphasis on improving the quality and consistency of beef. Cattle producers, breed associations, feed suppliers and beef packers have initiated value based pricing methods. Grid pricing, formula pricing, and strategic alliances are examples of these new value based pricing methods. While these pricing methods may differ substantially in the carcass and management traits they seek to reward or penalize, they all have one common feature: price is established on each individual animal.

The goals of the new pricing methods ...


G98-1351 Proper Injection Procedures For Cattle, Dicky D. Griffin, David R. Smith, Dale M. Grotelueschen Jan 1998

G98-1351 Proper Injection Procedures For Cattle, Dicky D. Griffin, David R. Smith, Dale M. Grotelueschen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes methods to maximize the effectiveness of injectable medications for cattle, while minimizing potential risks for the animal, the operator and the consumer. The key elements to giving proper injections are knowing why, when, where and how injectable medications should be used. Medications are commonly given to cattle as part of regular husbandry practices to improve health, control disease or increase productivity. Medications may be given by injection, by mouth (orally) or through the skin as a pour-on (topically). Injections are commonly given into the muscle (intramuscularly, or IM), under the skin (subcutaneously, or SC) or into the ...


Mp68 1996-98 Dairy Report Jan 1997

Mp68 1996-98 Dairy Report

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Annual Report of University of Nebraska-Lincoln Dairy Research for 1997-1998. Topics include:

Time of Initiating Dietary Fat Supplementaion on Lactation and Reproduction

A Soyhull:Soy Lecithin Soapstock Mixture for Early Lactation Dairy Cows

Nonenzymatically Browned Soybeans for Dairy Cattle

Feather and Blood Meal Combination for Lactating Dairy Cows

Impact of Nonfiber Carbohydrate Concentration on Forage Fiber Digestion

Sulfite Liquor-Treated Meat and Bone Meal for Dairy Cows

The OTHER Causes of Infectious Diseases

Test Day Genetic Evaluations

Income and Herdlife

Maternal Genetic and Cytoplasmic Effects in Dairy Cattle

Financial and Management Survey of Nebraska Dairy Producers

Free-Stall Design and Maintenance

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