Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 30 of 79

Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec07-103 2007 Fall Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger, Robert N. Klein, Bruce Anderson, Jerry D. Volesky, P. Stephen Baenziger, James Krall Jan 2007

Ec07-103 2007 Fall Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger, Robert N. Klein, Bruce Anderson, Jerry D. Volesky, P. Stephen Baenziger, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The 2006 wheat crop has faced more than the usual number of challenges. Western Nebraska was again faced with shortages of rainfall as well as wheat streak mosaic. Eastern Nebraska fared better, but some places had soil borne mosaic problems. Overall, the state yield was down but becasue of similar problems throughout the Great Plains, the price of wheat has remained strong. This circular is a progress report of variety trials conducted by personnel of the Agronomy Department, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers and their associated agricultural laboratories and the South Central Ag Lab. Conduct of experiments ...


Ec07-101 2007 Spring Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, Bruce Anderson, Robert N. Klein, Richard B. Ferguson, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall Jan 2007

Ec07-101 2007 Spring Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, Bruce Anderson, Robert N. Klein, Richard B. Ferguson, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of variety and hybrid performance tests conducted by the Agronomy/Horticulture Department, the Northeast, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers, the South Central Agricultural Laboratory as part of the University of Nebraska and University of Wyoming at Torrington. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service. The following pages include the results of our variety testing programs for many crop species throughtout the state. We hope you find this information useful as you make hybrid and variety decisions for ...


Ec06-103 Fall Seed Guide, 2007, Lenis Alton Nelson, Robert N. Klein, Bruce Anderson, P. Stephen Baenziger, Jerry Nachtman Jan 2006

Ec06-103 Fall Seed Guide, 2007, Lenis Alton Nelson, Robert N. Klein, Bruce Anderson, P. Stephen Baenziger, Jerry Nachtman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of variety trials conducted by personnel of the Agronomy Department, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers and their associated agricultural laboratories and the South Central Ag Laboratory. Conduct of experiments and publications of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


Ec06-155 Nutrient Management For Agronomic Crops In Nebraska, Richard B. Ferguson Jan 2006

Ec06-155 Nutrient Management For Agronomic Crops In Nebraska, Richard B. Ferguson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraska is blessed with fertile soil and vast supplies of groundwater which combine to create an environment well-suited to the production of corn, wheat, grain sorghum, alfalfa, edible beans, and other agronomic crops used for human or animal consumption.

This manual is a guide to nutrient use from all sources for the production of Nebraska's major agronomic crops: corn, winter wheat, grain sorghum, oats, alfalfa, dry edible beans, soybean, sugar beets, popcorn, sunflower, millet, potatoes, and cool and warm season grasses for hay and pasture. Part I of the manual contains information focusing on basic principles of soil fertility ...


Ec05-185 Grazing Winter Wheat In Nebraska, Tom Holman, Drew J. Lyon, David D. Baltensperger, Ivan G. Rush, Ray Weed Jan 2005

Ec05-185 Grazing Winter Wheat In Nebraska, Tom Holman, Drew J. Lyon, David D. Baltensperger, Ivan G. Rush, Ray Weed

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Grazing cattle on winter wheat, often prior to grain harvest, is common throughout the southern Great Plains. Grazing generates about $50 million in income for Texas wheat producers and reduces the risk of growing wheat by providing a substantial income source other than grain. Benefits can be realized by grazing prior to the primary environmental risk period for drought, heat stress, and hail, all of which frequently reduce grain yield while having limited impact on forage production. Cattle also are grazed on winter wheat fields in western Nebraska and the surrounding region. Typically in Nebraska, fall forage would be used ...


Ec05-101 Spring Seed Guide, 2006, Lenis Alton Nelson, Bruce Anderson, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall Jan 2005

Ec05-101 Spring Seed Guide, 2006, Lenis Alton Nelson, Bruce Anderson, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of variety and hybrid performance tests conducted by the Agronomy/Horticulture Department, the Northeast, West Central, and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers, the South Central Agricultural Laboratory as part of the University of Nebraska and University of Wyoming at Torrington. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


Ec05-130 Guide For Weed Management In Nebraska, Roch E. Gaussoin, Brady F. Kappler, Robert N. Klein, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Drew J. Lyon, Alex Martin, Fred Roeth, Gail A. Wicks, Robert G. Wilson, Robert A. Masters, Patrick J. Shea, Larry D. Schulze Jan 2005

Ec05-130 Guide For Weed Management In Nebraska, Roch E. Gaussoin, Brady F. Kappler, Robert N. Klein, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Drew J. Lyon, Alex Martin, Fred Roeth, Gail A. Wicks, Robert G. Wilson, Robert A. Masters, Patrick J. Shea, Larry D. Schulze

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

One of the major thrusts of all University of Nebraska weed science faculty is the Guide for Weed Management in Nebraska. This guide is not just the work of one or two people, rather it is a joint effort of all the authors to produce a comprehensive, information-packed resource. Each weed science faculty member is responsible for particular sections of the guide. The process of reviewing the current content, checking labels and research data and updating the content can be an extensive process. Each year new herbicide active ingredients and trade names are introduced and figuring out what a herbicide ...


Ec04-103 Fall Seed Guide, 2004, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, P. Stephen Baenziger, James Krall Jan 2004

Ec04-103 Fall Seed Guide, 2004, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, P. Stephen Baenziger, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of variety trials conducted by personnel of the Agronomy Department and the South Central, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers and their associated agricultural laboratories. Conduct of experiments and publications of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


Ec03-702 Precision Agriculture: Applications Of Remote Sensing In Site-Specific Management, Viacheslav I. Adamchuk, Richard L. Perk, James S. Schepers Jan 2003

Ec03-702 Precision Agriculture: Applications Of Remote Sensing In Site-Specific Management, Viacheslav I. Adamchuk, Richard L. Perk, James S. Schepers

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Precision farming is an emerging agricultural technology that involves managing each crop input on a site-specific basis to reduce waste, increase profits, and maintain the quality of the environment. Remote sensing is a technology that can be used to obtain various spatial layers of information about soil and crop conditions. It allows detection and/or characterization of an object, series of objects, or landscape without having the sensor in physical contact.


Ec03-181 Alfalfa In Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas E. Hunt, Shripat T. Kamble, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Charles A. Shapiro Jan 2003

Ec03-181 Alfalfa In Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas E. Hunt, Shripat T. Kamble, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Charles A. Shapiro

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Alfalfa is the most important forage crop grown in Nebraska, with over 1,000 acres grown in every county. It has the highest feeding value for livestock and one of the highest yield potentials. Alfalfa can produce more protein per acre than any other crop and can provide all of the protein needed by many livestock as well as supplying large amounts of vitamins, minerals, and energy. Protein of alfalfa. In also covers the cultural practices, insect pests, diseases, weeds that affect alfalfa.


Ec03-1884 Wheat Disease Profiles I, John E. Watkins, Robert M. Harveson, James P. Stack, Loren J. Giesler, Jennifer L. Chaky Jan 2003

Ec03-1884 Wheat Disease Profiles I, John E. Watkins, Robert M. Harveson, James P. Stack, Loren J. Giesler, Jennifer L. Chaky

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, 4-color extension circular covers the disease and symptoms of wheat in Nebraska. The diseases listed are: barley yellow dwarf, soil-borne wheat mosaic, wheat streak mosaic, leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust, tan spot, septoria leaf blotch, common root rot, crown rot, Fusarium head blight (scab).


Ec03-101 Nebraska Seed Guide, 2004, Lenis Alton Nelson, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall Jan 2003

Ec03-101 Nebraska Seed Guide, 2004, Lenis Alton Nelson, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of corn hybrid performance tests conducted by the Agronomy/Horticulture Department and the Northeast, South Central, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers of Nebraska and University of Wyoming at Torrington. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


G02-1460 Fertilizing Winter Wheat I: Nitrogen, Potassium, And Micronutrients, Jurg M. Blumenthal, Donald H. Sander Jan 2002

G02-1460 Fertilizing Winter Wheat I: Nitrogen, Potassium, And Micronutrients, Jurg M. Blumenthal, Donald H. Sander

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Soil testing, recommended rates, and timing for fertilizing winter wheat with nitrogen, potassium, and micronutrients.

Management practices which provide an adequate, but not excessive, supply of plant nutrients are essential for top yields of high quality winter wheat in the High Plains.


Ec02-173 Spotted And Diffuse Knapweed, Neil L. Heckman, Ryan M. Goss, Roch E. Gaussoin, Stevan Z. Knezevic, John L. Lindquist Jan 2002

Ec02-173 Spotted And Diffuse Knapweed, Neil L. Heckman, Ryan M. Goss, Roch E. Gaussoin, Stevan Z. Knezevic, John L. Lindquist

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Spotted knapweed (Centaure amaculosa Lam. = C. biebersteinii DC.) and diffuse knapweed (C.diffusa Lam.) are two of Nebraska’s seven noxious weeds. They are also noxious in at least 17 other states. These are closely related species that are well adapted to a variety of habitats including open forests, rangelands and pastures, Conservation Reserve Program lands, roadsides, and ditch banks. Centaurea is a large genus of over 400 species, 32 of which are common weeds of the United States and several of which [e.g., yellowstar thistle, C. solstitalis L, and Russian knapweed, C. repens L. =Acroptilon repens (L.) DC ...


Ec02-172 Plumeless Thistle, Kara L. Hilgenfeld, Alex Martin Jan 2002

Ec02-172 Plumeless Thistle, Kara L. Hilgenfeld, Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Plumeless thistle (Carduus acanthoides L.) is one of seven noxious weeds in Nebraska. An introduced invasive broadleaf weed native to Europe and Asia, plumeless thistle currently infests about 65,000 acres in Nebraska. Infestations of plumeless thistle may reduce productivity of pastures and rangeland, where infestations tend to be the largest. Plumeless thistle competes with and suppresses growth of desirable species. Heavy infestations prevent livestock from grazing the area and lighter infestations prevent livestock from eating plants growing near the thistle. Estimates place the annual loss in Nebraska agricultural production due to plumeless thistle at $162,000. Although plumeless thistle ...


Ec02-171 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson Jan 2002

Ec02-171 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Canada thistle [Cirsium arvense (L) Scop.] is one of the seven species defined by Nebraska law as a noxious weed. At least 35 other states also have determined by law that Canada thistle poses a threat to the economic, social, and aesthetic well-being of the residents of their state. Canada thistle is probably the most widespread of all the thistle species and many land managers consider it the most difficult thistle to control. In Nebraska, Canada thistle is estimated to infest 460,000 acres.


Ec02-177 Purple Loosestrife, Stevan Z. Knezevic Jan 2002

Ec02-177 Purple Loosestrife, Stevan Z. Knezevic

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is an introduced invasive weed that isover running thousands of acres of wetlands and waterways in the Midwest. Once purple loosestrife invades a wetland, natural habitat is lost and the productivity of native plant and animal communities is severely reduced. These losses in turn interfere with various levels of the ecosystem and area recreational activities such as fishing, boating and hunting, diminishing revenue from tourism and impairing the social and economic well being of local communities. A single control measure cannot provide long-term, sustainable control of this weed. An integrated approach, using a variety of mechanical ...


Ec02-176 Musk Thistle, Fred Roeth, Steven R. Melvin, Irvin L. Schleufer Jan 2002

Ec02-176 Musk Thistle, Fred Roeth, Steven R. Melvin, Irvin L. Schleufer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Musk thistle (Carduus nutans L.) is an introduced invasive broadleaf weed native to Europe, North Africa, and Asia. In these areas it is a minor weed because natural enemies keep its population low. When the plant was introduced into North America, its natural enemies were left behind. Without these natural checks, the thistle is able to thrive and compete with native vegetation.

Musk thistles aggressively invade all lands in Nebraska. Typical cropland weed control methods are very effective against them; however, land with permanent cover (pasture, range, roadway ditches and wasteland) that is not tilled or treated with a herbicide ...


Ec02-174 Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady F. Kappler Jan 2002

Ec02-174 Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady F. Kappler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Leafy spurge is an invasive weed that infests over three million acres in the northern Great Plains and the prairie provinces of Canada. It is commonly found in rangelands, pastures, roadsides, rights-of-way, and woodlands. Leafy spurge can reduce rangeland and pasture carrying capacity by as much as 75 percent because it competes with forages and cattle avoid grazing areas infested with this weed. In North Dakota where leafy spurge infests about 900,000 acres, estimates of direct and indirect losses exceed $100 million each year. In Nebraska, the direct loss in forage value attributed to leafy spurge has been estimated ...


Ec02-106 Nebraska Grain Sorghum Hybrid Tests, 2002, Lenis Alton Nelson, Roger Wesley Elmore, Robert N. Klein, David D. Baltensperger Jan 2002

Ec02-106 Nebraska Grain Sorghum Hybrid Tests, 2002, Lenis Alton Nelson, Roger Wesley Elmore, Robert N. Klein, David D. Baltensperger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of grain sorghum trials conducted to obtain yield land other information for some of the hybrids being marketed. The 2002 season was the 45th year that private hybrids were included in these trials. Seed producers supported test through fee payments. Cooperating were the Agronomy Department and the South Central, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


Ec02-105 Nebraska Corn Hybrid Tests, 2002, Lenis Alton Nelson, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall Jan 2002

Ec02-105 Nebraska Corn Hybrid Tests, 2002, Lenis Alton Nelson, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of corn hybrid performance tests conducted by the Agronomy Department and the Northeast, South Central, West Central and Panhandle Research Extension Centers of Nebraska and University of Wyoming at Torrington. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service. Tests were supported in part by fees paid by hybrid seed corn producers.


Ec02-174 Noxious Weeds Of Nebraska: Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady Kappler Jan 2002

Ec02-174 Noxious Weeds Of Nebraska: Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady Kappler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Leafy spurge is an invasive weed that infests over three million acres in the northern Great Plains and the prairie provinces of Canada. It is commonly found in rangelands, pastures, roadsides, rights-of-way, and woodlands. Leafy spurge can reduce rangeland and pasture carrying capacity by as much as 75 percent because it competes with forages and cattle avoid grazing areas infested with this weed.

This Extension Circular discusses the biology, identification, distribution and control of leafy spurge.


Ec01-872 Nebraska Crop Budgets 2001, Roger Selley, Tina N. Barrett, Richard T. Clark, Robert N. Klein, Steve Melvin Jan 2001

Ec01-872 Nebraska Crop Budgets 2001, Roger Selley, Tina N. Barrett, Richard T. Clark, Robert N. Klein, Steve Melvin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The 2001 Crop Budgets contains a list of representative field operations and materials that provides a reminder of items typically invovled in producing the crop. The budgets are presented in a worksheet format with a "Your Estimate" column for recording modifications in costs.

This publication covers the following crops: Forages -- alfalfa, annual hay, corn silage, grass, grass hay, and pasture. Grain -- corn, dry beans, grain sorghum, proso millet, oats, soybeans, sugar beets, sunflower, wheat.


Ec01-103 Nebraska Fall-Sown Small Grain Variety Tests 2001, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, Todd Campbell, James Krall Jan 2001

Ec01-103 Nebraska Fall-Sown Small Grain Variety Tests 2001, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, Todd Campbell, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of variety trials conducted by personnel of the Agronomy Department and the South Central, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers and their associated agricultural laboratories. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Sersvice.


Ec01-158 Integrating Management Objectives And Grazing Strategies On Semi-Arid Rangeland, Patrick E. Reece, Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht Jan 2001

Ec01-158 Integrating Management Objectives And Grazing Strategies On Semi-Arid Rangeland, Patrick E. Reece, Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Rangelands account for about half of Nebraska's total land area or about 24 million acres. Much of these expansive natural resource areas are in the semi-arid climatic region of Nebraska where grazing management decisions have a profound effect on ranch survival.

The educational object of this circular is to explain management practices that optimize the sustainability of rangeland-based enterprises. Additionally a decision-support tool is provided for selecting grazing systems best suited to livestock production and natural resource management objectives.


Ec00-106 Nebraska Grain Sorghum Hybrid Tests 2000, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger Jan 2000

Ec00-106 Nebraska Grain Sorghum Hybrid Tests 2000, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of grain sorghum trials conducted to obtain yield and other information for some of the hybrids being marketed. The 2000 season was the 43rd year that private hybrids were included in these trials.


G00-1395 Soybean Seeding Rates, Roger Wesley Elmore, James E. Specht Jan 2000

G00-1395 Soybean Seeding Rates, Roger Wesley Elmore, James E. Specht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The soybean stand looked horrible late that May. The field had a good seed bed at planting, but rain after planting crusted the soil over the seed furrows. Rain was in the short-term forecast. All other row crops were planted and looked fine, but this field concerned the producer. Should the producer replant? Recommended soybean seeding rates, stand assessment and replanting rates based on Nebraska field research are addressed in this NebGuide.


G99-1395 Soybean Seeding Rates, Roger Wesley Elmore, James E. Specht Jan 1999

G99-1395 Soybean Seeding Rates, Roger Wesley Elmore, James E. Specht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Recommended soybean seeding rates, stand assessment and replanting rates based on Nebraska field research are addressed in this NebGuide. The soybean stand looked horrible late that May. The field had a good seed bed at planting, but rain after planting crusted the soil over the seed furrows. Rain was in the short-term forecast. All other row crops were planted and looked fine, but this field concerned the producer.


Nf99-397 Gray Leaf Spot Of Perennial Ryegrass In Nebraska, John E. Watkins Jan 1999

Nf99-397 Gray Leaf Spot Of Perennial Ryegrass In Nebraska, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Gray leaf spot, caused by the fungus Pyricularia grisea, was reported in the early 1970s to be a damaging disease of annual ryegrass grown for forage in the southeastern United States. Forage yield losses were so severe that the disease was named ryegrass blast.

This NebFact discusses the diagnosis, future occurrences, and management of gray leaf spot in Nebraska and surrounding states.


Ec99-106 Nebraska Grain Sorghum Hybrid Tests, 1999, Lenis Alton Nelson, Roger Wesley Elmore, Robert N. Klein, David D. Baltensperger Jan 1999

Ec99-106 Nebraska Grain Sorghum Hybrid Tests, 1999, Lenis Alton Nelson, Roger Wesley Elmore, Robert N. Klein, David D. Baltensperger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of grain sorghum trials conducted to obtain yield and other information for some of the hybrids being marketed. The 1999 season was the 42th year that private hybrids were included in these trials. Cooperating were the Agronomy Department and the South Central, West Central, and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.