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Full-Text Articles in Education

G95-1239 Managing To Prevent Equine Developmental Orthopedic Diseases, Kathleen P. Anderson Jan 1995

G95-1239 Managing To Prevent Equine Developmental Orthopedic Diseases, Kathleen P. Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes and discusses management techniques to prevent orthopedic disease in horses.

Equine Developmental Orthopedic Disease (DOD) is a significant problem facing today's horse breeders. A serious case of DOD can render a young horse essentially worthless due to crippling lameness. There is continuous debate as to the interplay of nutrition, management, genetics and exercise on the incidence of bone disease in young, growing horses. In the early stages, growing horses may appear unaffected by the disease, but may later develop lameness and eventually chronic arthritis. Recent research has identified many factors which will aid breeders to minimize ...


G95-1262 Feeding The Beef Cow Herd--Part Ii Managing The Feeding Program, Richard J. Rasby, Ivan G. Rush, Don C. Adams Jan 1995

G95-1262 Feeding The Beef Cow Herd--Part Ii Managing The Feeding Program, Richard J. Rasby, Ivan G. Rush, Don C. Adams

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Feed costs are the cow/calf producer's greatest expense in producing a weaned calf. To remain competitive, cow/calf operators must use economical feeding programs. It is important to match the available feed resources with the nutrient requirements of the first-calf-heifer and cow. Both over- and underfeeding the cow herd can lead to high production costs.

Nutrient requirements for heifers calving as 2-year-olds and cows calving as 3-year-olds and older are shown in Table I. Beef cows are seldom fed complete rations where ingredients are weighed daily. Generally, most of a cow's ration is forages such as: 1 ...


Nf95-222 Nutrition Resources For Modified Or Prescribed Diets, Linda S. Boeckner Jan 1995

Nf95-222 Nutrition Resources For Modified Or Prescribed Diets, Linda S. Boeckner

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This list of books is only a beginning resource list if you have been recommended to follow a modified diet for therapeutic or preventive purposes.


Ec95-1873 Cultural Practices That Influence Wheat Diseases, John E. Watkins, Robert N. Klein, Paul C. Hay, Lenis Alton Nelson Jan 1995

Ec95-1873 Cultural Practices That Influence Wheat Diseases, John E. Watkins, Robert N. Klein, Paul C. Hay, Lenis Alton Nelson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The health of a wheatcrop is determined well before the crop is planted. It is often the result of subtle factors in the management history of the field, including varieties, seed quality, seedbed, planting date, residue management and post harvest weed control. Wheat health management practices before the crop is planted must limit, as much as possible, the number of production hazards that must be dealt with after planting. Important diseases influenced by cultural practices include crown and root rot, wheat streak mosaic, soil-borne wheat mosaic, barley yellow dwarf, leaf rust, smut diseases, scab, Cephalosporium stripe and tan spot.


G95-1261 Five Strategies For Extending Machinery Life, Robert D. Grisso, Steven R. Melvin Jan 1995

G95-1261 Five Strategies For Extending Machinery Life, Robert D. Grisso, Steven R. Melvin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Machinery ownership and operation is a major crop and livestock production cost. Several items combined can significantly affect costs, improve machine reliability and improve profit margins.

How to Get Maximum Machinery Life

This fact sheet discusses five strategies to achieve maximum farm machinery life. These strategies are: machinery maintenance, oil analysis, machinery storage, engine tune-ups, and avoiding modification of tractor engines.


G95-1273 Radial Tractor Tires -- Performance That Counts!, Robert Grisso Jan 1995

G95-1273 Radial Tractor Tires -- Performance That Counts!, Robert Grisso

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Radial tractor tires offer advantages over bias-ply tires that usually result in increased productivity and reduced fuel consumption.

The axle power developed by a tractor is distributed four ways: overcoming rolling resistance, wheel slip losses, tire-soil action and useful drawbar work. The most efficient use of tractor power occurs when the drawbar power is maximized and the first three items are minimized.

Radial tractor tires can improve tractive efficiency and extend tire wear. There are benefits and disadvantages of radial tractor tires compared to bias-ply tires. Radial tractor tires should be considered as original equipment on new tractors and as ...


Ec95-137 Producing And Marketing Proso Millet In The High Plains, D. D. Baltensperger, Drew J. Lyon, R. Anderson, Tom Holman, C. Stymieste, J. Shanahan, Lenis Alton Nelson, Karen L. Deboer, Gary L. Hein, J. Krall Jan 1995

Ec95-137 Producing And Marketing Proso Millet In The High Plains, D. D. Baltensperger, Drew J. Lyon, R. Anderson, Tom Holman, C. Stymieste, J. Shanahan, Lenis Alton Nelson, Karen L. Deboer, Gary L. Hein, J. Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Proso millet, Panicum miliaceum (L.), is a warm season grass capable of producing seed 60 to 90 days after planting. It has been called millet, hog millet, and yellow hog. It has been grown in many countries of the world including China, the former Soviet Union, Afghanistan, Romania, Turkey, and India.

Historically, proso production in the High Plains has been quite variable, depending on the survival of the winter wheat crop, government programs, and market price.

Proso can be used in several ways. Proso millet grain is used as bird and livestock feed in the United States and for livestock ...


G95-1241 Annual Broadleaf Weed Control In Winter Wheat (Revised January 1999), Gail` A. Wicks, Robert N. Klein, Alex Martin, Drew J. Lyon Jan 1995

G95-1241 Annual Broadleaf Weed Control In Winter Wheat (Revised January 1999), Gail` A. Wicks, Robert N. Klein, Alex Martin, Drew J. Lyon

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide discusses preventive, cultural, and chemical weed control in winter wheat. The best weed control is obtained by using a combination of these methods. Winter and summer annual broadleaf weeds have an important economic impact on Nebraska winter wheat. They compete with winter wheat for water, light, space, and nutrients, reducing Nebraska winter wheat yields by an estimated 10 percent each year. The dollar loss, with wheat at $2.50 per bushel, is over $2.1 million per year. Weeds also slow harvest and increase combine repair costs. Producers may be docked at the elevator for excessive grain moisture ...


G95-1135 Estimating Percent Residue Cover Using The Calculation Method, David P. Shelton, John A. Smith, Paul J. Jasa, Roger Kanable Jan 1995

G95-1135 Estimating Percent Residue Cover Using The Calculation Method, David P. Shelton, John A. Smith, Paul J. Jasa, Roger Kanable

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes how to use the calculation method to estimate the percent of the soil surface that will be covered with crop residue after using residue-disturbing implements and operations. Leaving crop residue on the soil surface is the easiest and most cost-effective method of reducing soil erosion. Research in Nebraska and other midwestern states found that leaving as little as 20 percent of the soil surface covered with crop residue can reduce soil erosion caused by rainfall and flowing water by one-half compared to residue-free conditions. Greater amounts of residue cover will further reduce erosion.


G95-1134 Estimating Percent Residue Cover Using The Photo-Comparison Method, David P. Shelton, Paul J. Jasa Jan 1995

G95-1134 Estimating Percent Residue Cover Using The Photo-Comparison Method, David P. Shelton, Paul J. Jasa

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide presents photographs and describes how to use the photo-comparison method to estimate the percentage of the soil surface covered with crop residue.

Leaving crop residue on the soil surface is the easiest and most cost-effective method of reducing soil erosion. Research in Nebraska and other midwestern states shows that leaving as little as 20 percent of the soil surface covered with crop residue can reduce soil erosion caused by rainfall and flowing water by one-half compared to residue-free conditions. Greater amounts of residue cover will further reduce erosion.


G95-1132 Estimating Percent Residue Cover, David P. Shelton, Paul J. Jasa, John A. Smith, Roger Kanable Jan 1995

G95-1132 Estimating Percent Residue Cover, David P. Shelton, Paul J. Jasa, John A. Smith, Roger Kanable

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide briefly describes the direct observation, line-transect, photo comparison, and calculation methods that are used to estimate the percentage of the soil surface covered with crop residue. Leaving crop residue on the soil surface is the easiest and most cost-effective way to reduce soil erosion caused by water and wind. Residue reduces water erosion by lessening the impact of the raindrops, thus reducing the amount of soil that is detached. It also slows flowing water, reducing the amount of soil that can be transported. Residue helps reduce wind erosion by reducing wind velocity near the soil surface and by ...


G95-1248 Healthful Snacks For Children Two To Five Years Of Age, H. Darlene Martin Jan 1995

G95-1248 Healthful Snacks For Children Two To Five Years Of Age, H. Darlene Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide discusses the benefits of providing snacks to young children and shares ideas for what good snacks are for these children.

Why do children two to five years of age need snacks?

Snacks are an important part of children's daily food intake. It is difficult for children to get all the nutrients they need to promote growth and development in three meals a day. Also, most children need snacks because they get hungry between meals. Well-chosen snacks can help supply nutrients and energy needs (calories).

As a parent you may say, "My children do not need any more ...


G95-1249 Dietary Guidelines For Children Age Two To Five, H. Darlene Martin Jan 1995

G95-1249 Dietary Guidelines For Children Age Two To Five, H. Darlene Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication discusses the dietary needs and guidelines for young children.

If you have children or care for children who are between two and five years of age, you play a significant role in their health. The quality of care you provide will benefit the children within your care now and in the future. To provide adequate food choices for children, you need to understand what foods help children grow and develop.

Most of us know that good health and proper nutrition are important. The first step in helping children learn good nutritional habits is to practice them daily yourself ...


Nf95-213 1995 Home Garden And Landscape Fungicide Survey, John E. Watkins, John C. Fech Jan 1995

Nf95-213 1995 Home Garden And Landscape Fungicide Survey, John E. Watkins, John C. Fech

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has information on the various fungicides available and what types of plants they are registered for.


Nf95-214 Turfgrass Fungicide Trade Names, John E. Watkins Jan 1995

Nf95-214 Turfgrass Fungicide Trade Names, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact offers information regarding specific trade names and turfgrass fungicides.


Nf95-246 Nebraska Turkey Facts, Sheila E. Scheideler, Rebecca Brown Jan 1995

Nf95-246 Nebraska Turkey Facts, Sheila E. Scheideler, Rebecca Brown

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact provides readers with Nebraska turkey industry facts.


G95-1259 Wildlife And Disease--Public Health Concerns, Dallas Virchow, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Wayne L. Kramer Jan 1995

G95-1259 Wildlife And Disease--Public Health Concerns, Dallas Virchow, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Wayne L. Kramer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes human health risks and symptoms associated with prominent diseases of Nebraska's wildlife. Listed are precautions for minimizing exposure and preventing infection.

Zoonoses (zoe-uh'-no-sez') are diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans. Wild animals and domestic animals share some disease-causing organisms and either group can transmit diseases to people. Transmission can occur directly through contact with tissues or body fluids of animals. Indirect transmission can occur through insects, ticks and mites that feed on infected animals.


G95-1247 Selecting Case Goods--Woods, Shirley Niemeyer Jan 1995

G95-1247 Selecting Case Goods--Woods, Shirley Niemeyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication offers points to consider when buying various types of cabinetry chests, desks, bedsteads, tables, chairs, etc.

Case goods is a term used to describe various types of cabinetry, chests, desks, bedsteads, tables and chairs.


G95-1268 Lettuce And Other Salad Greens, Susan D. Schoneweis Jan 1995

G95-1268 Lettuce And Other Salad Greens, Susan D. Schoneweis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses different salad greens, their uses and nutritional value.

Lettuce has been an important part of human diets since ancient times. It was customary for the Romans to precede their gargantuan banquets with refreshing lettuce salads in the belief that lettuce enhanced the appetite and relaxed the alimentary canal. It had other uses, too. Dried lettuce juice was used to aid sleep in Elizabethan times and through World War II lactucarium, a sedative made from wild lettuce extracts, was used in hospitals┬╣. Today, lettuce is used as the main ingredient in most salads and it is joined by ...


Nf95-226 Estimating Floor Space For Farm Equipment Storage, Robert D. Grisso, Gerald R. Bodman Jan 1995

Nf95-226 Estimating Floor Space For Farm Equipment Storage, Robert D. Grisso, Gerald R. Bodman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact provides a guide for planning storage for farm equipment.


G95-1264 Storing Fresh Fruits And Vegetables, Susan D. Schoneweis, Durward Smith Jan 1995

G95-1264 Storing Fresh Fruits And Vegetables, Susan D. Schoneweis, Durward Smith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The following NebGuide outlines proper storage methods and conditions for fresh fruits and vegetables.

Harvesting fruits and vegetables from your garden at the proper stage of maturity is only the first step to fresh table quality. Proper harvesting and post-harvest handling methods, as well as proper storage of fruits and vegetables not immediately eaten, will help maintain the flavor, texture and nutritive value of the produce.

Proper storage means controlling both the temperature and relative humidity of the storage area. All fruits and vegetables do not have the same requirements. This NebGuide will help you select the best storage conditions ...


Ec95-1560 Use Of Cultural Practices In Crop Insect Pest Management, Robert J. Wright Jan 1995

Ec95-1560 Use Of Cultural Practices In Crop Insect Pest Management, Robert J. Wright

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This Extension Circular reviews what is known about the effects of rotations, tillage practices, and planting and harvest dates on crop insect management, focusing on major crops in Nebraska.

Before the development of synthetic organic insecticides (pre-DDT era), rotations, tillage practices, planting and harvest dates, and other nonchemical cultural controls were commonly recommended for insect management. Research focused on crop rotation and other cultural practices for insect management. With the development of DDT and later insecticides however, research on nonchemical controls decreased markedly.

With the emergence of the concept of sustainable agriculture in the 1980s, there has been increased emphasis ...


G95-1263 When To Sample For Alfalfa Weevil, Steven J. Meyer, Robert K.D. Peterson Jan 1995

G95-1263 When To Sample For Alfalfa Weevil, Steven J. Meyer, Robert K.D. Peterson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Dates for initiating alfalfa weevil scouting are provided, based on 30 years of climatic data used to estimate appropriate degree day accumulations for northern and southern Nebraska. Sampling activities for alfalfa weevil need to be timed properly because it is inefficient to sample when the pest is not active or present. Conversely, delayed sampling is financially risky because economic damage can occur before a management practice is implemented. Integrated pest management programs often use degree day accumulations to initiate activities, while producers often use calendar dates. Calendar scheduling is traditionally based on subjective experience rather than research.


Nf95-243 Soil Compaction Tips, Alice J. Jones Jan 1995

Nf95-243 Soil Compaction Tips, Alice J. Jones

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact offers 50 tips to prevent soil compaction.


Nf95-224 Pricing Sew Piglets, Michael Brumm, Larry L. Bitney Jan 1995

Nf95-224 Pricing Sew Piglets, Michael Brumm, Larry L. Bitney

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact addresses valuing and marketing SEW pigs in Nebraska.


Nf95-221 Feeder Pig Price Patterns At Omaha, Al Wellman Jan 1995

Nf95-221 Feeder Pig Price Patterns At Omaha, Al Wellman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact provides data about seasonal feeder pig price patterns.


Nf95-220 Cull Sow Price Patterns At Omaha, Al Wellman Jan 1995

Nf95-220 Cull Sow Price Patterns At Omaha, Al Wellman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact examines the market values of cull cow slaughter over a twenty-year time span.


Nf95-210 Slaughter Hog Price Patterns At Omaha, Al Wellman Jan 1995

Nf95-210 Slaughter Hog Price Patterns At Omaha, Al Wellman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact provides data about seasonal price patterns in slaughter hogs.


G95-1260 Fate Of Insecticides Used For Termite Control In Soil, Shripat T. Kamble Jan 1995

G95-1260 Fate Of Insecticides Used For Termite Control In Soil, Shripat T. Kamble

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides information on effects of soil and chemical properties affecting behavior of termiticides in soil.

Termites cause substantial damage to residential and commercial buildings in the United States. It has been estimated that the annual cost for controlling termites and repairing their damage in the United States exceeds $1.7 billion. Subterranean termites, the most destructive of all termites, account for 95 percent of this damage.


G95-1251 Biological Control Of Insect And Mite Pests, Robert J. Wright Jan 1995

G95-1251 Biological Control Of Insect And Mite Pests, Robert J. Wright

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The advantages and disadvantages of the three forms of biological control of insect and mite pests -- classical, augmentation and conservation -- are discussed.

Biological control is the conscious use of living beneficial organisms, called natural enemies, to control pests. Biological control should be an important part of any integrated pest management program, an approach which combines a variety of pest control methods to reduce pest levels below an economic threshold. Virtually all insect and mite pests have some natural enemies. Managing these natural enemies can effectively control many pests. Often the use of insecticides or other practices can injure or kill ...