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Full-Text Articles in Education

G94-1204 Face Fly Control Guide, John B. Campbell Jan 1994

G94-1204 Face Fly Control Guide, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The face fly congregates about the eyes and nose of animals, causing annoyance and possible disease transmission. This NebGuide discusses face fly breeding and effective controls.

The face fly closely resembles the house fly except it is slightly larger and darker. Other differentiating characteristics include: 1) the abdomen of the male face fly is orange and the female has an orange stripe; the abdomen of the house fly is white or light grey and 2) the compound eyes of male face flies nearly touch but are separated in the house flies.

The persistence and habit of congregating about the eyes ...


Nf94-164 Salmonella, Susan S. Sumner, Julie A. Albrecht Jan 1994

Nf94-164 Salmonella, Susan S. Sumner, Julie A. Albrecht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses Salmonella bacteria.


Nf94-203 Reimbursable Food Components In Nebraska's Child And Adult Care Food Program Meal Pattern, Darlene Martin Jan 1994

Nf94-203 Reimbursable Food Components In Nebraska's Child And Adult Care Food Program Meal Pattern, Darlene Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses food components in Nebraska's Child and Adult Care Food Program.


Nf94-139 Preservation Of Metal Items, Shirley Niemeyer Jan 1994

Nf94-139 Preservation Of Metal Items, Shirley Niemeyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses the preservation of metals.


Nf94-204 Computing The Dollar Value Of Concentrates And Byproduct Feeds For Dairy Cattle, Rick Grant Jan 1994

Nf94-204 Computing The Dollar Value Of Concentrates And Byproduct Feeds For Dairy Cattle, Rick Grant

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Feed costs represent 50 to 60 percent of variable milk production costs. Consequently, feed costs play a major role in determining the profitability of a dairy enterprise. Specifically, a producer should focus on "income above feed costs" to assess total feeding system profitability.


G94-1234 Should You Consider Expanding Your Dairy Herd?, Jeffrey F. Keown Jan 1994

G94-1234 Should You Consider Expanding Your Dairy Herd?, Jeffrey F. Keown

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses both the benefits and possible drawbacks from expanding an existing dairy operation.

Nebraska's dairy industry is going through a transition. Producers are beginning to ask the question, "Should I expand, and if so, how large should my herd become?" Before considering this issue, the producer should first ask, "Do I really want to expand?" Expansion can be, and in many cases is, a traumatic experience, not only to the producer, but also to the producer's family. Every segment of the dairy enterprise should be consulted before making a decision. Call a family gathering and discuss ...


Nf94-173 Making Time For Your Time Demands, Kathy Prochaska-Cue Jan 1994

Nf94-173 Making Time For Your Time Demands, Kathy Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact offers suggestions to increase time management skills.


Nf94-172 Thirteen Timely Tips For More Effective Personal Time Management, Kathy Prochaska-Cue Jan 1994

Nf94-172 Thirteen Timely Tips For More Effective Personal Time Management, Kathy Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses effective personal time management.


Ec94-737 Calibrating Anhydrous Ammonia Applicators, William L. Kranz, Charles A. Shapiro, Robert Grisso Jan 1994

Ec94-737 Calibrating Anhydrous Ammonia Applicators, William L. Kranz, Charles A. Shapiro, Robert Grisso

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Application of agricultural chemicals has come under increased scrutiny from environmental groups and federal regulatory agencies. Nitrogen fertilizer is used in greater quantities than any other agricultural chemical. It also is the contaminant most often found in Nebraska groundwater. Accurate application of nitrogen is important from an environmental and economic viewpoint. Approximately 800 million pounds of nitrogen are applied to 12 million acres of Nebraska cropland each year. Nitrogen applied as anhydrous ammonia (NH3) accounts for around 40 percent of the total nitrogen applied.


Ec94-132 Freeze Injury To Nebraska Wheat, Robert N. Klein, Drew J. Lyon, John E. Watkins Jan 1994

Ec94-132 Freeze Injury To Nebraska Wheat, Robert N. Klein, Drew J. Lyon, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraska’s adverse weather conditions affect winter wheat during much of its growth. The newer varieties of wheat have increased winter hardiness, and better management practices have reduced winter injury of winter wheat, yet low temperature injury during winter and spring can be destructive. Wheat has little resistance to low temperatures after it begins growing in the spring; therefore, injury from freezes at this time can occur in any part of the state. This publication describes temperature conditions that cause winter injury, symptoms of injury at different spring growth stages, and management practices to use when wheat is injured.


G94-1232 Food Safety Self-Inspection For Child Care Facilities, Julie A. Albrecht Jan 1994

G94-1232 Food Safety Self-Inspection For Child Care Facilities, Julie A. Albrecht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides a checklist for a self-inspection to aid child care facilities in providing safe food for their clients.

Conduct a self-inspection of your food preparation skills by answering the following questions. Concentrate on one section at a time. Choose a time when food preparation is in progress. Check either "yes" or "no." Questions receiving a "no" answer indicate an area that you need to change.


G95-1233 Food Safety For Child Care Facilities, Julie A. Albrecht Jan 1994

G95-1233 Food Safety For Child Care Facilities, Julie A. Albrecht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide outlines proper techniques for providing safe food in child care facilities.

Children are at high risk for food-borne illnesses. Young children are particularly vulnerable to microbial food-borne diseases because of their under-developed immune systems.

In recent years, reports of food-borne illnesses have made headlines. Most of these outbreaks involved food prepared away from home. Many cases of food-borne illness go unreported because the symptoms are similar to the flu.

Foods contaminated with microorganisms are the cause of food-borne illnesses. Contaminated food does not, however, always taste bad, smell bad, or look bad. Therefore, it is almost impossible to ...


Ec94-448 Let's Preserve: Jams, Jellies & Preserves, Julie A. Albrecht Jan 1994

Ec94-448 Let's Preserve: Jams, Jellies & Preserves, Julie A. Albrecht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Jams, jellies and preserves are foods with many textures, flavors, and colors. They all consist of fruits preserved mostly by means of sugar and they are thickened or jellied to some extent.

Fruit jelly is a semi-solid mixture of fruit juice and sugar that is clear and firm enough to hold its shape.

Jam also will hold its shape, but it is less firm than jelly. Jam is made from crushed or chopped fruits and sugar. Jams made from a mixture of fruits are usually called conserves, especially when they include citrus fruits, nuts, raisins, or coconut.

Preserves are made ...


Nf94-127 Growing Seedless (Triploid) Watermelons, Laurie Hodges Jan 1994

Nf94-127 Growing Seedless (Triploid) Watermelons, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has information on growing seedless watermelons.


Nf94-184 A Guide To Plant Societies, Susan Schoneweis Jan 1994

Nf94-184 A Guide To Plant Societies, Susan Schoneweis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact includes information about plant societies and organizations which can provide a vast amount of information for gardeners.


Ec94-1766 Windbreaks For Livestock Operations, James R. Brandle, Vernon Quam, Ladon Johnson, Bruce Wight Jan 1994

Ec94-1766 Windbreaks For Livestock Operations, James R. Brandle, Vernon Quam, Ladon Johnson, Bruce Wight

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Windbreaks play an important role in the protection of livestock, particularly in young animals and in areas with cold northerly winds during the winter and early spring. Properly placed windbreaks can provide benefits to feedlots, livestock pastures, and calving areas. Reducing wind speed in winter lowers animal stress, improves animal health, and increases feeding efficiency. Livestock windbreaks provide significant amounts of wildlife habitat, protect the working environment in and around the livestock area, and screen noise and odors associated with livestock operations.

Specific needs of animals dictate that special attention be given to access, snow storage, and drainage when planning ...


Ec94-1772 Windbreaks In Sustainable Agricultural Systems, James R. Brandle, Teresa Boes, Vernon Quam, John Gardner Jan 1994

Ec94-1772 Windbreaks In Sustainable Agricultural Systems, James R. Brandle, Teresa Boes, Vernon Quam, John Gardner

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sustainable agriculture is a system of whole-farm resource use balanced with whole-farm productivity. The overall level of productivity achieved is dependent upon the ability to coordinate and manage simultaneously the soil, water, plant, and animal resources within climatic and economic limits. Both the kind and amount of plants and animals supported by the system are important and play significant roles, both individually and collectively in maintaining a healthy farm environment. In the future, integrated systems will help reduce human impact on resources while providing sufficient supplies of high quality food and fiber.

Windbreaks provide protection for people, animals, buildings, crops ...


G94-1195 Care Of Newly Planted Trees, David P. Mooter, Mark O. Harrell, Laurie J. Stepanek Jan 1994

G94-1195 Care Of Newly Planted Trees, David P. Mooter, Mark O. Harrell, Laurie J. Stepanek

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Mulching, pruning, watering, wrapping, staking, and fertilizing affect the growth and development of young trees. This NebGuide explains the proper practices of caring for newly planted trees.

Landscape trees provide beauty and utility. The care they receive during the first few years after planting is critical. This NebGuide discusses cultural practices that are recommended for young trees. Many recommendations have changed drastically in recent years in light of new and more thorough research.


Nf94-179 Surge Irrigation Management, Kelly Wertz, Joel E. Cahoon, C. Dean Yonts Jan 1994

Nf94-179 Surge Irrigation Management, Kelly Wertz, Joel E. Cahoon, C. Dean Yonts

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses surge irrigation management.


Nf94-177 Nebraska Surge Irrigation Trials, C. Dean Yonts, Joel E. Cahoon, Dean E. Eisenhauer, Kelly Wertz Jan 1994

Nf94-177 Nebraska Surge Irrigation Trials, C. Dean Yonts, Joel E. Cahoon, Dean E. Eisenhauer, Kelly Wertz

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses the Nebraska Surge Irrigation Trials.


G94-1222 Rug And Carpet Fibers: Selection And Care, Shirley Niemeyer Jan 1994

G94-1222 Rug And Carpet Fibers: Selection And Care, Shirley Niemeyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication discusses structural characteristics to consider when selecting carpet, including fiber and yarn construction.

The Fibers

Both natural and manufactured fibers are used in carpeting. Naturals include wool and silk. Cotton tends to crush and soil easily so it is not used for carpeting. Manufactured fibers used in carpeting include nylon, polypropylene/olefin, and polyester.

As with all commodities, carpet fiber use changes. Times, availability and cost have an impact on the market. Ninety-nine percent of today's carpet fibers are manufactured. About 68 percent of the carpet market is nylon, 22 percent polypropylene/olefin, over 9 percent polyester ...


G94-1227 Preparation For Retirement: Planning When Still Employed, George P. Rowe Jan 1994

G94-1227 Preparation For Retirement: Planning When Still Employed, George P. Rowe

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Retirement preparation includes planning for financial security, health maintenance, a social network, and meaningful activities.

Retirement is defined as partial or complete withdrawal from career work accompanied by a change in the sources and amount of income. Most persons choose to retire today between the ages of 62 and 66 since eligibility for partial Social Security benefits begins at age 62 with full benefits available by age 65. Full benefits will begin later for Americans born after 1959 when they reach age 67 in 2027. For most occupations, there is no mandatory age at which people have to quit working ...


G94-1196 Vegetables And Herbs As Ornamentals (Revised November 1996), Susan D. Schoneweis Jan 1994

G94-1196 Vegetables And Herbs As Ornamentals (Revised November 1996), Susan D. Schoneweis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the use of vegetables as ornamental plants.

Many vegetables have ornamental, as well as food value. In fact, when tomatoes were first introduced to Europe, they were believed to be poisonous and were used only as ornamentals. Using vegetables as ornamentals is not just for those without space for a traditional vegetable garden. Incorporating vegetables into the landscape and using them as decorative container plants for porches and patios can make vegetable gardening more fun.


Nf94-185 Supporting And Pruning Raspberries, Donald Janssen, Donald H. Steinegger Jan 1994

Nf94-185 Supporting And Pruning Raspberries, Donald Janssen, Donald H. Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has information on supporting and pruning raspberries.


G94-1209 Evaluating The Landscape Of A Prospective Home, Don Steinegger, Roch E. Gaussoin Jan 1994

G94-1209 Evaluating The Landscape Of A Prospective Home, Don Steinegger, Roch E. Gaussoin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses facts to consider when examining a prospective home's yard and landscape.

Often home buyers hire an inspector to evaluate the roof, plumbing, heating system, and structure of a prospective home. Seldom, however, does the landscape receive similar scrutiny.

Buyers should consider investing time and, perhaps, even money in careful evaluation of the landscape they might be purchasing. A healthy, well-designed, well-maintained landscape adds significant equity (15 percent or more) to a property's value. In a climate like Nebraska's, characterized by hot, windy summers and cold, windy winters, lawns, trees, and shrubs play a major ...


Nf94-178 Nebraska Surge Irrigation Trials, C. Dean Yonts, Joel E. Cahoon, Dean E. Eisenhauer, Kelly Wertz Jan 1994

Nf94-178 Nebraska Surge Irrigation Trials, C. Dean Yonts, Joel E. Cahoon, Dean E. Eisenhauer, Kelly Wertz

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses the Nebraska Surge Irrigation Trials.


Nf94-176 Surge Irrigation, C. Dean Yonts, Joel E. Cahoon, Dean E. Eisenhauer, Kelly Wertz Jan 1994

Nf94-176 Surge Irrigation, C. Dean Yonts, Joel E. Cahoon, Dean E. Eisenhauer, Kelly Wertz

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses surge irrigation.


G94-1208 Managing The Alfalfa Weevil, Stephen D. Danielson, Thomas E. Hunt, Keith J. Jarvi Jan 1994

G94-1208 Managing The Alfalfa Weevil, Stephen D. Danielson, Thomas E. Hunt, Keith J. Jarvi

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The identification and life cycle of the alfalfa weevil are discussed along with scouting techniques, economic thresholds, and other integrated pest management tactics.

The alfalfa weevil is the primary insect pest of alfalfa in Nebraska. Management is essential to reduce crop losses, particularly during years when weevil infestation is high. Because there also are years when weevil damage is economically unimportant, it is necessary for growers to become familiar with sampling procedures, management guidelines, and control recommendations so control techniques are not used unnecessarily.


G94-1210 Borers Of Shade Trees And Ornamental Plants, Frederick P. Baxendale, David L. Keith, J. Ackland Jones Jan 1994

G94-1210 Borers Of Shade Trees And Ornamental Plants, Frederick P. Baxendale, David L. Keith, J. Ackland Jones

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication describes the important shade tree and ornamental borers in Nebraska and discusses their management.

Nearly all shade trees are subject to borer attack. If damage is severe, young trees are likely to decline or die.


G94-1220 Controlling Ticks, John B. Campbell, Gustave D. Thomas Jan 1994

G94-1220 Controlling Ticks, John B. Campbell, Gustave D. Thomas

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Identification and control of ticks common to Nebraska.

Ticks are members of the same phylum (Arthropoda) of the animal kingdom as insects, but are in a different class (Arachnida). The main difference is the body of a tick is composed of only two sections while insect bodies have three sections.

There are over 800 species of ticks, 100 of which are important to man and animals because of economic losses or disease transmission. Fortunately in the United States, only about 12 species are economically important because they transmit disease organisms (viral, bacterial, protozoan, and rickettsial) or cause economic losses to ...