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Full-Text Articles in Education

G77-353 Garden Chrysanthemums, Dale T. Lindgren Jan 1977

G77-353 Garden Chrysanthemums, Dale T. Lindgren

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Site selection, soil preparation, planting and care of chrysanthemums are covered here.

Chrysanthemums (mums) are one of the most popular plants for late summer and fall flower gardens in Nebraska. Flower colors include white, yellow, orange, bronze, red, purple and pink. Mums can be classified by several methods, according to flower form and size and plant growth characteristics.


G77-334 Timber Sale Contracts, Rick Hamilton Jan 1977

G77-334 Timber Sale Contracts, Rick Hamilton

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A good contract protects both seller and buyer from legal problems arising from the harvest and sale of standing timber.

A timber sale contract is a legally binding written document governing the terms of a timber sale. A good contract protects both seller and buyer from legal problems arising from the harvest and sale of standing timber.

Timber has historically been sold under gentlemen's agreements. These verbal agreements have caused seller and buyer dissatisfaction and loss of trust. A contract clarifies the obligations of both parties prior to timber harvest.


G77-364 Mycoplasmal Pneumonia And Other Mycoplasmal Diseases Of Swine, Alex Hogg, William P. Switzer, Daniel O. Farrington Jan 1977

G77-364 Mycoplasmal Pneumonia And Other Mycoplasmal Diseases Of Swine, Alex Hogg, William P. Switzer, Daniel O. Farrington

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Swine producers are often confused by the complexity of the mycoplasmal infections; this fact sheet is an attempt to clarify the information that is currently available about these swine diseases.

Swine producers are often confused by the complexity of the mycoplasmal infections. This fact sheet is an attempt to clarify the information that is currently available about these swine diseases. There are three recognized Mycoplasma spp. of bacteria that cause disease in pigs--Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae.


G77-326 Clostridial Diseases Of Cattle (Revised September 1981), W.B. Wren, Duane N. Rice Jan 1977

G77-326 Clostridial Diseases Of Cattle (Revised September 1981), W.B. Wren, Duane N. Rice

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The Clostridial diseases are a group of frequently fatal infections caused by bacteria belonging to the group called Clostridia. These organisms have the ability to form protective shell-like forms called spores when exposed to adverse conditions. This allows them to remain potentially infective in soils for long periods of time, presenting a significant danger to the livestock population. Many of the organisms in this group are also normally present in the intestines of man and animals.

This NebGuide discusses the different clostridial diseases found in cattle.


G77-361 Using Starter Fertilizers For Corn, Grain Sorghum, And Soybeans, Edwin J. Penas, Gary W. Hergert Jan 1977

G77-361 Using Starter Fertilizers For Corn, Grain Sorghum, And Soybeans, Edwin J. Penas, Gary W. Hergert

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Starter fertilizer may increase early growth of corn and grain sorghum. Grain yield increases from starter nutrients are most likely on low phosphorus soils and some sandy soils.

Proper use of a starter fertilizer is an important management tool for crop producers striving for top yields. While the use of a starter fertilizer can be important for crop production on many soils, it is more important for corn production on irrigated sandy soils than on fine textured soils.


G77-380 Growing Conifers From Seed, Constance A. Harrington Jan 1977

G77-380 Growing Conifers From Seed, Constance A. Harrington

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses how to grow conifers from seed, including technical terms, collecting and storing seed, and planting and care of the trees.

Growing your own conifer trees from seed is fun and gives you the satisfaction of doing it yourself. The pioneers had to be self-reliant. Many of the old trees in Nebraska were started from seeds the pioneers brought with them or ordered from nurseries in the east or Europe. We are fortunate in having nurseries available to supply a wide variety of planting stock. However, many people are still interested in growing their own seedlings. You may ...


G77-383 Marketing Your Timber, Mark Shasby, Neal E. Jennings Jan 1977

G77-383 Marketing Your Timber, Mark Shasby, Neal E. Jennings

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Marketing is the key to getting the most from your timber.

Buying and selling trees is a business transaction. Marketing is the key to getting the most for your timber. Anyone can sell something if they are not concerned about the price received. When you market something, you are selling in a competitive market for the best possible price.

A satisfactory sale occurs when the needs of both buyer and seller are met. The buyer must acquire material at current market prices in order to stay in business and still remain competitive. The timber owner should be paid the fair ...


Heg77-78 It's About Time, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue Jan 1977

Heg77-78 It's About Time, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide looks at a simple time management system.

An unusual resource each of us has is time. It's unusual because you can't save it for tomorrow, you can't borrow today some you had left over yesterday, you can't lend it to someone else, you can't leave it behind, you can't take it with you.

You can do only two things with time; use it now or lose it forever.


G77-344 Annual Flowers For Specific Uses In Nebraska, Dale T. Lindgren Jan 1977

G77-344 Annual Flowers For Specific Uses In Nebraska, Dale T. Lindgren

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Wondering what annual flowers to plant where? This NebGuide can help.

Annual flowers grow from seed, come into flower and die in a single growing season. The following lists of annual flowers are grouped for specific uses in Nebraska. Common names are listed first, followed by scientific names.


G77-337 Propagating House Plants, Dale T. Lindgren, Don Steinegger Jan 1977

G77-337 Propagating House Plants, Dale T. Lindgren, Don Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Propagating house plants in the home is an inexpensive and enjoyable hobby. The home is not always the ideal place, but most house plants can be propagated there satisfactorily with a minimum of special equipment.

Methods of Propagation

House plants may be propagated asexually, in which all new plants will be identical, in most cases, to the parent plant, or sexually, where the new plants will not necessarily be identical to the parent plants. Plants are propagated sexually by seeds. Cuttings, air-layering, division and runners are asexual methods of propagation.


Heg77-73 Wall Finishes, Magdalene Pfister Jan 1977

Heg77-73 Wall Finishes, Magdalene Pfister

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses interior wall treatments: paint, wallpaper and fabric.

Paint is an easy, quick and inexpensive way to get the color you want. If you have a particular color in mind, you are most likely to find it in paint or have it mixed for the desired shade.

Wallpaper and other flexible coverings offer a wide variety of color, patterns and textures, It is possible to find a paper to go with any style of furnishings, formal or informal, in a wide price range. Some patterns are coordinated with fabric.

There are fabrics made especially for wall coverings which ...


G77-355 A Guide For The Control Of Flies In Nebraska Feedlots And Dairies (Revised March 1990), John B. Campbell Jan 1977

G77-355 A Guide For The Control Of Flies In Nebraska Feedlots And Dairies (Revised March 1990), John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Flies, especially stable and house flies, can create serious and costly problems for feedlot and dairy operations. This publication describes several methods for control.

Several species of flies may be in confined livestock facilities during summer. The stable and house fly are the most serious pests. Blow flies also may be present if molasses is in the diet. Horn flies--small blood-feeding flies--may be present in early spring. These flies overwinter as pupae in or near manure pats in range or pasture. If cattle are not present in the grassland when horn flies emerge, they will migrate to confinement cattle. Normally ...


G77-342 Sowbugs And Pillbugs, Arthur F. Hagen Jan 1977

G77-342 Sowbugs And Pillbugs, Arthur F. Hagen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication covers the identification, life history, and control of sowbugs and pillbugs.

Homeowners working around shrubs, in the garden, or along the foundation of the house, frequently find little grayish colored bugs. They often describe them as looking like "little armadillos." What they are finding are sowbugs or pillbugs or both. These creatures are not insects, but belong to the same class of animals as crabs and shrimp.


G77-358 Artesian (Confinsed) Aquifers And Effect Of Pumping, Darryll T. Pederson, Deon D. Axthelm Jan 1977

G77-358 Artesian (Confinsed) Aquifers And Effect Of Pumping, Darryll T. Pederson, Deon D. Axthelm

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraskans are concerned about declining water levels in some domestic and stock wells.

Nebraskans are concerned about declining water levels in some domestic and stock wells. Drought and irrigation well development have been major factors. Water level declines have been especially pronounced during the pumping season in places where the aquifer is artesian or confined (a confined aquifer is also referred to as an artesian aquifer). Many domestic and livestock pumps may have to be set deeper in order to yield water. In nearly all cases water levels recover rapidly when the pumping season ends. Large water-level fluctuations are normal ...


G77-386 Wheat In Poultry Rations, T.W. Sullivan, E.W. Gleaves Jan 1977

G77-386 Wheat In Poultry Rations, T.W. Sullivan, E.W. Gleaves

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication examines the advantages and disadvantages of wheat as a component of poultry feed.

Wheat is usually considered a source of human food rather than an ingredient for poultry and livestock feeds. This is especially true in the United States, where corn, milo and other feed grains are abundantly produced. In recent years one of every two bushels of wheat produced in the United States has been exported. If world production and supplies of wheat are high, a surplus develops and wheat prices are lowered. When this situation occurs wheat becomes an attractive alternative to corn or milo in ...


G77-357 Selecting Alfalfa Varieties For Nebraska (Revised December 1997), Bruce Anderson, Michael Trammell, Patrick E. Reece Jan 1977

G77-357 Selecting Alfalfa Varieties For Nebraska (Revised December 1997), Bruce Anderson, Michael Trammell, Patrick E. Reece

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Yield potential, pest resistance and seed price all should be considered in selecting alfalfa varieties in Nebraska. This NebGuide discusses them.

The most important variety decision made on many farms and ranches is the selection of alfalfa. The choice of alfalfa variety affects production for three to 10 or more years, whereas varieties of annual crops can be changed every year.

Many alfalfa varieties are available from private and public plant breeders. Over the years, yield trials conducted at widely distributed Nebraska locations have tested most varieties sold in the state.


G77-338 Open Burning (Revised March 1984), Donald E. Westover Jan 1977

G77-338 Open Burning (Revised March 1984), Donald E. Westover

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

People have been using fire in their cleanup chores for hundreds of years. One of the most common reasons for burning on the farm and in the city alike, has been to dispose of leaves and garden residues in the spring and fall of the year. Another common practice has been to burn tree limbs and stumps, fence posts, even old haystacks on the farm. Open burning has been done on a variety of scales, from jobs as small as burning the day's trash in the backyard burning barrel to jobs as large as burning wheat stubble after harvest.


G77-330 Estimating Pork Carcass Lean (Revised June 1994), Dennis E. Burson Jan 1977

G77-330 Estimating Pork Carcass Lean (Revised June 1994), Dennis E. Burson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Four procedures for pork carcass evaluation are given here, along with illustrations.

Pork carcass value is an important factor affecting the profitability of the pork industry. Reproduction traits and growth performance are easily recognized as keys to the profitability and health of the pork industry, yet carcass value also plays an important role. Differences in carcass product value are monetarily recognized by recognizing differences in carcass weight and grade. In addition, the pork industry recognizes that consumption of pork may key on public health concerns relating to reducing fat consumption and the resulting consumer demand for lower fat products.


Heg77-76 Pressing Methods (Revised April 1981), Thelma Thompson Jan 1977

Heg77-76 Pressing Methods (Revised April 1981), Thelma Thompson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses pressing methods that will not mar or distort the fabric.

A skillful job of pressing requires time, practice and the use of methods that will not mar the fabric. Pressing should not make the fabric shine, flatten the pile or nap, or distort the texture or weave.

Pressing is not ironing. In ironing, the iron is pushed from one spot to another in an unbroken motion to remove wrinkles. In pressing, the iron is lifted up and set down in a particular spot to flatten or shape small areas. To prevent the fabric from stretching, do not ...


G77-328 Irrigation Water Quality Criteria, Gary W. Hergert, Delno Knudsen Jan 1977

G77-328 Irrigation Water Quality Criteria, Gary W. Hergert, Delno Knudsen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide is intended to provide guidelines to help understand and interpret chemical water quality test results.

All well and stream waters contain dissolved minerals. The amounts and kinds of minerals vary from one location to another and may vary with time. When irrigation water is applied, the mineral salts are left in the soil after the crop has used the water. Most of these mineral salts are beneficial to crop growth and soil condition, but in some cases they may be harmful. Irrigation water quality problems may be caused by (1) total mineral salts accumulating so that crops no ...


G77-384 Common Milkweed (Revised July 1984), Alex Martin, O.C. Burnside Jan 1977

G77-384 Common Milkweed (Revised July 1984), Alex Martin, O.C. Burnside

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses milkweed and how to control it in farmland.

Common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L.) is a perennial, broadleaf weed native to North America. It is most common in eastern and central Nebraska, but is occasionally found farther west in moist sites.


G77-382 Right Crop Stage For Herbicide Use Corn, Sorghum, Small Grains (Revised May 1992), Drew J. Lyon, Robert G. Wilson Jr., Alex Martin Jan 1977

G77-382 Right Crop Stage For Herbicide Use Corn, Sorghum, Small Grains (Revised May 1992), Drew J. Lyon, Robert G. Wilson Jr., Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Herbicides recommended for postemergence application in corn, sorghum, and small grains are discussed in this NebGuide. Proper timing of postemergence herbicides is essential to achieve maximum weed control and minimum crop injury. As field crops grow and mature, their tolerance to herbicides changes. As a general rule, annual and biennial weeds are more susceptible to postemergence herbicides when they are in the seedling stage. As they mature they become increasingly difficult to control, facing the grower with the problem of when to apply the herbicide to achieve the least crop injury and the most satisfactory weed control. Field crops differ ...


G77-336 Coccidiosis Of Cattle, Donald L. Ferguson Jan 1977

G77-336 Coccidiosis Of Cattle, Donald L. Ferguson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide contains information on the identification, treatment, and prevention of coccidiosis in cattle.

Coccidiosis continues to be one of the major disease problems for cattle producers. It is caused by microscopic, one-celled parasites, chiefly of the genus Eimeria. Twenty-one species of Eimeria have been reported in cattle. Only two, Eimeria bovis and Eimeria zuernii, are regularly associated with clinical infections in the field.


G77-372 Water Requirements For Beef Cattle, Paul Q. Guyer Jan 1977

G77-372 Water Requirements For Beef Cattle, Paul Q. Guyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Water requirements of cattle are influenced by a number of physiological and environmental conditions. These include such things as the rate and composition of gain, pregnancy, lactation, physical activity, type of ration, salt and dry matter intake, and environmental temperature.

The minimum requirement of cattle for water is a reflection of that needed for body growth, for fetal growth or lactation, and of that lost by excretion in the urine, feces, or sweat or by evaporation from the lungs or skin. Anything influencing these needs or losses will influence the minimum requirement.


Heg77-84 How A Bill Becomes Laws In Nebraska, Janet Wilson Jan 1977

Heg77-84 How A Bill Becomes Laws In Nebraska, Janet Wilson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide looks at the steps necessary for a bill to become a law in Nebraska.

The legislative process sometimes seems to be clothed in an aura of mystery. An understanding of the organization of the governing body and the steps involved in the introduction and passage of a bill should help remove some of the mystery.

A bill is an idea for a new law, or an idea to abolish or change an existing law.

Several hundred bills, ideas about many things, enter the legislative process in Nebraska each time the legislature meets.


G77-331 Sampling Feeds For Analyses, Bruce Anderson, Terry L. Mader, Rick Grant Jan 1977

G77-331 Sampling Feeds For Analyses, Bruce Anderson, Terry L. Mader, Rick Grant

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sampling is the key to accurate feed analyses and properly balancing livestock rations. Here's how to do it.

Accurate feed analyses are needed to balance livestock rations, correctly price hay, formulate least cost supplements, and efficiently allocate homegrown feeds to the proper class of livestock. Sampling is the most important factor affecting accuracy of feed analyses.

The feed value of most forages varies. Therefore, test forages routinely to determine their best and most economical use. With adequate forage testing, you can develop an accurate forage inventory which allows you to efficiently allocate higher quality forage to high-producing livestock and ...


G77-374 Seasonal Prices For Meat Animals, Allen C. Wellman Jan 1977

G77-374 Seasonal Prices For Meat Animals, Allen C. Wellman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Seasonal variations in livestock prices seem to follow a similar pattern from year to year. For some classes of livestock, these seasonal swings in prices have been quite consistent for a number of years; while others have changed considerably over time.

Seasonal price fluctuations result mostly from seasonal supply changes or variations in marketings. For any given year a cyclical change in price may override the season pattern. Seasonal price changes during the 1972-76 period also were influenced by a price freeze, as well as changes in supply and demand.

Seasonal price changes are important factors to consider in planning ...


Ec77-865 Have It Your Way By Making A Will, John R. Uhrich, J. David Aiken, Philip A. Henderson Jan 1977

Ec77-865 Have It Your Way By Making A Will, John R. Uhrich, J. David Aiken, Philip A. Henderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Making a will is not the sad and gloomy picture painted by some people. Quite the contrary! A person who makes a will is creating his or her own blueprint for the future. A will, like life insurance, social security, or retirement plans, provides security and peace of mind. The person who has a will made can rest assured that property and loved ones will be taken care of precisely in the manner he or she desires. This publication presents basic information about wills, one of the most important documents a person can make or possess. This information can be ...


Ec77-122 Wheat Kernel Damage, Kim Anderson Jan 1977

Ec77-122 Wheat Kernel Damage, Kim Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

There are eight classes of wheat: Durum wheat, Hard Red Spring wheat, Hard Red Winter wheat, Soft Red Winter wheat, Hard White wheat, Soft White wheat, Unclassed wheat, and Mixed wheat.

This publication discusses the principal wheat kernel damage: germ (sick and mold); heat; black tip fungus; blight or scab; green (immature), sprout, insect and insect chewed; frost (blistered, candied, flaked, and discolored black or brown). It also discusses special grades: infested, ergoty, garlicky, light smutty; smutty, treated, dockage, shrunken and broken kernels, foreign material, and test weight per bushel.


G77-340 Scheduling Irrigation By Electrical Resistance Blocks, Paul E. Fischbach Jan 1977

G77-340 Scheduling Irrigation By Electrical Resistance Blocks, Paul E. Fischbach

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Delay of irrigation for a few days during a critical part of the growing season can be expensive. A week's delay in supplying irrigation water to corn or grain sorghum can reduce potential yield more than 30 bushels per acre.

Several methods are available to help you schedule the right amount of water at the right time. One of these methods uses electrical resistance blocks discussed in this NebGuide.