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Full-Text Articles in Education

Weather To Go To College, Uri Simonsohn Mar 2010

Weather To Go To College, Uri Simonsohn

Marketing Papers

Does current utility bias predictions of future utility for high stakes decisions? Here I provide field evidence consistent with such Projection Bias in one of life's most thought‐about decisions: college enrolment. After arguing and documenting with survey evidence that cloudiness increases the appeal of academic activities, I analyse the enrolment decisions of 1,284 prospective students who visited a university known for its academic strengths and recreational weaknesses. Consistent with the notion that current weather conditions influence decisions about future academic activities, I find that an increase in cloudcover of one standard deviation on the day of the ...


Clouds Make Nerds Look Good: Field Evidence Of The Impact Of Incidental Factors On Decision Making, Uri Simonsohn Apr 2007

Clouds Make Nerds Look Good: Field Evidence Of The Impact Of Incidental Factors On Decision Making, Uri Simonsohn

Marketing Papers

Abundant experimental research has documented that incidental primes and emotions are capable of influencing people's judgments and choices. This paper examines whether the influence of such incidental factors is large enough to be observable in the field, by analyzing 682 actual university admission decisions. As predicted, applicants' academic attributes are weighted more heavily on cloudier days and non‐academic attributes on sunnier days. The documented effects are of both statistical and practical significance: changes in cloud cover can increase a candidate's predicted probability of admission by an average of up to 11.9%. These results also shed light ...


What's A Testlet And Why Do We Need Them?, Howard Wainer, Eric T. Bradlow, Xiaohui Wang Jan 2007

What's A Testlet And Why Do We Need Them?, Howard Wainer, Eric T. Bradlow, Xiaohui Wang

Marketing Papers

In 1987, Wainer and Kiely proposed a name for a packet of test items that are administered together; they called such an aggregation a "testlet." Testlets had been in existence for a long time prior to 1987, albeit without this euphonious appellation. They had typically been used to boost testing efficiency in situations that examined an individual's ability to understand some sort of stimulus, for example, a reading passage, an information graph, a musical passage, or a table of numbers. In such situations, a substantial amount of examinee time is spent in processing the stimulus, and it was found ...


An Assessment Of Basic Computer Proficiency Among Active Internet Users: Test Construction, Calibration, Antecedents And Consequences, Eric T. Bradlow, Stephen J. Hoch, J. W. Hutchinson Sep 2002

An Assessment Of Basic Computer Proficiency Among Active Internet Users: Test Construction, Calibration, Antecedents And Consequences, Eric T. Bradlow, Stephen J. Hoch, J. W. Hutchinson

Marketing Papers

The purpose of this article is to describe our efforts to create a test of basic computer proficiency, examine its properties using parametric test scoring methods, and identify some antecedents and consequences that accompany differences in performance. We also consider how much insight people have into their level of knowledge by examining the relationship between our tested measure of computer knowledge and self-rated knowledge scores collected at the same time. This research also adds to the large body of existing empirical work on computer literacy in the student population, by looking at computer literacy in a more general sample of ...


Would Mandatory Attendance Be Effective For Economics Classes?, J. Scott Armstrong Jan 1994

Would Mandatory Attendance Be Effective For Economics Classes?, J. Scott Armstrong

Marketing Papers

Romer (1993) suggests that universities should undertake experiments that would test the value of mandatory attendance for economics courses. He presents evidence showing that those who attended his classes received higher grades on his exams and concluded that "an important part of the relationship [to the course grade] reflects a genuine effect of attendance." This conclusion is likely to be welcomed by some economics professors.

In this note, I address two issues. First, what does prior research imply about a relationship between attendance and learning? Second, does Romer's own evidence support his conclusion that mandatory attendance is beneficial?


The Restructured Wharton Mba: Inventing A New Paradigm, Jerry Yoram Wind Apr 1991

The Restructured Wharton Mba: Inventing A New Paradigm, Jerry Yoram Wind

Marketing Papers

On Tuesday, February 12, 1991, the faculty of the Wharton School approved a plan to design and test a new paradigm for its MBA curriculum—the most far-reaching restructuring of its MBA program since the 1960s.

The new graduate program, which will initially be launched with 130 students in two experimental cohorts this fall, not only creates a new framework for the MBA program. It also creates a mechanism for continuous innovation that will ensure that Wharton remains on the leading edge of management education in years to come.


Teacher Vs. Learner Responsibility In Management Education, J. Scott Armstrong Oct 1980

Teacher Vs. Learner Responsibility In Management Education, J. Scott Armstrong

Marketing Papers

A literature review suggested that behavioral changes occur more rapidly when the learner assumed responsibility. Natural learning, an approach to help learners assume responsibility, was compared with the traditional strategy in seven field experiments. It produced more than twice as many long-term behavioral changes. It was superior also for attitude change, but not for gains in knowledge.