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Series

University of Pennsylvania

Public Affairs, Public Policy and Public Administration

2007

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Education

Redesigning School Finance Systems, Allan Odden Feb 2007

Redesigning School Finance Systems, Allan Odden

CPRE Policy Briefs

CPRE researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have been working on school finance redesign since 1990. The issue that has driven this effort has been the goal of state standards-based education reform and, more recently, of the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act to teach all students to high standards. This goal has shifted the orientation of the education system from inputs to outcomes--student achievement to rigorous performance standards--with an attendant accountability focus at the school site. In the broader school finance community, this focus has induced a shift from "equity" to "adequacy," for both litigation and policy. Though ...


Teaching Matters: How State And Local Policymakers Can Improve The Quality Of Teachers And Teaching, Thomas B. Corcoran Feb 2007

Teaching Matters: How State And Local Policymakers Can Improve The Quality Of Teachers And Teaching, Thomas B. Corcoran

CPRE Policy Briefs

A growing body of evidence confirms what common sense has suggested all along: The quality of teaching in the public schools matters for how well students learn. An important corollary is that poor children, minority children, and children from nonEnglish-speaking homes are even more dependent on the quality of their teachers than are more affluent, English-speaking, White children. Pressures to improve teacher quality stem mainly from state efforts to hold local schools accountable for student achievement and from the requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act.

Policymakers want to know how to train, license, recruit, select, deploy, assign, develop ...


Misdiagnosing The Teacher Quality Problem, Richard Ingersoll Feb 2007

Misdiagnosing The Teacher Quality Problem, Richard Ingersoll

CPRE Policy Briefs

Few educational issues have received more attention in recent times than the problem of ensuring that our nation's elementary and secondary classrooms are all staffed with quality teachers. There is consensus that the quality of teachers and teaching matter--and undoubtedly are among the most important factors shaping the learning and growth of students. Moreover, there is consensus that serious problems exist with the quality of teachers and teaching in the United States. Beyond that, however, there appears to be little consensus and much disagreement--especially over what teacher quality entails and what the sources of, and solutions to, the problem ...


Study Of School Leadership: Working Paper - Measuring Leadership Practice, Jason Huff Jan 2007

Study Of School Leadership: Working Paper - Measuring Leadership Practice, Jason Huff

CPRE Working Papers

No abstract provided.


A Comparative Study Of Teacher Preparation And Qualifications In Six Nations, Richard Ingersoll Jan 2007

A Comparative Study Of Teacher Preparation And Qualifications In Six Nations, Richard Ingersoll

CPRE Research Reports

Across the educational systems of the world, few issues have received more attention in recent years than the problem of ensuring that elementary and secondary-school classrooms are all staffed with adequately qualified teachers (Mullis, et al., 2000; OECD, 1994, 2005; Wang, et al., 2003). Even in nations where students routinely score high on international exams, the issue of teacher quality is the subject of much concern. This is not surprising. Elementary and secondary schooling is mandatory in almost all nations and children are legally placed in the care of teachers for a significant portion of their lives. It is widely ...


Improving Educational Opportunities For Students Who Work, Laura W. Perna, Michelle Asha Cooper, Chunyan Li Jan 2007

Improving Educational Opportunities For Students Who Work, Laura W. Perna, Michelle Asha Cooper, Chunyan Li

GSE Publications

College students who cannot pay the price of attendance from some combination of personal financial resources and grants typically have three options: do not attend college, borrow money using public and private loans, and/or work. Data show that increasing shares of students are utilizing both loans and work to pay for college-related expenses (Baum, 2005). Much attention has focused on growth in borrowing (e.g., Baum, 2005; Perna, 2001), as well as potential consequences of borrowing for various aspects of students’ educational experiences, including persistence and degree completion (DesJardins, Ahlburg, & McCall, 2002; St. John, 2003) and graduate school enrollment (Choy & Carroll, 2000; Ehrenberg ...