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Series

Life Sciences

2005

StoryQUEST

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Education

Nf05-637 The Power Of Family Literacy, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-637 The Power Of Family Literacy, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Virtually all families want their children to learn to read and write, and to succeed in school, and are eager to provide any support necessary.

Family involvement in everyday language- and literacy-related activities has a significant impact on children's language dvevelopment acquisition of early literacy skills. Early language and literacy activities at home contribute to differences when children enter school.


Nf05-645 Infants And Toddlers — Developing More Than One Language, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-645 Infants And Toddlers — Developing More Than One Language, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

When infants and toddlers are developing more than one language, the goal is that they will learn English and develop fluency in their home language. Children can become truly bilingual and be able to use two or more languages with fequal fluency. Children, families, schools, and communities all benefit when children keep their connection to their language and heritage.


Nf05-644 Relationships: The Heart Of Language And Literacy, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-644 Relationships: The Heart Of Language And Literacy, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Infants and toddlers learn early language and literacy skills in the context of their relationships with the adults around them as if they are putting together a puzzle. Most of the puzzle pieces involve taking turns with the baby — your turn, my turn, your turn, my turn. The turns might be with actions or with talking. The turns might be very quick or rather slow.

This NebFact discusses turn-taking; what it involves and the strategies used.


Nf05-642 Symbols Of Literacy Development, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-642 Symbols Of Literacy Development, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Early environments matter and nurturing relationships are essential for literacy development of young children. Infants and toddlers who have secure relationships with their caregivers are more involved in literacy activities.

This NebFacts covers the interaction with symbols, physical and social features of symbols, and the use of words, symbols and print.


Nf95-641 Car — A Strategy For Learning, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf95-641 Car — A Strategy For Learning, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Language and literacy development starts at the very beginning of a child's life and is one of the main developmental events of early childhood. This process if facilitated by early adult-child interactions in which the adult guides and supports the child's learning by building on what the child already knows. Following the child's lead, a key strategy presented in Language Is the Key is one of the defining aspects of developmentally appropriate practice. It has been shown to successfuly facilitate early language development for children with and without disabilities.


Nf05-638 Sharing Stories, Songs And Books, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-638 Sharing Stories, Songs And Books, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Language and literacy begin with sharing stories, songs and books. When telling a story, you can talk about yourself, the child and his/her experiences, the child's family, things you've read, seen on TV and at the movies, things that happen to your at work, and stories your elders have told.

This NebFacts covers the different techniques of using storytelling strategies, songs, and books when interacting with your children.