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Series

Life Sciences

1987

Soil

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec88-116 Universal Soil Loss Equation: A Handbook For Nebraska Producers, A. J. Jones, D. Walters, W. G. Hance, Elbert C. Dickey, J.R. Culver Dec 1987

Ec88-116 Universal Soil Loss Equation: A Handbook For Nebraska Producers, A. J. Jones, D. Walters, W. G. Hance, Elbert C. Dickey, J.R. Culver

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Tons of soil are lost from agricultural fields in Nebraska each year as a result of water erosion. The accelerated loss of topsoil reduces the availability of plant nutrients and water needed for optimum crop production. In addition, the eroded soil frequently moves into surface waters causing sediment to be deposited in streams and reservoirs and nutrients to be released into other biological systems. The purposes of this workbook are to provide an understandng of how soil erosion estimates are determined, to estimate erosion control resulting from numerous cropping systems, and to inform the producer of alternative practices which may ...


G87-828 Growing Perennials, Don Steinegger, Anne Streich Jan 1987

G87-828 Growing Perennials, Don Steinegger, Anne Streich

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Planning, soil preparation, and maintenance are necessary in growing a perennial garden of color and interest throughout the growing season.

Herbaceous perennials are non-woody plants that live two or more years under local conditions. The above ground parts of these plants are generally killed to the ground by frost in the fall, but the roots and/or underground parts live through the winter. Growth is renewed and the cycle begins anew in the spring.

While perennials do not require yearly replanting, they still require regular maintenance. For best results, a proper site analysis, soil preparation and routine maintenance are necessary ...


G87-831 Identification Of Soil Compaction And Its Limitations To Root Growth, Alice J. Jones, Elbert C. Dickey, Dean E. Eisenhauer, R.A. Wiese Jan 1987

G87-831 Identification Of Soil Compaction And Its Limitations To Root Growth, Alice J. Jones, Elbert C. Dickey, Dean E. Eisenhauer, R.A. Wiese

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide will help you identify soil compaction and determine if compaction is limiting yield. Soil compaction is primarily caused by working or driving on wet fields. Compaction can develop at or below the soil surface (Figure 1) and can lead to inefficient fertilizer and water use and reduced yields. Observation of crop growth and soil surface conditions can give clues as to the extent of soil compaction.