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Series

Life Sciences

1987

Horticulture

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

G87-852 Growing Gladiolus, Amy J. Greving Jan 1987

G87-852 Growing Gladiolus, Amy J. Greving

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The gladiolus is as beautiful as it is easy to grow. Planting, culture, care, insects, and disease are discussed in this NebGuide.

Gladiolus are one of the most popular flowers for garden use, and are easy to grow. The plants, ranging from two to six feet in height, have sturdy sword-shaped leaves and produce flower spikes with trumpet-shaped florets borne in double rows.

A member of the iris family, gladiolus have great diversity of flower color and shape. Flower shapes range from those with plain petals to those that are deeply ruffled and cut. The colors cover the spectrum and ...


G87-856 Hedges, Don Steinegger Jan 1987

G87-856 Hedges, Don Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Hedges can be an attractive and functional part of home landscaping. This NebGuide outlines the steps for proper plant selection and establishment, care, and rejuvenation.

Not only are hedges attractive, but they serve some important landscape functions. Hedges, particularly sheared ones (formal), require time and some knowledge to establish them as well as annual pruning. It is also important to select suitable plant material and an appropriate site to minimize upkeep. Rapid growing plants like privet require more frequent shearing. A shady site or one with little air movement may require spraying for disease control.

Hedges mark boundaries such as ...


G87-836 Coldframes And Hotbeds, Dale T. Lindgren Jan 1987

G87-836 Coldframes And Hotbeds, Dale T. Lindgren

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Coldframes and hotbeds can help the home gardener in many ways. This NebGuide explains uses, construction, and management.

Hotbeds and coldframes are mini-greenhouses in that both use solar energy and sunlight. Coldframes and hotbeds can help the home gardener start, grow and maintain plant material and the commercial grower propagate and display plant material.

The main difference between hotbeds and coldframes is that hotbeds have a supplemental heat source. This supplemental heat source may be organic, such as manure, or non-organic, such as an electric heating cable. Construction can be simple and inexpensive or quite sophisticated. Hotbed/coldframe size can ...