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Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec88-116 Universal Soil Loss Equation: A Handbook For Nebraska Producers, A. J. Jones, D. Walters, W. G. Hance, Elbert C. Dickey, J.R. Culver Dec 1987

Ec88-116 Universal Soil Loss Equation: A Handbook For Nebraska Producers, A. J. Jones, D. Walters, W. G. Hance, Elbert C. Dickey, J.R. Culver

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Tons of soil are lost from agricultural fields in Nebraska each year as a result of water erosion. The accelerated loss of topsoil reduces the availability of plant nutrients and water needed for optimum crop production. In addition, the eroded soil frequently moves into surface waters causing sediment to be deposited in streams and reservoirs and nutrients to be released into other biological systems. The purposes of this workbook are to provide an understandng of how soil erosion estimates are determined, to estimate erosion control resulting from numerous cropping systems, and to inform the producer of alternative practices which may ...


The Computer As A Collection Management Tool, Suzanne B. Mclaren, Hugh H. Genoways, Duane A. Schlitter Jan 1987

The Computer As A Collection Management Tool, Suzanne B. Mclaren, Hugh H. Genoways, Duane A. Schlitter

Mammalogy Papers: University of Nebraska State Museum

Since the mid-1960s, discussion of computer use for information retrieval in museum collections has usually focused on research potential. Much attention has been given to the idea of networking and the ability to access data across great distances. However, the potential for collection management usage has also proven to be a legitimate rationale for computerization. Numerous aspects of collection management are discussed for which the computer may be employed. Topics include creating cross-reference files, updating taxonomic and geographic information, pinpointing mismatched specimens, locating lost and uncataloged material, controlling loan procedures, producing accession files for insurance purposes, curating all or part ...


G87-851 Improving Reproductive Performance And Productivity Of Beef Herds, Gene H. Deutscher Jan 1987

G87-851 Improving Reproductive Performance And Productivity Of Beef Herds, Gene H. Deutscher

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

NebGuide discusses management practices that can be used to improve reproduction and productivity of beef herds. The major objective of cow-calf producers should be to wean a calf from each cow every year. The average calf crop weaned in Nebraska is estimated at 80 calves weaned per 100 cows in breeding herds. A realistic goal is 90 to 95 calves weaned per 100 cows.


G87-860 How To Interpret The Dhia-230 Somatic Cell Count Report, Jeffrey F. Keown Jan 1987

G87-860 How To Interpret The Dhia-230 Somatic Cell Count Report, Jeffrey F. Keown

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide explains how to examine DHIA somatic cell count reports and use them as valuable aids in identifying the major causes of individual herds.

Losses to mastitis are estimated at more than $200 per cow annually. In Nebraska annual losses total more than $20 million dollars.


G87-835 Ecofarming: No-Till Ecofallow Proso Millet In Winter Wheat Stubble, Robert E. Ramsel, Lenis Alton Nelson, Gail A. Wicks Jan 1987

G87-835 Ecofarming: No-Till Ecofallow Proso Millet In Winter Wheat Stubble, Robert E. Ramsel, Lenis Alton Nelson, Gail A. Wicks

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

No-till farming is gaining acceptance in semiarid areas of the Central Great Plains. Proso millet can be planted no-till into wheat stubble. This NebGuide tells you how. No-till farming is rapidly gaining acceptance in semiarid areas of the Central Great Plains. Corn and sorghum are now being no-till planted directly into undisturbed wheat stubble and grown successfully. They are planted the spring following wheat harvest. Proso millet can also be planted no-till into wheat stubble.


G87-840 Miscellaneous General Fund Revenues In Nebraska, A.L. (Roy) Frederick Jan 1987

G87-840 Miscellaneous General Fund Revenues In Nebraska, A.L. (Roy) Frederick

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is one of a series of NebGuides on financing state and local government. Miscellaneous revenues supplement sales and income taxes.

Although general sales and use taxes and income taxes are the major sources of General Fund revenue for Nebraska state government, significant supplemental revenues come from "miscellaneous" sources.


Heg87-211 For Sale By Owner: The Right Choice For You?, Kathleen Parrott, Jana Lamplot Jan 1987

Heg87-211 For Sale By Owner: The Right Choice For You?, Kathleen Parrott, Jana Lamplot

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The purpose of this NebGuide is to help you decide if a "do-it-yourself" home sale is an appropriate choice. Steps in preparing and marketing a home are reviewed. Ideas to promote the sale and a decision-making checklist are included. The decision to sell your home yourself requires careful consideration. Saving the cost of a real estate agent's commission is a primary reason for "do-it-yourself" sales. However, this type of sale is not all profit. It is necessary to invest time, money and other resources, in preparing and marketing your house.


G87-852 Growing Gladiolus, Amy J. Greving Jan 1987

G87-852 Growing Gladiolus, Amy J. Greving

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The gladiolus is as beautiful as it is easy to grow. Planting, culture, care, insects, and disease are discussed in this NebGuide.

Gladiolus are one of the most popular flowers for garden use, and are easy to grow. The plants, ranging from two to six feet in height, have sturdy sword-shaped leaves and produce flower spikes with trumpet-shaped florets borne in double rows.

A member of the iris family, gladiolus have great diversity of flower color and shape. Flower shapes range from those with plain petals to those that are deeply ruffled and cut. The colors cover the spectrum and ...


G87-833 Culture Of Iris, Don Steinegger, Anne Streich Jan 1987

G87-833 Culture Of Iris, Don Steinegger, Anne Streich

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Iris culture emphasizes the best in site selection, planting, winter care and protection, and control of insects and diseases.

The iris is one of the most popular and beautiful of the garden flowers. With the range in plant type, size, and adaption, there is an iris for almost any location.

More than 200 species of iris have been found in the wild. From these species thousands of varieties have been named and made available. Plant size ranges from about 6 inches in the miniatures to more than 3 feet in the large types. Flowers can be 1 or 2 inches ...


G87-828 Growing Perennials, Don Steinegger, Anne Streich Jan 1987

G87-828 Growing Perennials, Don Steinegger, Anne Streich

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Planning, soil preparation, and maintenance are necessary in growing a perennial garden of color and interest throughout the growing season.

Herbaceous perennials are non-woody plants that live two or more years under local conditions. The above ground parts of these plants are generally killed to the ground by frost in the fall, but the roots and/or underground parts live through the winter. Growth is renewed and the cycle begins anew in the spring.

While perennials do not require yearly replanting, they still require regular maintenance. For best results, a proper site analysis, soil preparation and routine maintenance are necessary ...


G87-856 Hedges, Don Steinegger Jan 1987

G87-856 Hedges, Don Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Hedges can be an attractive and functional part of home landscaping. This NebGuide outlines the steps for proper plant selection and establishment, care, and rejuvenation.

Not only are hedges attractive, but they serve some important landscape functions. Hedges, particularly sheared ones (formal), require time and some knowledge to establish them as well as annual pruning. It is also important to select suitable plant material and an appropriate site to minimize upkeep. Rapid growing plants like privet require more frequent shearing. A shady site or one with little air movement may require spraying for disease control.

Hedges mark boundaries such as ...


G87-836 Coldframes And Hotbeds, Dale T. Lindgren Jan 1987

G87-836 Coldframes And Hotbeds, Dale T. Lindgren

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Coldframes and hotbeds can help the home gardener in many ways. This NebGuide explains uses, construction, and management.

Hotbeds and coldframes are mini-greenhouses in that both use solar energy and sunlight. Coldframes and hotbeds can help the home gardener start, grow and maintain plant material and the commercial grower propagate and display plant material.

The main difference between hotbeds and coldframes is that hotbeds have a supplemental heat source. This supplemental heat source may be organic, such as manure, or non-organic, such as an electric heating cable. Construction can be simple and inexpensive or quite sophisticated. Hotbed/coldframe size can ...


G87-839 Corn Rootworm Control, Leroy L. Peters, Lance J. Meinke, J. F. Witkowski Jan 1987

G87-839 Corn Rootworm Control, Leroy L. Peters, Lance J. Meinke, J. F. Witkowski

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Corn rootworms -- damage they cause, and how to control them.

Three kinds of rootworms attack corn in Nebraska -- the western, the northern, and the southern. The western is the most common and most damaging and can be found over the entire state. The northern is found mainly in the northeastern counties. The southern can be found over the entire state.


G87-838 Management Of Greenbugs In Sorghum (Revised May 1994), Robert J. Wright, Stephen D. Danielson, Zb Mayo Jan 1987

G87-838 Management Of Greenbugs In Sorghum (Revised May 1994), Robert J. Wright, Stephen D. Danielson, Zb Mayo

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the identification, biology and management options for greenbugs in Nebraska sorghum.

The greenbug is the most important insect pest of grain and forage sorghums in Nebraska. Although numbers fluctuate from year to year, greenbugs are a limiting factor to sorghum yield in most years. Their management is complicated by the fact that greenbugs have been able to evolve populations capable of overcoming plant resistance and organophosphate insecticides, so best management practices continue to change over time.

Another common aphid found in sorghum is the corn leaf aphid. Corn leaf aphids are often mistaken for greenbugs; however, they ...


G87-858 Juniper Blight Diseases, Luanne V. Coziahr, David S. Wysong Jan 1987

G87-858 Juniper Blight Diseases, Luanne V. Coziahr, David S. Wysong

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Recognition and control of several needle and twig blight pathogens which attack junipers.

Junipers are widely used throughout Nebraska in both ornamental landscape plantings and windbreaks. Eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana), Rocky Mountain juniper (J. scopulorum), and other common juniper species are subject to attack by several needle and twig blight pathogens. It is important to properly identify and separate the diseases involved, as each may require a different procedure for effective control.


G87-831 Identification Of Soil Compaction And Its Limitations To Root Growth, Alice J. Jones, Elbert C. Dickey, Dean E. Eisenhauer, R.A. Wiese Jan 1987

G87-831 Identification Of Soil Compaction And Its Limitations To Root Growth, Alice J. Jones, Elbert C. Dickey, Dean E. Eisenhauer, R.A. Wiese

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide will help you identify soil compaction and determine if compaction is limiting yield. Soil compaction is primarily caused by working or driving on wet fields. Compaction can develop at or below the soil surface (Figure 1) and can lead to inefficient fertilizer and water use and reduced yields. Observation of crop growth and soil surface conditions can give clues as to the extent of soil compaction.


G87-848 Control And Eradication Of Pseudorabies In Swine, Alex Hogg, George W. Beran Jan 1987

G87-848 Control And Eradication Of Pseudorabies In Swine, Alex Hogg, George W. Beran

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses various plans to control and eradicate an increasingly important disease of swine--Pseudorabies.

Introduction and History

Pseudorabies (Aujeszky's Disease) is an acute, frequently fatal disease affecting most species of domestic and wild animals. The disease is caused by a virus of the Herpesvirus group, and is characterized by a variety of clinical signs--those involving the nervous and respiratory systems being particularly prominent. Pseudorabies is a persistent cause of loss in both cattle and sheep in many countries throughout the world.

Pseudorabies is an increasingly important disease of swine in the U.S. This increase in importance has ...


G87-849 Vaccinations In Sheep Flocks, Dale M. Grotelueschen Jan 1987

G87-849 Vaccinations In Sheep Flocks, Dale M. Grotelueschen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

High economic return per dollar invested can result from proper flock health management. Vaccinations are part of health management.

A preventive health program in modern sheep production systems is advisable. High economic return per dollar invested can result from proper flock health management. Health management is much more than a vaccination program. Vaccinations themselves are considered for a variety of reasons. These include disease risk management and strict prevention. Vaccinations may also be indicated in situations where management practices other than vaccine administration do not produce optimum health or economic benefits.

It is not feasible to outline one vaccination program ...


G87-895 Pelvic Measurements For Reducing Calving Difficulty, Gene H. Deutscher Jan 1987

G87-895 Pelvic Measurements For Reducing Calving Difficulty, Gene H. Deutscher

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Pelvic measurements in heifers and bulls can be an important tool to help reduce the incidence and severity of calving difficulty. Calving difficulty results in a major economic loss to beef producers. This loss is estimated at $750 million annually nationwide. Calving difficulty increases calf death loss, cow mortality, labor and veterinary costs; it delays the return of cows to estrus and reduces conception rates. It also lowers calf weaning weight and market value, which results from breeding young heifers and cows to easy calving bulls to reduce calving difficulty. Studies show calf losses of 4 percent within 24 hours ...


Heg87-223 Understanding Grief And Loss, Herbert G. Lingren Jan 1987

Heg87-223 Understanding Grief And Loss, Herbert G. Lingren

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide defines loss, offers guidelines for dealing with grief and loss, presents psychological and emotional responses to loss, and describes ways to help people deal with bereavement.

Loss is defined as a "separation from, a detachment from something or someone of value." The magnitude of the loss and its meaning and value to the individual affects the intensity of a person's response. Therefore, it is virtually impossible to predict how any one person will respond to a particular loss. But it always causes some change in perception of one's self or lifestyle and some type of adaptation ...


G87-862 Holding Wet Corn With Aeration (Revised July 1995), David D. Jones, Robert D. Grisso Jan 1987

G87-862 Holding Wet Corn With Aeration (Revised July 1995), David D. Jones, Robert D. Grisso

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses aeration recommendations and corn moisture level limitations for holding wet corn under Nebraska conditions.

Corn is a perishable commodity with a limited shelf life that depends on the moisture content and temperature of the corn. `Shelf life' is the length of time good quality, aerated shelled corn can be stored before losing one-half percent of dry matter. With this amount of dry matter decomposition, it is assumed that the corn loses some quality, but maintains its market grade.


G87-845 Electrical Systems For Agricultural Buildings (Recommended Practices), Gerald R. Bodman, Laverne E. Stetson, Jack L. Schinstock Jan 1987

G87-845 Electrical Systems For Agricultural Buildings (Recommended Practices), Gerald R. Bodman, Laverne E. Stetson, Jack L. Schinstock

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes some of the specialized wiring practices and equipment required in agricultural buildings.

During June 1982, electrical system failures resulted in animal losses in excess of $100,000 on three Nebraska swine farms. In 1983, more than $45,000 worth of feeder pigs were electrocuted on another Nebraska farm. Dairy and beef animals also have been electrocuted--as have producers. A survey of more than 400 Nebraska farms revealed that over 50 percent have problems due to poor on-farm wiring. A more recent survey of 14 farms revealed none with 100 percent properly wired buildings. Many had conditions which ...


G87-846 Electrical Systems For Agricultural Buildings (Checklist), Gerald R. Bodman, Laverne E. Stetson, Jack L. Schinstock Jan 1987

G87-846 Electrical Systems For Agricultural Buildings (Checklist), Gerald R. Bodman, Laverne E. Stetson, Jack L. Schinstock

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide is a checklist to help in evaluating both existing and new electrical installations for agricultural buildings.

Good electrical system design and installation is required to assure a safe, efficient system. Good practices and appropriate equipment are essential.


Ec87-726 Mastitis Control Guidelines, Gerald R. Bodman, Duane N. Rice, Don J. Kubik Jan 1987

Ec87-726 Mastitis Control Guidelines, Gerald R. Bodman, Duane N. Rice, Don J. Kubik

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

These mastitis control guidelines were prepared by UNL personnel based on current literature and experience with the Nebraska mastitis control program, the demonstration herds, and many on-site dairy farm evaluations. This information will help producers and others in the dairy industry to understand, establish and maintain a comprehensive mastitis control program. Recommendations and procedures presented in the guidelines will allow the producer to develop an effective mastitis control program. When the recommendations are coupled with a conscientious and dedicated attitude, the result will be less mastitis and more better-quality milk at a lower production cost.


G87-834 Leafy Spurge (Revised February 1989), R.S. Moomaw, Alex Martin, R.N. Stougaard Jan 1987

G87-834 Leafy Spurge (Revised February 1989), R.S. Moomaw, Alex Martin, R.N. Stougaard

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Identification and control of leafy spurge, a noxious weed established in about three-fourths of Nebraska's counties, is discussed here.

Leafy spurge, (Euphorbia esula L.) introduced to the United States from Eurasia in 1827, has become a troublesome weed in North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Montana and Nebraska.

Leafy spurge is found in about three-fourths of Nebraska's counties. It is most common in the state's northern and eastern areas. Leafy spurge is found primarily on untilled land such as pastures, range, roadsides, woodlands and farmsteads. Leafy spurge is a noxious weed according to the Nebraska Seed Law and ...


Ec87-107 Nebraska Proso And Sunflower Variety Tests, 1987, Lenis Alton Nelson Jan 1987

Ec87-107 Nebraska Proso And Sunflower Variety Tests, 1987, Lenis Alton Nelson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of proso and sunflower variety trials conducted by the Panhandle Research and Extension Center, High Plains Agricultural Laboratory, and Northwest Agricultural Laboratory. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


Ec87-420 Household Inventory, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue Jan 1987

Ec87-420 Household Inventory, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A household inventory is an itemized list of a household's possessions and an estimate of their worth. Making a household inventory will benefit you in several ways:

• The inventory can help you determine how much insurance you need for household goods and personal items.

• It will furnish a record on which to base insurance claims in the event of an insured loss or theft.

• It will show money value of household goods and personal items for net worth statements.

• It can be useful in planning for replacements of household furnishings and equipment and personal items.

This publication discusses the ...


Ec87-419 Home Furnishings Care — Cleaning And Stain Removal, Shirley Niemeyer Jan 1987

Ec87-419 Home Furnishings Care — Cleaning And Stain Removal, Shirley Niemeyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Furniture and accessories are a major investment. With proper care, furnishings can be a lifetime investment. Many new and tradtional materials are used in furnishings and accessories. Knowing how to care for these materials can prevent damage. Selecting the right product for the job will save time, money, frustration and disappointments; and do a better job. Procedures for caring for different types of furnishings materials are given in this booklet.


G87-859 Fertilizer Recommendations For Soybean (Revised August 2006), Richard B. Ferguson, Charles A. Shapiro, Achim R. Dobermann, Charles S. Wortmann Jan 1987

G87-859 Fertilizer Recommendations For Soybean (Revised August 2006), Richard B. Ferguson, Charles A. Shapiro, Achim R. Dobermann, Charles S. Wortmann

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Soybean production in Nebraska has expanded significantly over the past twenty years and is second only to corn in area planted, at almost five million acres. In general, the fertilizer requirements for soybean are typically less than for other crops such as corn, sorghum, and wheat. This guide provides recommendations on how to manage soil fertility with fertilizer and lime applications to optimize the profitability of soybean production.