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Full-Text Articles in Education

Going Multimodal: Programmatic, Curricular, And Classroom Change, Chanon Adsanatham, Phil Alexander, Kerrie Carsey, Abby Dubisar, Wioleta Fedeczko, Denise Landrum, Cynthia Lewiecki-Wilson, Heidi Mckee, Kristen Moore, Gina Patterson, Michele Polak Mar 2013

Going Multimodal: Programmatic, Curricular, And Classroom Change, Chanon Adsanatham, Phil Alexander, Kerrie Carsey, Abby Dubisar, Wioleta Fedeczko, Denise Landrum, Cynthia Lewiecki-Wilson, Heidi Mckee, Kristen Moore, Gina Patterson, Michele Polak

English Publications

AS THE STUDENTS NOTE IN this epigraph, we do not live in a monomodal world. Rather, we experience the world and communicate through multiple modalities. "To confine" students to learning in only one mode, typically the textual mode in first-year writing courses, indeed limits, students' understanding and creative potential-a point that has reemerged in considerations of education and the teaching of writing...


Learner Fit In Scaling Up Automated Writing Evaluation, Elena Cotos, Sarah R. Huffman Jan 2013

Learner Fit In Scaling Up Automated Writing Evaluation, Elena Cotos, Sarah R. Huffman

English Publications

Valid evaluations of automated writing evaluation (AWE) design, development, and implementation should integrate the learners’ perspective in order to ensure the attainment of desired outcomes. This paper explores the learner fit quality of the Research Writing Tutor (RWT), an emerging AWE tool tested with L2 writers at an early stage of its development. Employing a mixed-methods approach, the authors sought to answer questions regarding the nature of learners’ interactional modifications with RWT and their perceptions of appropriateness of its feedback about the communicative effectiveness of research article Introductions discourse. The findings reveal that RWT’s move, step, and sentence-level feedback ...


Motivational Scaffolding, Politeness, And Writing Center Tutoring, Jo Mackiewicz, Isabelle Thompson Jan 2013

Motivational Scaffolding, Politeness, And Writing Center Tutoring, Jo Mackiewicz, Isabelle Thompson

English Publications

Writing center tutors know that improving writing skills requires sustained effort over a long period of time. They also know that motivation - the drive to actively invest in sustained effort toward a goal- is essential for writing improvement. However, a tutor may not work with the same student more than once, so tutorials often need to focus on what can be done in a single 30- to 60-minute conference. Further, although tutors are likely to attempt to motivate students to invest time and effort in improving their writing, when writers leave the writing center, tutors' influence might end with the ...


The Structural Consistency Of A Six-Factor Model Of Academic Self-Concept Among Culturally Diverse Preadolescents In The United States, Gary Ockey, Sarah Abercrombie Jan 2013

The Structural Consistency Of A Six-Factor Model Of Academic Self-Concept Among Culturally Diverse Preadolescents In The United States, Gary Ockey, Sarah Abercrombie

English Publications

For decades, research has indicated that preadolescents’ self-concept is comprised of subject-specific academic factors, a general academic factor, and several nonacademic factors. More recently, there have been some indications that academic self-concept might further be differentiated into competence and affect factors, at least for some preadolescent ethnic groups. This study examines the extent to which a 6-factor model of academic self-concept, in which competence and affect are distinct, is tenable for White, Hispanic, and Native American preadolescents. A total of 313 White, 331 Hispanic, and 224 Native American preadolescents from the southwestern United States were administered a modified version of ...


Cultural Historical Activity Theory And Student Writing, David R. Russell Jan 2013

Cultural Historical Activity Theory And Student Writing, David R. Russell

English Publications

Writing, often in conjunction with other media, is profoundly important to higher education, as it is to other modern institutions students will enter. Student writing mediates much of the activity of learning, and the most crucial parts, typically, such as assessment. Yet in higher education, writing often is devalued or even dismissed as a set of easily generalizable, elementary skills of transcribing speech or thought that students should have learned earlier in secondary or elementary school. This remedial model, and the tradition of complaint and cascading blame that goes with it, results not only in remedial courses but also, often ...


Towards Effective Integration And Positive Impact Of Automated Writing Evaluation In L2 Writing, Elena Cotos Jan 2012

Towards Effective Integration And Positive Impact Of Automated Writing Evaluation In L2 Writing, Elena Cotos

English Publications

The increasing dominance of English has elevated the need to develop an ability to effectively communicate in writing, and this has put a strain on second language education programs worldwide. Faced with time-consuming and copious commenting on student drafts and inspired by the promise of computerized writing assessment, many "educational technology enthusiasts are looking to A WE [automated writing evaluation] as a silver bullet for language and literacy development" (Warschauer & Ware, 2006, p. 175). This chapter reviews what AWE offers for learners and teachers and raises a number of controversies regarding A WE effectiveness with the underlying message that clear ...


Review Of Wimba Voice 6.0 Collaborative Suite, Elena Cotos Jan 2011

Review Of Wimba Voice 6.0 Collaborative Suite, Elena Cotos

English Publications

Wimba Voice 6.0TM is a component of the Wimba Collaboraton SuiteTM 6.0, which is a set of tools for online communication that combines a series of interactive technologies. Wimba Voice allows teachers to complement their pedagogical approaches with five web-based applications: Voice Authoring, Voice Board, Voice Podcaster, Voice Presenter, and Voice Email. These applications add audio and video components to asynchronous communication and can be easily integrated into different course management environments (e.g., Angel, Blackboard, Moodle, WebCT). Consequently, Wimba Voice has attracted the interest of an increasing number of language educators who are striving to enhance teaching ...


Potential Of Automated Writing Evaluation Feedback, Elena Cotos Jan 2011

Potential Of Automated Writing Evaluation Feedback, Elena Cotos

English Publications

This paper presents an empirical evaluation of automated writing evaluation (AWE) feedback used for L2 academic writing teaching and learning. It introduces the Intelligent Academic Discourse Evaluator (IADE), a new web-based AWE program that analyzes the introduction section to research articles and generates immediate, individualized, and discipline-specific feedback. The purpose of the study was to investigate the potential of IADE’s feedback. A mixed-methods approach with a concurrent transformative strategy was employed. Quantitative data consisted of responses to Likert-scale, yes/no, and open-ended survey questions; automated and human scores for first and final drafts; and pre-/posttest scores. Qualitative data ...


Cooperation Between Science Teachers And Esl Teachers: A Register Perspective, Tammy Slater, Bernard Mohan Jan 2010

Cooperation Between Science Teachers And Esl Teachers: A Register Perspective, Tammy Slater, Bernard Mohan

English Publications

Cooperation between English as a second or other language (ESOL) and content-area teachers, often difficult to achieve, is hard to assess linguistically in a revealing way. This article employs register analysis (which is different from, but complementary to, genre analysis) in a Systemic Functional Linguistic perspective to show how an ESOL teacher uses the same content-area task as a cooperating science teacher so that she can provide a theory–practice cycle similar to that of the science teacher, but at a level that reflects and builds on the language abilities of her students. The task allows her to assess her ...


'The World Is Too Messy': The Challenge Of Historical Literacy In A General-Education Course, David R. Russell, Arturo Yanez, Corey Smith Jan 2009

'The World Is Too Messy': The Challenge Of Historical Literacy In A General-Education Course, David R. Russell, Arturo Yanez, Corey Smith

English Publications

The problem with implementing writing-intensive (or writing-emphasis) liberal arts general education (GE) courses is as evident as it is underacknowledged; that is, this seemingly well-bounded, modest reform involves significant change-on multiple levels and for multiple players in complex institutional and disciplinary activity systems. We know a little about such issues: Writing-across-the-curriculum (WAC) programs are often said to present new challenges for teachers, such as a felt tension between the demands of teaching writing and covering content, and the need for substantial background in writing pedagogy (Russell, "Writing in the Academic Disciplines). Although such tensions are both urgent and real, they ...


Comparing Apples And Oranges? Pedagogical Approaches To Intonation In British And American English, John Levis Jan 2005

Comparing Apples And Oranges? Pedagogical Approaches To Intonation In British And American English, John Levis

English Publications

No abstract provided.


Call Evaluation By Developers, A Teacher, And Students, Joan Jamieson, Carol Chapelle, Sherry Preiss Jan 2005

Call Evaluation By Developers, A Teacher, And Students, Joan Jamieson, Carol Chapelle, Sherry Preiss

English Publications

Researchers and teachers agree that evaluation of CALL should ideally inform pedagogical choices about how best to use CALL, but how to go about such an evaluation is not clear. This study offers an example of a context-based evaluation by operationalizing criteria for CALL evaluation and administering the instruments to three groups of stakeholders: the people who developed the content for the CALL materials, the teacher, and the students. The CALL materials were Longman English online (LEO). The setting was a community college English as a second language class in New York. Results, which focused on the agreement among stakeholders ...


Putting Principles Into Practice, Joan Jamieson, Carol Chapelle, Sherry Preiss Jan 2004

Putting Principles Into Practice, Joan Jamieson, Carol Chapelle, Sherry Preiss

English Publications

CALL evaluation might ideally draw on principles from fields such as second language acquisition, language pedagogy, instructional design, and testing and measurement in order to make judgments about criteria such as elaborated input, feedback, collaborative learning, authentic tasks, navigation, screen design, reliability, validity, impact, and practicality. In this study, a subset of criteria were used to evaluate the design of English as a second or foreign language (ESL/EFL) online courses and assessments, Longman English Online. This article illustrates how a set of principles suggested evaluation criteria which, in turn, suggested particular variables for the instructional design; these variables, again ...


The Kind-Ness Of Genre: An Activity Theory Analysis Of High School Teachers' Perception Of Genre In Portfolio Assessment Across The Curriculum, David R. Russell Jan 2002

The Kind-Ness Of Genre: An Activity Theory Analysis Of High School Teachers' Perception Of Genre In Portfolio Assessment Across The Curriculum, David R. Russell

English Publications

At the 1998 Genre conference, Peter Medway asked, "Is genre such a capacious concept that it is too fuzzy to do much analytical work?" In this chapter I look at a group of high school teachers from different disciplines who must, as part of the work of assessing student portfolios of writing across the curriculum, discuss genre, work with it, to decide which student texts meet the statewide criteria for a "good" text. In a broader sense, they must work with genre to decide what genres they will assign and teaching their (discipline specific) classes to help students meet the ...


Innovative Language Learning: Achieving The Vision, Carol Chapelle Jan 2001

Innovative Language Learning: Achieving The Vision, Carol Chapelle

English Publications

The technologies demonstrated at the InSTIL and EUROCALL 2000 conferences were very inspiring. They gave participants the sense that the technologies of their wildest imaginations are at last materializing, particularly in long awaited advances in speech technologies. Some challenges, however, remain ahead as attempts are made to put these technologies to use in CALL. Past experience demonstrates for example that software designed for recognition of a proficient speaker’s language is different than that required for learner language. It is also evident that while language use may be critical for language acquisition, language use does not necessarily indicate language acquisition ...


Methodilogical Issues In Research On Learner-Computer Interactions In Call, Volker Hegelheimer, Carol Chapelle Jan 2000

Methodilogical Issues In Research On Learner-Computer Interactions In Call, Volker Hegelheimer, Carol Chapelle

English Publications

CALL materials may provide a mechanism for implementing theoretically-ideal conditions for second language acquisition and for conducting empirical research to investigate effects of these conditions. This paper explores methodological issues involved in realizing this potential by focusing on investigation of the noticing hypothesis (Schmidt, 1990) in CALL reading materials. It reviews the problem of assessing noticing in classroom and experimental settings through a) conditions for noticing, b) retrospective assessment, and c) concurrent assessment. Concurrent assessment, which provides the most direct measure of noticing, is illustrated through CALL materials that gather data on noticing, test retention of word meaning, and calculate ...


From Reading Theory To Testing Practice, Carol Chapelle Jan 1999

From Reading Theory To Testing Practice, Carol Chapelle

English Publications

This chapter acts as a link between the theoretical concerns laid out in the previous section and the computer-adaptive L2 testing issues and practices discussed in this part. It defines and situates critical testing concepts used by authors in this section-test purpose, inference and construct definition-to show potential connections of theory and research in L2 reading to design and development of computer-adaptive reading tests.


Research Questions For A Call Research Agenda: A Reply To Rafael Salaberry, Carol Chapelle Jan 1999

Research Questions For A Call Research Agenda: A Reply To Rafael Salaberry, Carol Chapelle

English Publications

I am grateful to Rafael Salaberry for his comments on my paper "CALL in the year 2000: Still in search of research paradigms?" takes up the discussion that I hoped the paper would motivate about fundamental issues in CALL research--issues such as what the relevant research questions are, why particular research methods are appropriate, and how CALL research relates to second language acquisition (SLA) research. In the interest of moving the discussion forward, I have responded to each of the points that Salaberry has raised. Points (a) through (e) below are quoted directly from his paper:


Activity Theory And Process Approaches: Writing (Power) In School, And Society, David R. Russel Jan 1999

Activity Theory And Process Approaches: Writing (Power) In School, And Society, David R. Russel

English Publications

Breaking with the still-dominant process tradition in composition studies, post-process theory―or at least the different incarnations of post-process theory discussed by the contributors represented in this collection of original essays―endorses the fundamental idea that no codifiable or generalizable writing process exists or could exist. Post-process theorists hold that the practice of writing cannot be captured by a generalized process or a "big" theory.

Most post-process theorists hold three assumptions about the act of writing: writing is public; writing is interpretive; and writing is situated. The first assumption is the commonsensical claim that writing constitutes a public interchange. By ...


Multimedia Call: Lessons To Be Learned From Research On Instructed Sla, Carol Chapelle Jan 1998

Multimedia Call: Lessons To Be Learned From Research On Instructed Sla, Carol Chapelle

English Publications

This paper suggests that some design features and evaluation criteria for multimedia CALL might be developed on the basis of hypotheses about ideal conditions for second language acquisition (SLA). It outlines a relevant theory of SLA and enumerates the hypotheses it implies for ideal conditions such as input saliency, opportunities for interaction, and learner focus on communication. Implications of each hypothesis for multimedia CALL design and evaluation are outlined and exemplified.


Call In The Year 2000: Still In Search Of Research Paradigms?, Carol Chapelle Jan 1997

Call In The Year 2000: Still In Search Of Research Paradigms?, Carol Chapelle

English Publications

Advancements in the design and use of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) activities require that key questions about CALL be identified and effective research methods be used to answer them. In this paper, I suggest looking to research on other types of second language (L2) classroom learning activities for guidance in framing CALL research questions and in discovering relevant research methods. I begin with examples from the CALL literature demonstrating the diverse perspectives (e.g., cognitive psychology, constructivism, psycholinguistics) which have been suggested as ways of approaching CALL research. I then summarize the research questions and methods of L2 classroom research ...


Validity Issues In Computer-Assisted Strategy Assessment For Language Learners, Carol Chapelle Jan 1996

Validity Issues In Computer-Assisted Strategy Assessment For Language Learners, Carol Chapelle

English Publications

This article probes validity issues of computer-assisted strategy assessment (CASA) in second-language (L2) acquisition research. Using two CASA studies, it reviews the metacognitive and cognitive strategies. It discusses trait-oriented and interactionist approaches to the concept of strategy, and examines validity by focusing on "advance preparation" and "resourcing," examples of trait-oriented and interactionist strategies, respectively. It suggests additional forms of validity evidence and describes applications of CASA as well as problems associated with this form of measurement.