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Series

Educational Assessment, Evaluation, and Research

English Publications

1999

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

From Reading Theory To Testing Practice, Carol Chapelle Jan 1999

From Reading Theory To Testing Practice, Carol Chapelle

English Publications

This chapter acts as a link between the theoretical concerns laid out in the previous section and the computer-adaptive L2 testing issues and practices discussed in this part. It defines and situates critical testing concepts used by authors in this section-test purpose, inference and construct definition-to show potential connections of theory and research in L2 reading to design and development of computer-adaptive reading tests.


Research Questions For A Call Research Agenda: A Reply To Rafael Salaberry, Carol Chapelle Jan 1999

Research Questions For A Call Research Agenda: A Reply To Rafael Salaberry, Carol Chapelle

English Publications

I am grateful to Rafael Salaberry for his comments on my paper "CALL in the year 2000: Still in search of research paradigms?" takes up the discussion that I hoped the paper would motivate about fundamental issues in CALL research--issues such as what the relevant research questions are, why particular research methods are appropriate, and how CALL research relates to second language acquisition (SLA) research. In the interest of moving the discussion forward, I have responded to each of the points that Salaberry has raised. Points (a) through (e) below are quoted directly from his paper:


Activity Theory And Process Approaches: Writing (Power) In School, And Society, David R. Russel Jan 1999

Activity Theory And Process Approaches: Writing (Power) In School, And Society, David R. Russel

English Publications

Breaking with the still-dominant process tradition in composition studies, post-process theory―or at least the different incarnations of post-process theory discussed by the contributors represented in this collection of original essays―endorses the fundamental idea that no codifiable or generalizable writing process exists or could exist. Post-process theorists hold that the practice of writing cannot be captured by a generalized process or a "big" theory.

Most post-process theorists hold three assumptions about the act of writing: writing is public; writing is interpretive; and writing is situated. The first assumption is the commonsensical claim that writing constitutes a public interchange. By ...