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Educational Assessment, Evaluation, and Research

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1998

Institution
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Articles 61 - 65 of 65

Full-Text Articles in Education

The Organization And Planning Of Adult Education, Theodore J. Kowalski Jan 1998

The Organization And Planning Of Adult Education, Theodore J. Kowalski

Educational Leadership Faculty Publications

The heightened interest in and the rapid expansion of adult education has become a trend in a variety of environments. In order to serve these developing areas, educators, personnel directors, as well as staff development specialists require improved methods for planning learning activities within their own unique organizational contexts.

In The Organization and Planning of Adult Education Kowalski examines the issues created by providing a social service in diverse organizational settings and presents a format for initiating and developing adult education programs. In order to comprehend the complexity of the context of programming within an organization, two novel components are ...


Qualitative-Quantitative Research Methodology: Exploring The Interactive Continuum, Isadore Newman, Carolyn Ridenour Jan 1998

Qualitative-Quantitative Research Methodology: Exploring The Interactive Continuum, Isadore Newman, Carolyn Ridenour

Educational Leadership Faculty Publications

Rejecting the artificial dichotomy between qualitative and quantitative research strategies in the social and behavioral sciences, the authors argue that the two approaches are neither mutually exclusive nor interchangeable; rather, the actual relationship between the two paradigms is one of isolated events on a continuum of scientific inquiry.


Taking Instruction Online: The Art Of Delivery, Donna R. Everett Jan 1998

Taking Instruction Online: The Art Of Delivery, Donna R. Everett

Faculty Research at Morehead State University

The notion that people seek to make meaning out of their world, whether it is the classroom or the living room, is not a new one. Educational philosophers and learning theorists have attempted to explain how learners learn and construct meaning from instruction or the classroom. Stimulus-response theorists (Thorndike, Guthrie, Pavlov—as cited in Hilgard & Bower, 1966; Watson, 1960; and Skinner, 1960) view learners as reactive, passive robots only responding when stimulated by something outside of themselves. Reese & Overton (1970) propose to call this the mechanistic world view—any change in the learners comes from outside of themselves. Organismic theorists (Dewey, Tolman—cited in Kingsley & Garry 1957; Lewin, 1951; Combs & Snygg, 1959; Bruner, 1968; and Freire, 1970), on the other hand, contend that learners are active, organized entities who seek meaning from their ...


Research In Mathematics Education: A Contemporary Perspective, Alistair Mcintosh (Ed.) Jan 1998

Research In Mathematics Education: A Contemporary Perspective, Alistair Mcintosh (Ed.)

ECU Publications Pre. 2011

The twelve chapters in this book-all but two written by researchers in Australian universities-provide ample evidence of the impressive contributions currently being made by Australia to research in mathematics education. The authors' fields of inquiry are diverse: they include discussion of the roles of language and imagery, problem posing and problem solving, students' beliefs and students' thinking, gambling and mental computation. T!1eir methodologies are no less diverse, incorporating descriptions of both quantitative and qualitative research projects, including action research in classrooms, theoretical perspectives and the development of theoretical models, reviews of research, surveys, clinical interviews and descriptions of new ...


Instructional Policy And Classroom Performance: The Mathematics Reform In California, David K. Cohen, Heather C. Hill Jan 1998

Instructional Policy And Classroom Performance: The Mathematics Reform In California, David K. Cohen, Heather C. Hill

CPRE Research Reports

Educational reformers increasingly seek to manipulate policies regarding assessment, curriculum, and professional development in order to improve instruction. They assume that manipulating these elements of instructional policy will change teachers' practice, which will then improve student performance. We formalize these ideas into a rudimentary model of the relations among instructional policy, teaching, and learning. We propose that successful instructional policies are themselves instructional in nature: because teachers figure as a key connection between policy and practice, their opportunities to learn about and from policy are a crucial influence both on their practice, and, at least indirectly, on student achievement. Using ...