Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Education

Making Oral Communication A Successful Part Of The Common Core, Jon A. Hess Apr 2015

Making Oral Communication A Successful Part Of The Common Core, Jon A. Hess

Communication Faculty Publications

Adoption of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) represents the first time that oral communication has been included in the curriculum requirements for K–12 education in many states. If done well, this change will provide important benefits to students. However, effective implementation will require collaboration among policymakers, educators, and experts in oral communication.

As educators work to strengthen primary and secondary education in the United States, many agree that schools need educational standards that are grounded in today’s needs and shared across states. The CCSS have emerged as a potential solution, and the majority of states have adopted ...


Communication And The Common Core: Disciplinary Opportunities, Joesph M. Valenzano Mar 2015

Communication And The Common Core: Disciplinary Opportunities, Joesph M. Valenzano

Communication Faculty Publications

The subject of how to strengthen primary and secondary education in the United States is widely discussed in news and popular media. While an extensive range of opinions have been expressed, the common thread is that these issues are normally situated in the domain of politicians and K-12 teachers. Primary and secondary education are rarely addressed by scholars who publish in Communication Education.

This divide between Communication researchers in higher education and K-12 practitioners reflects generally weak connections between the two domains. As seems fitting for our changing times, that situation is also ripe for change. In tandem with the ...


Consistency And Change: The (R)Evolution Of The Basic Communication Course, Joesph M. Valenzano, Samuel P. Wallace, Sherwyn P. Morreale Oct 2014

Consistency And Change: The (R)Evolution Of The Basic Communication Course, Joesph M. Valenzano, Samuel P. Wallace, Sherwyn P. Morreale

Communication Faculty Publications

The basic communication course, with its roots in classical Greece and Rome, is frequently a required course in general education. The course often serves as our “front porch,” welcoming new students to the Communication discipline. This essay first outlines early traditions in oral communication instruction and their influence on future iterations of the course. In addition, because fundamental changes in higher education in more modern times affected emphases and delivery of the course, we focus on the relationship between general education and the basic course and the significant curricular changes to the course during the latter part of the 20th ...


Suit My Heart: Staging Foster Youth Narratives That Hit Home, Michelle Hayford Jan 2014

Suit My Heart: Staging Foster Youth Narratives That Hit Home, Michelle Hayford

Communication Faculty Publications

While devising Suit My Heart, I relied upon my training in the ‘three A’s’ of performance studies conceived by my late mentor Dwight Conquergood as “artistry, analysis and activism” (2002: 152). With these ‘three A’s’ in mind, I set out to facilitate a devising process and create an artistic product that would positively serve all communities involved. The quality of the project would be determined not only by the efficacy of the play that we produced in the end, but by the personal growth of my students and the empowerment of our community partners throughout the process. Discovering ...


The Risks And Rewards Of Serving As A Department Chair, Jon A. Hess May 2013

The Risks And Rewards Of Serving As A Department Chair, Jon A. Hess

Communication Faculty Publications

Serving as chair is a significant point in the career of any faculty member who inhabits the office. It is a position with high highs and low lows, significant stressors and some perks, the chance to have a positive impact on a program, and the near certainty that at some point you will generate disagreement with almost everyone in the department. The department chair is a boundary position between the university administration and the faculty; a chair inhabits both worlds, but resides fully in neither. Chairs are charged with numerous responsibilities and often lack full authority needed to accomplish their ...


Helping Junior Faculty Achieve Success In Promotion And Tenure, Jon A. Hess Jul 2012

Helping Junior Faculty Achieve Success In Promotion And Tenure, Jon A. Hess

Communication Faculty Publications

Part and parcel of the chair’s job is to prepare junior faculty to achieve success. In academic departments that typically means achieving tenure and promotion to associate professor. In my experience, the success of a junior faculty member has as much to do with what the department and chair do as with the faculty member’s native ability. Junior faculty need to learn what activities are rewarded and what are not, what strategies they may use during their probationary period to develop the evidence needed for a successful tenure case, and how to present their materials in their file ...


Building Support For The Introductory Oral Communication Course: Strategies For Widespread And Enduring Support On Campus, Jon A. Hess Jan 2012

Building Support For The Introductory Oral Communication Course: Strategies For Widespread And Enduring Support On Campus, Jon A. Hess

Communication Faculty Publications

A strong introductory course is important for many communication departments, for the discipline, and for meeting our obligation to society. This paper utilizes the example of a recent curricular reform that threatened to eliminate a required oral communication course to reflect on strategies departments can use to build widespread and lasting support for the course. The paper reviews the events that led to the challenge and details the department’s response, which offers lessons that may be useful for other institutions. Four lessons include:

* Tailoring the introductory course to the institution’s needs and mission

* Involvement in university work

* Making ...


Faculty And Student Expectations And Perceptions Of E-Mail Communication In A Campus And Distance Doctor Of Pharmacy Program, Pamela A. Foral, Paul D. Turner, Michael S. Monaghan, Ryan W. Walters, Jennifer J. Merkel, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz, Thomas J. Lenz Dec 2010

Faculty And Student Expectations And Perceptions Of E-Mail Communication In A Campus And Distance Doctor Of Pharmacy Program, Pamela A. Foral, Paul D. Turner, Michael S. Monaghan, Ryan W. Walters, Jennifer J. Merkel, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz, Thomas J. Lenz

Communication Faculty Publications

Objective. To examine faculty members’ and students’ expectations and perceptions of e-mail communication in a dual pathway pharmacy program. Methods. Three parallel survey instruments were administered to campus students, distance students, and faculty members, respectively. Focus groups with students and faculty were conducted. Results. Faculty members perceived themselves as more accessible and approachable by e-mail than either group of students did. Campus students expected a shorter faculty response time to e-mail and for faculty members to be more available than did distance students. Conclusion. E-mail is an effective means of computer-mediated communication between faculty members and students and can be ...


Pushing Past The Walls: Media Literacy, The “Emancipated” Classroom, And A Really Severe Learning Curve, Adam W. Tyma Jan 2009

Pushing Past The Walls: Media Literacy, The “Emancipated” Classroom, And A Really Severe Learning Curve, Adam W. Tyma

Communication Faculty Publications

This essay's purpose is primarily to document the creation process of the Bethesda Program After-School Media Literacy program via a curriculum inspired by critical pedagogy (e.g., Freire, Giroux, Warren). Second, it will conduct a theoretical critique of the project, utilizing the experiences of the project advisor (me). Finally, given the first two sections, this essay will offer a discussion of how this project and the pedagogical process could work in the future.


Public Radio Listener Data Analysis: Mass Communication Research Course Student Projects, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz, Michael L. Hilt Jan 2001

Public Radio Listener Data Analysis: Mass Communication Research Course Student Projects, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz, Michael L. Hilt

Communication Faculty Publications

Faculty across the country are becoming increasingly aware of the usefulness of survey data in communication courses (Thorpe, 2000). Perhaps nowhere is this more important than in the quantitatively oriented research skills course (Bolding, 1996), particularly in the development of teaching models (Poindexter, 1998). The purpose of this article is to show how one public radio listener survey was used to instruct undergraduate mass communication students about the research process.


Planning For Technology-Enhanced Learning On Residential Campuses, Thomas D. Skill Aug 1999

Planning For Technology-Enhanced Learning On Residential Campuses, Thomas D. Skill

Communication Faculty Publications

While many institutions are feverishly designing and assembling distance-learning courses for delivery of off-site degree programs, even more are wondering how best to create and execute technology plans for their residential campuses. Planning and implementing a sustainable infrastructure requires a widely shared vision that speaks directly to your mission, plenty or money and strong leadership that ranges from student ranks up through your board of trustees.


Broadcast Newsroom Hiring And Career Preparation, Michael L. Hilt, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz Apr 1996

Broadcast Newsroom Hiring And Career Preparation, Michael L. Hilt, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz

Communication Faculty Publications

Internships have become an integral part of many journalism and broadcasting curricula. More than 95 percent of journalism and broadcasting programs report that internships are a part of their curricula (Becker. 1990; Meeske. 1988b). The industry's mandate that even entry-level employees should have experience in the field (Basow & Byrne. 1993; Parcells. 1985) has led colleges and universities to help place students in internships. The programs offer students an opportunity to grow in the professional environment, while supplementing what has been learned in the classroom.