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Articles 31 - 49 of 49

Full-Text Articles in Education

Career Advice In Australian Secondary Schools: Use And Usefulness, Sheldon Rothman, Kylie Hillman Jan 2010

Career Advice In Australian Secondary Schools: Use And Usefulness, Sheldon Rothman, Kylie Hillman

Dr Sheldon Rothman

This report examines young people’s participation in career advice activities while at school and their perceptions of the usefulness of the advice they receive. The data are from the 2003 15 yearold cohort of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY). Most members of this LSAY Y03 cohort were in Year 10 in 2003. The present report examines how much career advice students accessed in Years 10, 11 and 12 across three years of data collection (2003–2005). A smaller group of the cohort is followed each year; this group was in Year 10 in 2003, Year 11 in ...


Achievement In Literacy And Numeracy By Australian 14 Year-Olds, 1975-1998, Sheldon Rothman Jan 2010

Achievement In Literacy And Numeracy By Australian 14 Year-Olds, 1975-1998, Sheldon Rothman

Dr Sheldon Rothman

This LSAY research report examines student achievement scores on tests of reading comprehension and mathematics from five studies conducted between 1975 and 1998. The data are from five studies involving young people in Australian schools: the Australian Studies in School Performance in 1975, the Australian Studies of Student Performance in 1980, the 1989 Youth in Transition study and the 1995 and 1998 Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth studies. The report examines literacy and numeracy trends for all students and for smaller groups of students, with results reported by gender, language background, socioeconomic status and location. Multivariate analyses examine how influences ...


Influences On Achievement In Literacy And Numeracy, Sheldon Rothman, Julie Mcmillan Jan 2010

Influences On Achievement In Literacy And Numeracy, Sheldon Rothman, Julie Mcmillan

Dr Sheldon Rothman

This report examines the influence of a range of factors on the literacy and numeracy achievement levels of Year 9 students in Australia. The data were obtained from students in the first wave of LSAY and were analysed using hierarchical linear modelling to account for the sample design of LSAY. Modelling procedures followed a theoretical construct, incorporating variables believed to be important influences on achievement in literacy and numeracy. In addition, variables were selected to ensure consistency between cohorts and between literacy and numeracy. Included in the analyses were variables relating to students (gender, Indigenous background, language background, home location ...


Lsay Cohort Report Of 15 Year-Olds In 2003: 17 Year-Olds In 2005, Catherine Underwood, Kylie Hillman, Sheldon Rothman Jan 2010

Lsay Cohort Report Of 15 Year-Olds In 2003: 17 Year-Olds In 2005, Catherine Underwood, Kylie Hillman, Sheldon Rothman

Dr Sheldon Rothman

This report provides details of the experiences of the 2003 cohort of 15 year-olds of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) in 2005. Information on this cohort was first collected in 2003 when these young people participated in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), conducted by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). A follow-up telephone interview that year collected further information on the cohort. The reference period for this report is 2005, when the age of respondents was 17 years. Information about the activities of the 2003 cohort of 15 yearolds in previous years is available ...


Lsay Cohort Report The Year 9 Class Of 1995 In 2001: Education, Employment And Experiences, Sheldon Rothman, Kylie Hillman Jan 2010

Lsay Cohort Report The Year 9 Class Of 1995 In 2001: Education, Employment And Experiences, Sheldon Rothman, Kylie Hillman

Dr Sheldon Rothman

This report provides details of the experiences of the 1995 cohort of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (abbreviated to LSAY Y95). Information on this cohort was first collected in 1995, when these young people were Year 9 students in Australian schools. The reference period for this report is 2001, when the modal age of respondents was 20 years.1 Nearly all of the cohort had completed secondary school, and more than one-half were undertaking some type of study.


Lsay Cohort Report The Year 9 Class Of 1995 In 2000: Experiences In Education And Employment, Sheldon Rothman Jan 2010

Lsay Cohort Report The Year 9 Class Of 1995 In 2000: Experiences In Education And Employment, Sheldon Rothman

Dr Sheldon Rothman

This report provides details of the experiences of the 1995 cohort of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (abbreviated to LSAY Y95) at a single point in time. Information on this cohort was first collected in 1995, when these young people were Year 9 students in Australian schools. The reference period for this report is 2000. Nearly all of the cohort had completed secondary school, and more than half were undertaking some type of study.


Staying Longer At School And Absenteeism: Evidence From Australian Research And The Longitudinal Surveys Of Australian Youth., Sheldon Rothman Jan 2010

Staying Longer At School And Absenteeism: Evidence From Australian Research And The Longitudinal Surveys Of Australian Youth., Sheldon Rothman

Dr Sheldon Rothman

Youth in Transition (YIT), a program of longitudinal surveys conducted by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER), began in 1978. The program was designed to trace national samples of 6 000 young people who were born in 1961 and had participated as 14-year-olds in the Australian Studies in School Performance in 1975 (Keeves & Bourke, 1976). New samples were added in 1981, 1985 and 1989, based on cohorts of young people born in 1965, 1970 and 1975, respectively. Data were collected on each of the first three cohorts until the mid-1990s; data collection from the 1975 birth cohort ended in December 2002. A new cohort was added in 1995, and the program was renamed the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY); a second LSAY cohort was added in 1998. Each of these LSAY cohorts comprised more than ...


The Development And Validation Of Australian Indices Of Child Development—Part I: Conceptualisation And Development, Ann Sanson, Sebastian Misson, Mary Hawkins, Donna Berthelsen Dec 2009

The Development And Validation Of Australian Indices Of Child Development—Part I: Conceptualisation And Development, Ann Sanson, Sebastian Misson, Mary Hawkins, Donna Berthelsen

Dr Sheldon Rothman

The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) is a major national study examining the lives of Australian children, using a cross-sequential cohort design and data from parents, children, and teachers for 5,107 infants (3–19 months) and 4,983 children (4–5 years). Its data are publicly accessible and are used by researchers from many disciplinary backgrounds. It contains multiple measures of children’s developmental outcomes as well as a broad range of information on the contexts of their lives. This paper reports on the development of summary outcome indices of child development using the LSAC data. The indices ...


The Development And Validation Of Australian Indices Of Child Development—Part Ii: Validity Support, Ann Sanson, Mary Hawkins, Sebastian Misson Dec 2009

The Development And Validation Of Australian Indices Of Child Development—Part Ii: Validity Support, Ann Sanson, Mary Hawkins, Sebastian Misson

Dr Sheldon Rothman

The two outcome indices described in a companion paper (Sanson et al., Child Indicators Research, 2009) were developed using data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). These indices, one for infants and the other for 4 year to 5 year old children, were designed to fill the need for parsimonious measures of children’s developmental status to be used in analyses by a broad range of data users and to guide government policy and interventions to support young children’s optimal development. This paper presents evidence from Wave 1data from LSAC to support the validity of these indices ...


Young Australians’ Participation In Vocational Education To Age 24, Sheldon Rothman Sep 2006

Young Australians’ Participation In Vocational Education To Age 24, Sheldon Rothman

Dr Sheldon Rothman

No abstract provided.


Staying Longer At School And Absenteeism : Evidence From Australian Research And The Longitudinal Surveys Of Australian Youth., Sheldon Rothman Feb 2004

Staying Longer At School And Absenteeism : Evidence From Australian Research And The Longitudinal Surveys Of Australian Youth., Sheldon Rothman

Dr Sheldon Rothman

Participation in senior secondary education in Australia has experienced tremendous growth since the late 1960s. Much of this growth has come from young people who were the first in their families to participate in schooling at this level. Many of the changes in participation and in curriculum offerings have been documented as part of a number of longitudinal surveys of young people. This paper summarises some of the knowledge gained from this research, and from research conducted by one state education department over the period.


15 Up : Charting The Influence Of Literacy And Numeracy Achievement On Later Life., Sheldon Rothman Dec 2003

15 Up : Charting The Influence Of Literacy And Numeracy Achievement On Later Life., Sheldon Rothman

Dr Sheldon Rothman

A successful involvement with further education, training and employment can be predicted through a student's performance in literacy and numeracy at secondary school level. The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) is a program that makes it possible to assess the influence of achievements in year 9, combined with the successful completion of year 12, while tracking the progress of students as they move through the education system to the workforce.


Longitudinal Surveys Of Australian Youth, Gary Marks, Sheldon Rothman Nov 2003

Longitudinal Surveys Of Australian Youth, Gary Marks, Sheldon Rothman

Dr Sheldon Rothman

This article provides an overview of the Longitudinal surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) project. It discusses the surveys, samples and data, the survey content, the uses of the data, and how to make use of the data.


Student Absence In South Australian Schools., Sheldon Rothman Mar 2002

Student Absence In South Australian Schools., Sheldon Rothman

Dr Sheldon Rothman

Students who are frequently absent from school ('non-attenders') are considered to be 'at risk'. State education departments have recently begun to improve their collection of student absence data, often to contribute to the development of performance standards for schools. This paper presents a summary of data from the Term 2 collection in South Australian government schools in 1997 and 1999. the data were combined with student information, which allowed examination and comparison of attendance patterns for different groups of students. The author provides details about which students were absent in those years, the frequency of students' absences, which students had ...


School Absence And Student Background Factors : A Multilevel Analysis, Sheldon Rothman Feb 2001

School Absence And Student Background Factors : A Multilevel Analysis, Sheldon Rothman

Dr Sheldon Rothman

As part of regular collections, South Australian government schools provide data on students, including individual student absences during one full term (usually 10 weeks). These data were analysed to understand how student absence is affected by student background and school contexts. A multilevel statistical model of student absence was developed using data collected in 1997, and repeated for 1999. This paper presents the findings for students in primary schools, showing that absence rates for indigenous students, while higher than the rates for non-indigenous students, are affected by school factors such as the concentration of indigenous students in the school and ...


Factors Influencing Assigned Student Achievement Levels Ii : Mathematics, The Arts And Health And Physical Education., Sheldon Rothman Nov 1999

Factors Influencing Assigned Student Achievement Levels Ii : Mathematics, The Arts And Health And Physical Education., Sheldon Rothman

Dr Sheldon Rothman

In 1997 the South Australian Department of Education, Training and Employment collected student achievement data on a sample of students in Years 1-8 in English, Science, Studies of Society and Environment, and Technology, four of the eight national curriculum profiles learning areas. Summaries were reported to teachers in Xpress, the Department's fortnightly newspaper, and at the 1998 Australian Association for Research in Education conference Factors Influencing Assigned Student Achievement Levels. In 1998 the Department completed the collection of profiles data, with information on student achievement in Mathematics, the Arts, Health and Physical Education, and Languages Other Than English. Using ...


Non-Attendance And Student Background Factors., Sheldon Rothman Nov 1999

Non-Attendance And Student Background Factors., Sheldon Rothman

Dr Sheldon Rothman

Regular attendance at school is important for students to achieve social and academic outcomes of schooling. The monitoring of student attendance is seen as a school function, with state education departments collecting only summary school attendance data. Recent developments in information management systems have allowed education departments to collect student level attendance data from schools, offering opportunities for administrators to improve their understanding of the nature of student non- attendance, and providing schools with benchmarks for attendance. In 1997, the South Australian Department of Education, Training and Employment commenced an annual collection of student level non-attendance records for Term 2 ...


A Multilevel Model Of Student Non-Attendance., Sheldon Rothman Nov 1999

A Multilevel Model Of Student Non-Attendance., Sheldon Rothman

Dr Sheldon Rothman

Regular attendance at school is important for students to achieve social and academic outcomes of schooling. Individual school attendance practices vary, which may result in differential student outcomes. The development of multilevel models has allowed researchers to examine relationships between student level and school level variables, and to determine whether the variation in attendance patterns is associated with school level practices. In 1997 and 1998, the South Australian Department of Education, Training and Employment collected student level non-attendance records for Term 2 of each year from 60 percent of schools, accounting for more than 62 percent of students in Reception ...


Factors Influencing Assigned Student Achievement Levels, Sheldon Rothman Oct 1998

Factors Influencing Assigned Student Achievement Levels, Sheldon Rothman

Dr Sheldon Rothman

During 1997, teachers in South Australian government schools were asked to assign a level of achievement using the nationally developed curriculum profiles in English, Science, Studies of Society and Environment, and Technology. About one third of state schools participated. Data were collected on student achievement levels, student background factors (age, gender, school card status, aboriginality, special programs), school background factors (CAP, DSP), and teacher confidence in assigning achievement levels using profiles. This paper presents loglinear models to report on relationships between assigned levels and student background, school background, and teacher confidence; relationships among the strands in each learning area; and ...