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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Education

The Chicano Educational Experience: A Framework For Effective Schools In Chicano Communities, Daniel Solórzano, Ronald Solórzano Aug 1995

The Chicano Educational Experience: A Framework For Effective Schools In Chicano Communities, Daniel Solórzano, Ronald Solórzano

Ronald Solórzano

Explores Chicanos' educational conditions and related outcomes from elementary school through college. Examines the theoretical models used to explain Chicanos' low achievement and educational attainment. Investigates the Effective Schools and Accelerated Schools intervention models and adapts them for use with Chicano students. This research shifts primary responsibility for academic failure to schools' structure, resources, and processes.


Keto Viante South Africa, Wamzjkaooda Wamzjkaooda Mar 1995

Keto Viante South Africa, Wamzjkaooda Wamzjkaooda

wamzjkaooda wamzjkaooda

Keto Viante South Africa improvement as best appeared differently in relation to various sources. What is Keto Viante South Africa? Keto Viante South Africa maintains to be a trademark improvement that covers the craving, affecting the sound weight decrease process. The anticipated usage of the pills empowers individuals to keep running with less eating affinities around night time in view of diminished sustenance longings or craving desires.



Latino Performance In Rural Public Schools: Grades 3,6,12, Refugio Rochin, Steve Hampton, Javier Ekboir Jan 1995

Latino Performance In Rural Public Schools: Grades 3,6,12, Refugio Rochin, Steve Hampton, Javier Ekboir

Refugio I. Rochin

Using multiple regression analysis, we compare non-Latino vs Latino test scores in rural school districts (grades 3,6,12) to determine the "effects" of Latino concentration, English proficiency, socio-economic status and school funding. We find relatively better test results for Latinos as Latino concentration increases. We provide theoretical hypothesis for more study.


On The Horns Of A Dilemma: Accuracy Vs. Brevity In The Use Of Legal Terms By Court Interpreters, Holly Mikkelson Jan 1995

On The Horns Of A Dilemma: Accuracy Vs. Brevity In The Use Of Legal Terms By Court Interpreters, Holly Mikkelson

Holly Mikkelson

No abstract provided.


The Art Of Working With Interpreters: A Manual For Health Care Professionals, Holly Mikkelson Jan 1995

The Art Of Working With Interpreters: A Manual For Health Care Professionals, Holly Mikkelson

Holly Mikkelson

No abstract provided.


The Judgements Of Language-Trained Raters And Doctors In A Test Of English For Health Professionals, Tom Lumley Dec 1994

The Judgements Of Language-Trained Raters And Doctors In A Test Of English For Health Professionals, Tom Lumley

Dr Tom Lumley

Research to date has produced conflicting findings concerning the relative harshness and other characteristics of language- trained raters versus 'naive' native speaker or occupational expert raters. This question is considered in the context of a recent standard- setting project carried out for the Occupational English Test, an occupation specific test of English for overseas- trained health professionals. 20 audio recordings of role plays from recent administrations of the tests were each rated by 10 trained ESL raters and 10 medical practitioners. Broad similarities in judgements indicate reliance on ESL-trained raters can be justified.


Cross-Language Synonyms In The Lexicons Of Bilingual Infants: One Language Or Two?, Barbara Zurer Pearson, Sylvia C. Fernandez, D.Kimbrough Oller Dec 1994

Cross-Language Synonyms In The Lexicons Of Bilingual Infants: One Language Or Two?, Barbara Zurer Pearson, Sylvia C. Fernandez, D.Kimbrough Oller

Barbara Zurer Pearson

This study tests the widely-cited claim from Volterra & Taeschner (1978), which is reinforced by Clark's Principle of Contrast (1987), that young simultaneous bilingual children reject cross-language synonyms in their earliest lexicons. The rejection of translation equivalents is taken by Volterra & Taeschner as support for the idea that the bilingual child possesses a single-language system which includes elements from both languages. We examine first the accuracy of the empirical claim and then its adequacy as support for the argument that bilingual children do not have independent lexical systems in each language. The vocabularies of 27 developing bilinguals were recorded at varying intervals between ages 0;8 and 2;6 using the MacArthur CDI, a standardized parent report form in English and Spanish. The two single-language vocabularies of each bilingual child were compared to determine how many pairs of translation equivalents (TEs) were reported for each child at different stages of development. TEs were observed for all children but one, with an average of 30% of all words coded in the two languages, both at early stages (in vocabularies of 2-12 words) and later (up to 500 words). Thus, Volterra & Taeschner's empirical claim was not upheld. Further ...