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Journal

Internationalization

Bilingual, Multilingual, and Multicultural Education

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Education

An Overlooked Aspect Of Internationalization: Power Blocs And The “Cultural Other” In The Classroom, Ahmad Samarji Jan 2019

An Overlooked Aspect Of Internationalization: Power Blocs And The “Cultural Other” In The Classroom, Ahmad Samarji

Educational Considerations

As teachers, instructors, and educators, we strive to prepare our students to become global citizens and equip them with a degree of intercultural competence, where they can survive within a global economy and an interconnected world. However, we are sometimes too focused on the broader global picture and often overlook an essential component towards internationalization and globalization: the power blocs that exist inside our classroom. This article serves as a commentary to prompt teachers at schools, instructors at universities, and educators to ensure that a major component of our teaching and learning practice should be focused on blurring the boundaries ...


The Role Of Language In Processes Of Internationalization: Considering Linguistic Heterogeneity And Voices From Within And Out In Two Diverse Contexts In Ontario, Julie Byrd Clark, Eve Haque, Sylvie A. Lamoureux Jan 2013

The Role Of Language In Processes Of Internationalization: Considering Linguistic Heterogeneity And Voices From Within And Out In Two Diverse Contexts In Ontario, Julie Byrd Clark, Eve Haque, Sylvie A. Lamoureux

Comparative and International Education / Éducation Comparée et Internationale

This multi-voiced paper considers the role of language and linguistic heterogeneity in relation to larger discourses and processes of internationalization and globalization in Canadian higher education by examining two particular educational contexts in Ontario: newly arrived adult students participating in Immigrant language training programs; and Franco-Ontarian students transitioning to post-secondary schools and gaining access to higher education. The authors argue for a multidimensional conceptual approach to theorizing internationalization; one that takes into account the significance of language from the global, transnational and local levels of the social world whereby linguistic heterogeneity is viewed as the “norm” and one that allows ...