Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 30 of 35

Full-Text Articles in Education

The Rights Stuff: Ethical Decision-Making And Image Use In A Commercial Context, Maureen Burns Ed.D. Jun 2019

The Rights Stuff: Ethical Decision-Making And Image Use In A Commercial Context, Maureen Burns Ed.D.

VRA Bulletin

This article discusses ethical decision-making and image use in a commercial context. The author takes a historical perspective to better understand how the image provider world transitioned from analog to digital and has subsequently changed. Archivision, a commercial business that licenses a research library of 114,000 images of world architecture, urban design, gardens, landscapes, archaeological sites, and art in museums and public places is used as a case study to explore rights issues and better understand the vendor perspective. The author suggests that due to the decrease in image vendors over the last several years, it is worth considering ...


Instant Architecture: Hosted Access To The Archivision Research Library With Built-In Image Management & Presentation Tools, Maureen A. Burns Ed.D., Andreas Knab Oct 2018

Instant Architecture: Hosted Access To The Archivision Research Library With Built-In Image Management & Presentation Tools, Maureen A. Burns Ed.D., Andreas Knab

VRA Bulletin

The Archivision Research Library is a collection of 100,000 digital images of art and architecture professionally photographed by a trained architect. It documents the built environment--from ancient monuments to cutting-edge contemporary constructions--with extensive, standardized descriptive metadata. Archivision is accessible for research and teaching through a web-based application--a dedicated hosted instance of MDID--with vrcHost LLC delivering full services and technical support: installation, integration, and maintenance. This combination provides not only instant access to Archivision, but also to sophisticated tools for managing images using an open source media management system to discover, aggregate, study, and present digital media.


Volume 22 Issue 4 Introduction, Martin Blasco May 2017

Volume 22 Issue 4 Introduction, Martin Blasco

OLA Quarterly

During the 2014 OLA Annual Conference in Salem, a group of librarians met informally for lunch to discuss the idea of creating a chapter of REFORMA (The National Association to Promote Library and Information to Latinos and Spanish Speaking) in Oregon.

In our second meeting at the end of 2014 in the Gresham branch of the Multnomah County Library (MCL), we formalized the creation of the REFORMA Oregon Chapter. By mid-2015, we became a Round Table in OLA. During this short period of time, we have increased in numbers, organized well-attended presentations during OLA conferences, held Mock Pura Belpré Awards ...


Change Is The Only Constant: Serving The Latinx Community With Help From Reforma Oregon, Gabriela Martínez Mercier May 2017

Change Is The Only Constant: Serving The Latinx Community With Help From Reforma Oregon, Gabriela Martínez Mercier

OLA Quarterly

Part of the reason “change is the only constant” is cliché is because it holds true in many different contexts. Libraries are not what they were one hundred years ago. One could argue they are not even what they were fifty years ago. Societies evolve, populations fluctuate, and norms shift. As librarians, we are called to meet the needs of our patrons, though who or what falls under the umbrella term of “patrons” often depends on the library’s mission statement.

For the last few decades, the Latinx community has been seen as flourishing. Even with the recent decline in ...


Las Historias De Latinos En Oregón: Canby, Oregón An Oral History Project Collaboration Between A Librarian And An Archivist, Natalia M. Fernandez May 2017

Las Historias De Latinos En Oregón: Canby, Oregón An Oral History Project Collaboration Between A Librarian And An Archivist, Natalia M. Fernandez

OLA Quarterly

In the spring of 2015, I began the oral history project Latinos en Oregón to document the stories of Oregon’s Latino/a communities. As the curator and archivist of the Oregon Multicultural Archives (OMA) at the Oregon State University (OSU) Special Collections and Archives Research Center, my job is to assist in preserving the histories and sharing the stories that document Oregon’s African American, Asian American, Latino/a, and Native American communities (Oregon Multicultural Archives, 2005). There are gaps in the historical record as it pertains to people of color in Oregon, and the OMA seeks to address ...


Libros For Oregon: Collections Connect Communities A New Lsta Grant To Help More Oregon Libraries Take Advantage Of The Guadalajara Book Fair, Deborah Gitlitz May 2017

Libros For Oregon: Collections Connect Communities A New Lsta Grant To Help More Oregon Libraries Take Advantage Of The Guadalajara Book Fair, Deborah Gitlitz

OLA Quarterly

Acquiring good books in Spanish for our libraries is a perennial challenge. In the fall of 2015, a discussion arose on some Oregon library listservs about the challenge of connecting our patrons with culturally-appropriate, high-quality Spanish books. Author Gitlitz gathered a team to put together an LSTA grant proposal for a project called “Libros for Oregon,” with a goal of increasing access to high-quality Spanish language books for the users of Oregon libraries, particularly smaller, rural libraries.

The project has three parts: (1) form an Oregon library book-buying cooperative (with new participants each year) to purchase materials for members at ...


Impacting Rural Hispanic Communities By Reaching Out, Connecting And Providing Services At Different Levels, Patty Lara May 2017

Impacting Rural Hispanic Communities By Reaching Out, Connecting And Providing Services At Different Levels, Patty Lara

OLA Quarterly

In my role as an outreach specialist, I have created community events, partnered with various organizations, and participated in nontraditional programs in order to attract the vast Hispanic populations in the area to the various Hood River County libraries.

Hood River County is a rural community, and an estimated 31 percent of the population is Hispanic. The great thing about this community is that it has invested its efforts in honoring and accepting the Hispanic culture and bringing the community together as a whole. There is a little town named Odell, about eight miles south of Hood River, where I ...


Reforma Oregon Chapter May 2017

Reforma Oregon Chapter

OLA Quarterly

During the 2014 OLA Annual Conference in Salem, a group of librarians met informally for lunch to discuss the idea of creating a chapter of REFORMA (The National Association to Promote Library and Information to Latinos and Spanish Speaking) in Oregon.

In our second meeting at the end of 2014 in the Gresham branch of the Multnomah County Library (MCL), we formalized the creation of the REFORMA Oregon Chapter. By mid-2015, we became a Round Table in OLA. During this short period of time, we have increased in numbers, organized well-attended presentations during OLA conferences, held Mock Pura Belpré Awards ...


Collection Diversity Has No Borders: A Librarian’S Experience At Fil, Cilelij And Filij, Patricia Morán May 2017

Collection Diversity Has No Borders: A Librarian’S Experience At Fil, Cilelij And Filij, Patricia Morán

OLA Quarterly

Many public libraries in communities where Spanish is a language preferred by a significant percentage of the population have dedicated Spanish language collections and bilingual/ bicultural staff that provides library services and programs. In Oregon, the Latino population is growing faster than the national average, and nearly half of Oregon Latinos are bilingual (Oregon Community Foundation, 2016). In alignment with best practices, and upholding the core values of our profession, libraries dedicate funds and shelving space to Spanish language materials to serve the informational, educational, and recreational needs of Spanish-speaking communities. Libraries that are dedicated to developing and maintaining rich ...


From The Campaign Trail To Your Library: Put Your Library Staff In The Spotlight And Win Library Support, Erica Findley, Kate Lasky Oct 2016

From The Campaign Trail To Your Library: Put Your Library Staff In The Spotlight And Win Library Support, Erica Findley, Kate Lasky

OLA Quarterly

When there is a funding measure on the ballot for a library, a local independent group is formed to run the campaign for the measure. This political group, sometimes called a local ballot committee or political action committee, educates voters on why they need to vote ‘yes’ on the measure to fund the library. This group can include library workers who volunteer their own time to help with the campaign.

In addition to and separate from this, library staff also have an important role during election time to provide voters with information on the measure and what will happen if ...


Endless Images: A Socal Summer Mini-Conference, Maureen Burns, Hannah Marshall, Jenifer Martinez Wormser Oct 2016

Endless Images: A Socal Summer Mini-Conference, Maureen Burns, Hannah Marshall, Jenifer Martinez Wormser

VRA Bulletin

This article reports on the Endless Images mini-conference that took place on August 14 and 15, 2016, in Laguna Beach, California, and provides concise summaries of each presentation. Three professional organizations—the Visual Resources Association (VRA), the Society of California Archivists (SCA), and the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA)—sponsored the event. The goal was to bring together professionals from each of these like-minded organizations to showcase their digital projects and explore the connections in their work. Twenty presentations in two sessions and a lightning round highlight both the challenges and solutions that characterize the current digital ...


Developing A Practicum In Digital Collection Management, Anna Bernhard May 2016

Developing A Practicum In Digital Collection Management, Anna Bernhard

VRA Bulletin

Engaging student workers in digitizing and cataloging image collections can be difficult yet through the development of a practicum course, as described in this case study, students find the work deeply rewarding, which in turn benefits the collection. The following pages will describe how to create a course that better prepares students for careers in the arts and design world by educating students about the role of collection management.


Phonemic Conversion As The Ideal Romanization Scheme For Hebrew: Implications For Hebrew Cataloging, Uzzi Ornan, Rachel Leket-Mor Apr 2016

Phonemic Conversion As The Ideal Romanization Scheme For Hebrew: Implications For Hebrew Cataloging, Uzzi Ornan, Rachel Leket-Mor

Judaica Librarianship

This paper examines a romanization scheme developed by linguist Uzzi Ornan that has not been considered for implementation in libraries. Phonemic conversion of Hebrew neither uses transliteration nor transcription strategies but reconstructs the theoretical structure of the original Hebrew word based on its phonemes. The article describes this scheme and its benefits, which include full coverage of all historical periods and script modes of Hebrew, and full reversibility, complete with an online interface that enables automatic conversion. The article compares the suggested phonemic conversion scheme with the ALA/LC Romanization of Hebrew and provides a history of previously attempted reversal ...


A “Mind-Boggling” Implication: The Hebrew Bible, The Old Testament, And The Definition Of A Work, David Conners Apr 2014

A “Mind-Boggling” Implication: The Hebrew Bible, The Old Testament, And The Definition Of A Work, David Conners

Judaica Librarianship

The uniform title Bible. O.T. has long caused difficulty in Judaica libraries. The well documented problems caused by this heading are reviewed. Alternative models developed by the Hebraica Team of the Library of Congress (LC) are discussed, as is an LC proposed rule change to Resource Description and Access (RDA) that was partially approved by the Joint Steering Committee. The idea by members of the Association of Jewish Libraries to use the Virtual International Authority File as a technical solution is reviewed briefly. The author endorses a model from LC that uses different uniform titles for the Hebrew Bible ...


The National Library Of Israel And Oclc, Elhanan Adler, Marina Goldsmith Dec 2011

The National Library Of Israel And Oclc, Elhanan Adler, Marina Goldsmith

Judaica Librarianship

OCLC published the following announcement in December 2008: “The National Library of Israel and OCLC have completed a pilot project that has resulted in the addition of more than 788,000 new bibliographic records and 1.1 million holdings from the national library to WorldCat.”The successful completion of this project was the result of a number of policy decisions and technological developments on the part of both parties. This article describes the motivation, history, and challenges of this project.


Frontlog Cataloging: Using In-Process Records To Reveal Backlogged Collections, Jasmin Nof Dec 2011

Frontlog Cataloging: Using In-Process Records To Reveal Backlogged Collections, Jasmin Nof

Judaica Librarianship

The University of Maryland Libraries have acquired tens of thousands of Judaica volumes during the past decades and continuing to the present. The growth has far exceeded cataloging capacity, resulting in a significant backlog that is invisible to selectors and patrons alike. In order to make these materials available, catalogers at UM Libraries developed procedures that make use of in-process records. These processes have since been applied to other backlogs. This paper describes the procedures and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. Overall, the frontlog approach has resulted in visible benefits to both patrons and librarians.


The Changing Terms In Sears, Sara Rofofsky Marcus Dec 2011

The Changing Terms In Sears, Sara Rofofsky Marcus

Judaica Librarianship

Librarians are considered the keepers of knowledge. However, the very method in which this knowledge is kept can cause confusion, not only for patrons seeking the knowledge held, but also for librarians unfamiliar with methods used in classifying books. Changing terms, or terms that do not change and thus portray what today could be considered bias or prejudice, cause confusion or even embarrassment in searching the vast knowledge base available. Librarians are known for organizational work, particularly catalogers who organize knowledge in the library into a seemingly accessible order. This article focuses on selected concepts of importance to the Judaic ...


The Changing Landscape Of Hebraica Cataloging, Daniel Lovins Dec 2008

The Changing Landscape Of Hebraica Cataloging, Daniel Lovins

Judaica Librarianship

Hebraica catalogers, like other librarians, are witnessing a major shift in their profession. Catalog records for physical objects in the library are increasingly giving way to metadata for digital objects on the web. The RLG Union Catalog, a mainstay of Hebraica cataloging since 1988, has been absorbed into OCLC's WorldCat. Rapid advances in information technology are driving the development of a new international cataloging code, the introduction of multiple languages and scripts in online authority records, and the emergence of a "Virtual International Authority File." While these changes are redefining the kind of work Hebraica catalogers are engaged in ...


The Making Of A Classification Scheme For Libraries Of Judaica, David Elazar Dec 2008

The Making Of A Classification Scheme For Libraries Of Judaica, David Elazar

Judaica Librarianship

This paper describes the history of A Classification System for Libraries of Judaica, its development, the process involved in preparing the second and third revisions, and its use in various libraries.The authors of the scheme contend that there was—and is—a need for a classification system for libraries of Judaica to classify and arrange their collections according to Jewish concepts based upon Jewish thought and terminology.


Johann Heinrich Hottinger And The Systematic Organization Of Jewish Literature, Seth Jerchower, Heidi G. Lerner Dec 2007

Johann Heinrich Hottinger And The Systematic Organization Of Jewish Literature, Seth Jerchower, Heidi G. Lerner

Judaica Librarianship

The authors explore the influence of the Swiss theologian, Orientalist, and Christian Hebraist, Johann Heinrich Hottinger, who preceded Shabbetai Bass in developing and implementing a classified Hebraica-Judaica bibliography. His ideas and theories have heretofore not been closely examined by Judaica bibliographers or researchers of Jewish intellectual history. Hottinger’s innovation was his degree of abstraction: that of analyzing a collection according to its contents. A study of his theories and classification systems can stimulate and encourage a renewed look at early practices and offer insights that can be relevant to current research. Unless otherwise noted, translations from the original Latin ...


To The Editor, Bella Hass Weinberg Jan 2003

To The Editor, Bella Hass Weinberg

Judaica Librarianship

No abstract provided.


Cataloguing The Cairo Genizah, Robert Brody May 2000

Cataloguing The Cairo Genizah, Robert Brody

Judaica Librarianship

The Cairo Genizah collections are an extraordinarily important resource for many fields of Jewish Studies. Some of the difficulties confronted by scholars in exploiting these materials are described, and the importance of producing a series of reliable catalogues of the various collections is emphasized.


Selected Topics On Hebraica Cataloging From The Heb-Naco Listserv, Caroline G. Holt, Joan Biella May 2000

Selected Topics On Hebraica Cataloging From The Heb-Naco Listserv, Caroline G. Holt, Joan Biella

Judaica Librarianship

The Hebrew NACO (Name Authority Cooperative Program) Funnel Project, which began in October 1994, was the catalyst for creating the HebNACO listserv. Although the listserv was specifically designed to cover only Hebraic authority issues, it functions as a discussion group for all issues pertaining to Hebraica cataloging.


Library Of Congress Subject Headings In Jewish Studies: Recent Changes (1994–1995), Joseph Galron-Goldschliiger Dec 1995

Library Of Congress Subject Headings In Jewish Studies: Recent Changes (1994–1995), Joseph Galron-Goldschliiger

Judaica Librarianship

The following subject headings of interest to Judaica and Hebraica librarians were culled from Library of Congress Weekly Lists (1994) nos. 6-52 (Feb. 9, 1994–December 28, 1994), and (1995) nos. 1–36 (January 4, 1995-September 6, 1995). This list continues my earlier one, published in Judaica Librarianship, vol. 8, no. 1–2 (Spring 1993–Winter 1994), pp. 73–82. The list is also an update of my 4th edition of Library of Congress Subject Headings in Jewish Studies (New York: Association of Jewish Libraries, 1993).


Current Practices And Standards Of Cataloging Hebraica In Rlin, Heidi G. Lerner Sep 1994

Current Practices And Standards Of Cataloging Hebraica In Rlin, Heidi G. Lerner

Judaica Librarianship

Since 1988, approximately 21 institutions have input Hebraica records into RLIN utilizing its Hebrew script capability. These institutions have varying standards for the amount of Hebrew script and Romanization that they provide. Some institutions provide vernacular access only for the core fields that have been defined by RLIN; others provide vernacular access for main and ad d ed entries, notes, and subject headings as well. Some institutions do not provide Romanization for the statement of responsibility or beyond the title proper. These institutions have varying financial, technical, and policy constraints that have contributed to this diversity of procedures for inputting ...


Modifications Made By The New York Public Library To Rlin Hebraica Records, Claire Dienstag Sep 1994

Modifications Made By The New York Public Library To Rlin Hebraica Records, Claire Dienstag

Judaica Librarianship

In its Hebraica cataloging on RLIN, the Jewish Division of the New York Public Library aims for a complete "9114" cataloging category (CC) record, as specified by the Research Libraries Group. Derived records with a CC value of "9994", signifying a lower level of cataloging quality, are enhanced by romanizing field 245 #b, i.e., "other title" information. Field 245 #c (statement of responsibility) can remain unromanized, for the author's name in Latin characters appears in field 1 xx (main entry). Complete collation, appropriate subject headings, added entries and notes deemed necessary to describe a book's contents are ...


Hebrew Card Production From Rlin Records At The Klau Library, Laurel S. Wolfson Sep 1994

Hebrew Card Production From Rlin Records At The Klau Library, Laurel S. Wolfson

Judaica Librarianship

While the RUN bibliographic utility fully supports display and search capabilities of Hebrew script in bibliographic records, its card program is not able to produce cards that include Hebrew script. Hebrew Union College Library commissioned the writing of software to utilize existing RLIN functions to download Hebrew script records for local card production. However, modifications of the records are required to accommodate the idiosyncrasies of both RLIN and the local software.


Anomalies In Rlin Hebraica Records: Reflections Of A Recent Arrival On The Cataloging Scene, Clifford B. Miller Sep 1994

Anomalies In Rlin Hebraica Records: Reflections Of A Recent Arrival On The Cataloging Scene, Clifford B. Miller

Judaica Librarianship

Hebraica records on the Research Libraries Information Network feature many inconsistencies in romanization, descriptive cataloging, and form of heading. The categories of inconsistency are outlined, and examples of the variations found on RLIN are provided and discussed from the perspective of a novice cataloger. Classic Hebrew grammar and Biblical sources are often cited as authorities for the correct forms, which may not be found in Library of Congress records. Local policies of the Jewish Theological Seminary regarding name and subject headings for Judaica are included.


Hebraic Authorities: A Historical-Theoretical Perspective, Bella Hass Weinberg Sep 1994

Hebraic Authorities: A Historical-Theoretical Perspective, Bella Hass Weinberg

Judaica Librarianship

The standardization of Hebrew names in cataloging and bibliography has its roots in the Anglo-American tradition of Romanized author main entry. Cross-references from Hebrew names to their Roman equivalents are found in some British Hebraica catalogs published in the 19th century. In the Hebrew bibliographic tradition, in contrast, title main entry predominated and, given the nondistinctiveness of Jewish names, author access was rarely provided. Israeli librarians adopted the Western tradition of author main entry while retaining their commitment to original-alphabet cataloging; their Hebraic authority work consisted primarily of standardization of Hebrew orthography.

The Hebraic capability of the Research Libraries ...


Hebraica Authority Control At Brandeis, Rosalie E. Katchen Sep 1994

Hebraica Authority Control At Brandeis, Rosalie E. Katchen

Judaica Librarianship

Brandeis University Libraries has maintained separate authority files for all names written on title pages in Hebraic script-for personal, corporate, place, and conference headings. The files enable the cataloger to search in roman or Hebraic script. This paper reviews the history of the Hebraica authority files, their organization, changes in usage, adaptation to AACR2, and their reactivation when Hebrew script became available on RLIN. Current usage is examined in light of RLIN and the accommodation of nonroman scripts in the USMARC authorities format.