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Journal

Essays in Education

No Child Left Behind

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Full-Text Articles in Education

Teacher Research Informing Policy: An Analysis Of Research On Highly Qualified Teaching And Nclb, Audrey Amrein-Beardsley Jul 2006

Teacher Research Informing Policy: An Analysis Of Research On Highly Qualified Teaching And Nclb, Audrey Amrein-Beardsley

Essays in Education

One stipulation of President Bush’s No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act is that every classroom in America will be instructed by a highly qualified teacher. To date, however, no one has satisfactorily captured what it means to be highly qualified. Common sense tells us that America’s best teachers are smart about the content areas they teach and how they teach students, but what other factors have helped to define highly qualified teachers within NCLB? The purpose of this inquiry is to investigate how the definition of a highly qualified teacher written into NCLB captures what researchers know about ...


In Response To Nclb: A Case For Retaining The Social Studies, Thomas Misco Sep 2005

In Response To Nclb: A Case For Retaining The Social Studies, Thomas Misco

Essays in Education

The proliferation of state standards, high-stakes accountability, and mandates stemming from the No Child Left Behind Act have worked to sever social studies from the common experience in many schools and has prompted a myopic interest in low-level declarative knowledge. This paper examines the consequences of NCLB for social studies education and provides a defense through the lenses of the learner, the subject matter, and the values of society, as well as a rationale for entrenching and strengthening the social studies given this formidable challenge.


How Will No Child Left Behind Improve Student Achievement? The Necessity Of Classroom-Based Research In Accountability Reform., Stephanie W. Cawthon Sep 2004

How Will No Child Left Behind Improve Student Achievement? The Necessity Of Classroom-Based Research In Accountability Reform., Stephanie W. Cawthon

Essays in Education

No Child Left Behind (2001) legislation emphasizes the use of large-scale assessments in evaluating student proficiency in core academic areas. Classroom-based measures of proficiency, such as research projects, classroom assessments, and homework assignments, also provide rich data regarding students’ academic progress. This article articulates three areas where classroom-based measures can complement the large-scale assessment data used in NCLB reports of school, district and state progress: 1) Alignment of curriculum to state standards, 2) Assessment of student achievement, and 3) Identifying strategies for teaching in a diverse classroom. Making links between classroom instruction, student work, and large-scale assessment will be critical ...