Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Journal

Association of Jewish Libraries

1994

Holocaust literature for young adults

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

Generations Sharing The Holocaust Experience, Esther Hautzig Sep 1994

Generations Sharing The Holocaust Experience, Esther Hautzig

Judaica Librarianship

The author's feelings and experiences in sharing the Holocaust with her own children and the children she addresses regularly in schools are discussed in this paper. From her talks and exchanges with young people, it has been the author's experience that stories of how we lived, not perished, make the greatest impact on young and old listeners. Unless we know the people's lives and what the Jewish people, as well as society at large, lost through the deaths of countless brilliant, educated, compassionate people, as well as children whose futures will always remain unknown and unrealized, we ...


Kindertransport: A Happy Ending?, Olga Levy Drucker Sep 1994

Kindertransport: A Happy Ending?, Olga Levy Drucker

Judaica Librarianship

In early 1939, at age eleven, the author was sent from her native Stuttgart, Germany, on a Children's Transport to England, where she remained for the next six years, living with strangers. Kindertransport, her autobiography, was conceived as a book for young adults at the 50th reunion in London in June 1989. This paper deals with historical as well as emotional aspects of this part of the Holocaust. It points out the existence of intolerance in today's world, and asks whether a repetition of the atrocities of the thirties and forties can be prevented, both in our time ...


Literary Commentary: A Transactional Approach To Holocaust Literature, Karen Shawn Sep 1994

Literary Commentary: A Transactional Approach To Holocaust Literature, Karen Shawn

Judaica Librarianship

Through active reading strategies including annotation, shared inquiry, and interpretive discussion, librarians can play a major role in the development of age-appropriate Holocaust literature programs suitable for library and classroom settings. Literary response theory becomes practice as librarians and students, in this updated adaptation of the chavruta, use writing journals to articulate and exchange questions, comments, and feelings about the books they have read and recommended, bridging the gap between the generations of readers who share, through literature, the Holocaust experience.