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Cataloging Heresy: Challenging The Standard Bibliographic Product, Proceedings Of The Congress For Librarians, 1991, With Additional Contributed Papers. Edited By Bella Hass Weinberg. Medford, Nj: Learned Information, 1992. Xii, 217 P., $35., Pamela R. Gillespie Sep 1994

Cataloging Heresy: Challenging The Standard Bibliographic Product, Proceedings Of The Congress For Librarians, 1991, With Additional Contributed Papers. Edited By Bella Hass Weinberg. Medford, Nj: Learned Information, 1992. Xii, 217 P., $35., Pamela R. Gillespie

Judaica Librarianship

Can a single set of centrally supplied descriptive access points, subject headings, and classification numbers meet the needs of all types of library users? Cataloging Heresy, the expanded proceedings of the 1991 Congress for Librarians held at St. John's University, addresses the issue of shared, homogeneous cataloging from the viewpoints of professionals in various library and information technology settings. This review discusses the papers presented from the perspective of their implications for access to and description of Judaica materials.


Current Practices And Standards Of Cataloging Hebraica In Rlin, Heidi G. Lerner Sep 1994

Current Practices And Standards Of Cataloging Hebraica In Rlin, Heidi G. Lerner

Judaica Librarianship

Since 1988, approximately 21 institutions have input Hebraica records into RLIN utilizing its Hebrew script capability. These institutions have varying standards for the amount of Hebrew script and Romanization that they provide. Some institutions provide vernacular access only for the core fields that have been defined by RLIN; others provide vernacular access for main and ad d ed entries, notes, and subject headings as well. Some institutions do not provide Romanization for the statement of responsibility or beyond the title proper. These institutions have varying financial, technical, and policy constraints that have contributed to this diversity of procedures for inputting ...


Anomalies In Rlin Hebraica Records: Reflections Of A Recent Arrival On The Cataloging Scene, Clifford B. Miller Sep 1994

Anomalies In Rlin Hebraica Records: Reflections Of A Recent Arrival On The Cataloging Scene, Clifford B. Miller

Judaica Librarianship

Hebraica records on the Research Libraries Information Network feature many inconsistencies in romanization, descriptive cataloging, and form of heading. The categories of inconsistency are outlined, and examples of the variations found on RLIN are provided and discussed from the perspective of a novice cataloger. Classic Hebrew grammar and Biblical sources are often cited as authorities for the correct forms, which may not be found in Library of Congress records. Local policies of the Jewish Theological Seminary regarding name and subject headings for Judaica are included.


Hebraic Authorities: A Historical-Theoretical Perspective, Bella Hass Weinberg Sep 1994

Hebraic Authorities: A Historical-Theoretical Perspective, Bella Hass Weinberg

Judaica Librarianship

The standardization of Hebrew names in cataloging and bibliography has its roots in the Anglo-American tradition of Romanized author main entry. Cross-references from Hebrew names to their Roman equivalents are found in some British Hebraica catalogs published in the 19th century. In the Hebrew bibliographic tradition, in contrast, title main entry predominated and, given the nondistinctiveness of Jewish names, author access was rarely provided. Israeli librarians adopted the Western tradition of author main entry while retaining their commitment to original-alphabet cataloging; their Hebraic authority work consisted primarily of standardization of Hebrew orthography.

The Hebraic capability of the Research Libraries ...


Hebraica Authority Control At Brandeis, Rosalie E. Katchen Sep 1994

Hebraica Authority Control At Brandeis, Rosalie E. Katchen

Judaica Librarianship

Brandeis University Libraries has maintained separate authority files for all names written on title pages in Hebraic script-for personal, corporate, place, and conference headings. The files enable the cataloger to search in roman or Hebraic script. This paper reviews the history of the Hebraica authority files, their organization, changes in usage, adaptation to AACR2, and their reactivation when Hebrew script became available on RLIN. Current usage is examined in light of RLIN and the accommodation of nonroman scripts in the USMARC authorities format.


Library Of Congress Classification For Judaica: Recent Changes (1992–1993), Ricky Dreyfuss Sep 1994

Library Of Congress Classification For Judaica: Recent Changes (1992–1993), Ricky Dreyfuss

Judaica Librarianship

The column covers the additions and changes to the Library of Congress classification made from July 1992 to March 1993 in the classes of major importance to Judaica libraries. Recorded here are the usual cutter additions and changes to various topics under class BM (Judaism) and its tables, as well as classes BS (Bible), DS (History) and PJ (Language and Literature). Other classes (i.e., B, BJ, DD, F, HE, PN, RC) that had changes pertaining to Judaica during this period are also included. The article notes several cutter additions under class number DS 135 (History of Jews outside of ...


Library Of Congress Subject Headings In Jewish Studies: Recent Changes (1992–1994), Joseph Galron-Goldschlager Sep 1994

Library Of Congress Subject Headings In Jewish Studies: Recent Changes (1992–1994), Joseph Galron-Goldschlager

Judaica Librarianship

The following subject headings of interest to Judaica and Hebraica librarians were culled from Library of Congress Weekly Lists nos. 21–51 (1992) (May 20, 1992–December 16, 1992), 1–51 (1993) (December 30, 1992–December 15, 1993), and 1–5 (1994) (January 5, 1994–February 2, 1994).

This list continues my earlier one, published in Judaica Librarianship, vol. 7, no. 1–2 (Spring 1992–Winter 1993), pp. 72–78. This list is also an update of my 4th edition of Library of Congress Subject Headings in Jewish Studies (New York: Association of Jewish Libraries, 1993).

The term "Jewish Studies ...


Use Or Non-Use Of Parallel Linking Fields In Rlin For Hebrew-Script Access Points, Rosalie E. Katchen Sep 1994

Use Or Non-Use Of Parallel Linking Fields In Rlin For Hebrew-Script Access Points, Rosalie E. Katchen

Judaica Librarianship

RLIN tagging practice for Hebraic headings is examined in light of cataloging time and efficiency. It is argued that the rule that the roman heading must be a systematic romanization of the Hebrew heading in order for the two to be linked as parallel is inappropriate.


The Rlin Cataloging Category (Cc) Code And Hebraica Cataloging At Yeshiva University Library, Rebecca Malamud Sep 1994

The Rlin Cataloging Category (Cc) Code And Hebraica Cataloging At Yeshiva University Library, Rebecca Malamud

Judaica Librarianship

In doing Hebraica cataloging on RLIN, Yeshiva University (YU) librarians provide full title and statement of responsibility data in the original script. YU catalogers do not, however, provide full romanization of these elements, but stop after the title proper. The Research Libraries Group's definition of cataloging levels requires YU to code its records as less-than-full. It is argued in this paper that the Cataloging Category codes mask the quality of records containing complete bibliographic data in the original script, and that libraries in putting this data are penalized financially.


Contributing Hebrew Name Headings To Naco: A Participant's View, Rachel Simon Sep 1994

Contributing Hebrew Name Headings To Naco: A Participant's View, Rachel Simon

Judaica Librarianship

Princeton University Libraries have undergone several phases over the years regarding authority work. This paper focuses on Princeton's treatment of Hebrew name headings within the framework of authority work in general, prior to and following the library's involvement in the NACO (National Coordinated Cataloging Operations) project.

The paper deals with the following topics: the methods used at Princeton for authority work before the involvement with NACO in 1980; the stages of Princeton's involvement with NACO after 1980 (including production data); procedures developed at Princeton to facilitate authority work, enhance efficiency, and guarantee quality control in all production ...