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Vol. 16/17 Front Matter Dec 2011

Vol. 16/17 Front Matter

Judaica Librarianship

No abstract provided.


The National Library Of Israel And Oclc, Elhanan Adler, Marina Goldsmith Dec 2011

The National Library Of Israel And Oclc, Elhanan Adler, Marina Goldsmith

Judaica Librarianship

OCLC published the following announcement in December 2008: “The National Library of Israel and OCLC have completed a pilot project that has resulted in the addition of more than 788,000 new bibliographic records and 1.1 million holdings from the national library to WorldCat.”The successful completion of this project was the result of a number of policy decisions and technological developments on the part of both parties. This article describes the motivation, history, and challenges of this project.


Cookbooks: Preserving Jewish Tradition, Daniel E. Feinberg, Alice Crosetto Dec 2011

Cookbooks: Preserving Jewish Tradition, Daniel E. Feinberg, Alice Crosetto

Judaica Librarianship

Culinary traditions have played an integral role in the Jewish religion from its very beginning. Families have continually passed down these traditions from one generation to the next as a means to preserve Jewish culture as well as to maintain their Jewish identity. The authors propose that one of the methods of preserving and transmitting these culinary traditions, traditions clearly rooted in oral tradition, has been through the cookbook. While the written cookbook continues to be popular and marketable, traditional cookbook contents are becoming increasingly available online. In saving recipes for future generations, cookbooks preserve religious, cultural, and traditional elements ...


Rabbinics In The New Encyclopaedia Judaica, Eliezer Diamond Dec 2011

Rabbinics In The New Encyclopaedia Judaica, Eliezer Diamond

Judaica Librarianship

There have been significant advances in almost every branch of rabbinic scholarship since the publication of the first edition of Encyclopaedia Judaica (hereafter: EJ1). It was the task of the contributors to Encyclopaedia Judaica’s second edition (hereafter: EJ2) to summarize these advances in a concise yet comprehensive fashion. My role as reviewer is to highlight the advances mentioned in EJ2, to supplement each entry with scholarship that was not mentioned, and, on occasion, critique the style and/or substance of an entry. The latter is done with the full knowledge that it is no easy task to write an ...


Vol. 16/17 Table Of Contents Dec 2011

Vol. 16/17 Table Of Contents

Judaica Librarianship

Judaica Librarianship 16/17 (2011) Table of Contents.


Vol. 16/17 Editor's Note, Zachary M. Baker Dec 2011

Vol. 16/17 Editor's Note, Zachary M. Baker

Judaica Librarianship

Judaica Librarianship 16/17 (2011) editorial.


Isaac Edward Kiev: Early Leader In American Judaica Librarianship, Amy Stempler Dec 2011

Isaac Edward Kiev: Early Leader In American Judaica Librarianship, Amy Stempler

Judaica Librarianship

Isaac Edward Kiev (1905–1975), former Chief Librarian of New York’s Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, spent a lifetime facilitating Jewish research. This article, based on the author’s Master’s thesis on Kiev, focuses on his contributions to the founding of Jewish book and library organizations during the American post-war era, including the Association of Jewish Libraries, Jewish Book Council of America, Jewish Cultural Reconstruction, Inc., and numerous Jewish book foundations in the United States and Israel. In addition to providing insight into the creation of these associations, the article illustrates the parallel development of the fields ...


Israpulp: The Israeli Popular Literature Collection At Arizona State University, Rachel Leket-Mor Dec 2011

Israpulp: The Israeli Popular Literature Collection At Arizona State University, Rachel Leket-Mor

Judaica Librarianship

Based on research literature, the article reviews the history of Hebrew popular literature since the 1930s, its connections with Yiddish Schund literature and its effects on the development of Modern Hebrew literature and Israeli identity, especially in light the New Hebrew ethos. The article features the research collection of Hebrew pulps at Arizona State Univeristy, demonstrates the significance of collecting popular materials in research libraries, and suggests possible new study directions. An appendix lists some of the materials available at the IsraPulp Collection.


Frontlog Cataloging: Using In-Process Records To Reveal Backlogged Collections, Jasmin Nof Dec 2011

Frontlog Cataloging: Using In-Process Records To Reveal Backlogged Collections, Jasmin Nof

Judaica Librarianship

The University of Maryland Libraries have acquired tens of thousands of Judaica volumes during the past decades and continuing to the present. The growth has far exceeded cataloging capacity, resulting in a significant backlog that is invisible to selectors and patrons alike. In order to make these materials available, catalogers at UM Libraries developed procedures that make use of in-process records. These processes have since been applied to other backlogs. This paper describes the procedures and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. Overall, the frontlog approach has resulted in visible benefits to both patrons and librarians.


The Changing Terms In Sears, Sara Rofofsky Marcus Dec 2011

The Changing Terms In Sears, Sara Rofofsky Marcus

Judaica Librarianship

Librarians are considered the keepers of knowledge. However, the very method in which this knowledge is kept can cause confusion, not only for patrons seeking the knowledge held, but also for librarians unfamiliar with methods used in classifying books. Changing terms, or terms that do not change and thus portray what today could be considered bias or prejudice, cause confusion or even embarrassment in searching the vast knowledge base available. Librarians are known for organizational work, particularly catalogers who organize knowledge in the library into a seemingly accessible order. This article focuses on selected concepts of importance to the Judaic ...


Nahum Stutchkoff's Yiddish Play And Radio Scripts In The Dorot Jewish Division, New York Public Library, Amanda (Miryem-Khaye) Seigel Dec 2011

Nahum Stutchkoff's Yiddish Play And Radio Scripts In The Dorot Jewish Division, New York Public Library, Amanda (Miryem-Khaye) Seigel

Judaica Librarianship

The Nahum Stutchkoff collection in the Dorot Jewish Division of The New York Public Library contains Yiddish translations, plays, song lyrics, and radio programs created by Yiddish linguist and playwright Nahum Stutchkoff (1893–1965). This article describes the collection in the context of the Jewish Division’s holdings, using bibliographic details about his known works to trace Stutchkoff’s career as a Yiddish actor, translator, director, playwright, and linguist. Stutchkoff’s radio scripts in particular provide rare documentation of the golden era of Yiddish radio explored by Henry Sapoznik and Ari Y. Kelman. A detailed bibliography of Stutchkoff’s published ...


Encyclopedia Interrupta, Or Gale’S Unfinished: The Scandal Of The Ej2, Barry D. Walfish Dec 2011

Encyclopedia Interrupta, Or Gale’S Unfinished: The Scandal Of The Ej2, Barry D. Walfish

Judaica Librarianship

Encyclopedias are important reference works. They are meant to summarize the state of knowledge in any given field and convey it to both the layperson and the scholar in a clear, concise manner. For Jews and Judaism, the first major effort in this regard was the Jewish Encyclopedia of 1906, which drew upon the knowledge of a cadre of European and American scholars of the Science of Judaism (Wissenschaft des Judentums). Its successor the German Encyclopaedia Judaica began to appear in 1929 but was interrupted in 1934 by the rise of Nazism. It had only reached the end of the ...


The Contribution Of Hebrew Printing Houses And Printers In Istanbul To Ladino Culture And Scholarship, Rachel Simon Dec 2011

The Contribution Of Hebrew Printing Houses And Printers In Istanbul To Ladino Culture And Scholarship, Rachel Simon

Judaica Librarianship

Sephardi printers were pioneers of moveable type in the Islamic world, establishing a Hebrew printing house in Istanbul in 1493. Initially emphasizing classical religious works in Hebrew, since the eighteenth century printers have been instrumental in the development of scholarship, literature, and journalism in the vernacular of most Jews of the western Ottoman Empire: Ladino. Although most Jewish males knew the Hebrew alphabet, they did not understand Hebrew texts. Communal cultural leaders and printers collaborated in order to bring basic Jewish works to the masses in the only language they really knew. While some books in Ladino were printed as ...