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Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Journal

Educational Methods

2015

Art education

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Education

The Peter London Papers, Aaron Darisaw Nov 2015

The Peter London Papers, Aaron Darisaw

Artizein: Arts and Teaching Journal

No abstract provided.


Art Therapy In Educational Settings: A Confluence Of Practices, Nicole M. Gnezda Ph.D. Nov 2015

Art Therapy In Educational Settings: A Confluence Of Practices, Nicole M. Gnezda Ph.D.

Artizein: Arts and Teaching Journal

Art educators solicit a range of images from students. Art therapists help clients respond to the images they create in ways that promote self-understanding and personal growth. This article describes two settings where art therapy perspectives have been integrated with art education practices in order to help students identify underlying issues impacting their education and well-being. As a result of information that arises in art therapy oriented art education programs, students can be offered guidance and directed to interventions that help them grow past their pain and self-defeating behaviors.


Socially Engaged Art Education Beyond The Classroom: Napping, Dreaming And Art Making, Barbara Bickel Nov 2015

Socially Engaged Art Education Beyond The Classroom: Napping, Dreaming And Art Making, Barbara Bickel

Artizein: Arts and Teaching Journal

Article and video offer a socially engaged art project as an example of dynamic lived curriculum. Through what the Gestare Art Collective call a Nap-In students , faculty and the community encounter and engage the unusual experience of communal napping, social dreaming and art making.


Other-Than-Ego Consciousness: Approaching The “Spiritual” In Secular Art Education, Nico Roenpagel Nov 2015

Other-Than-Ego Consciousness: Approaching The “Spiritual” In Secular Art Education, Nico Roenpagel

Artizein: Arts and Teaching Journal

Alternative worldviews bring forth alternative visions of education. This article sheds light on one contemporary approach to a spiritual worldview and its implications for secular art education. It proposes that high school visual art is a particularly conducive environment to engaging teenagers with existential and spiritual questions. An approach to spirituality grounded in a worldview of “profound interconnectedness” and “other-than-ego consciousness,” rather than religious systems, offers a timely basis for renegotiating the spiritual in secular art education settings. Through five concepts, the article bridges broader discussions on spirituality with concrete learning and teaching in the art classroom. For example, it ...


Inverse Inclusion: A Model For Preservice Art Teacher Training, Angela M. La Porte Nov 2015

Inverse Inclusion: A Model For Preservice Art Teacher Training, Angela M. La Porte

Artizein: Arts and Teaching Journal

A university community-based intercession course offers preservice art teachers a unique opportunity to experience inverse inclusion in an art class for special needs adults. Inverse inclusion allows preservice teachers to become students working side-by-side with an equal or greater number of special needs learners, and also places them in occasional roles as teacher, teacher’s assistant, and videographer. Their observations and interactions within these roles provide preservice teachers with perceptive insights and perspectives about teaching, and nurture a better understanding of special needs students’ personal interests and abilities. Applying, reflecting upon, and adapting open-ended art curriculum theory and practice from ...


Misunderstandings And Consequences Of Labeling Artists As Self-Taught, Kristin Congdon Nov 2015

Misunderstandings And Consequences Of Labeling Artists As Self-Taught, Kristin Congdon

Artizein: Arts and Teaching Journal

I have championed artists who have been invisible and underrepresented for decades. Sometimes these artists have been labeled by race or ethnicity and many of them have fallen into the categories of folk and self-taught. When writing about artists who have fallen into one of these categories, I have often tried to avoid labeling them, hoping to have them viewed simply (and complexly) as artists worthy of (high) art consideration. However, I have found that sometimes labeling has been necessary and even useful. Labeling helps a writer, curator, scholar, educator, or arts facilitator focus on a particular cultural group, worldview ...