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Full-Text Articles in Education

An Investigation Of Entry Level Doctor Of Physical Therapy Student Perspectives Of Peer Evaluation, Dawn James, Natalie Weeks-O'Neal, Jennyfer Oh, Teressa Brown Mar 2019

An Investigation Of Entry Level Doctor Of Physical Therapy Student Perspectives Of Peer Evaluation, Dawn James, Natalie Weeks-O'Neal, Jennyfer Oh, Teressa Brown

Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice

Purpose: To describe the perceptions of peer evaluation as an instructional method when used by entry-level doctor of physical therapy (DPT) students as preparation for practical examinations within a clinically oriented course.

Methods/Description: Forty first year, entry-level doctor of physical therapy students participated in structured peer-skills checks prior to practical exams as part a clinically based course. Each student was required to observe and provide critical feedback for at least four other students as they performed simulated patient care activities. Peer-evaluators rated the students on their level of competency with the skills using a Visual Analog Scale and provided ...


Student And Faculty Perceptions Of Live Synchronous Distance Education For Allied Health Students Following Program Expansion To A Rural Campus, Betsy J. Becker, Kelsey Rutt, Allyson Huntley, Harlan Sayles, Kim Michael Oct 2018

Student And Faculty Perceptions Of Live Synchronous Distance Education For Allied Health Students Following Program Expansion To A Rural Campus, Betsy J. Becker, Kelsey Rutt, Allyson Huntley, Harlan Sayles, Kim Michael

Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice

Background & Purpose: Distance education (DE) is a means to meet allied health workforce needs in rural locations where healthcare worker shortages are apparent. Five allied health programs were expanded to a rural campus teaching synchronously using distance education technology. The purpose of this convergent parallel mixed methods study was to explore perceptions of allied health students and faculty at two campus locations.

Methods: Quantitative and qualitative information were collected through a survey of students and faculty (physical therapy, physician assistant, and medical imaging [diagnostic medical sonography, radiography, magnetic resonance imaging] programs). Both campuses served as live and distance sites depending on instructor location and area of content expertise. For example, morning courses may be taught live from one campus, and afternoon classes taught live from the other campus. Only one program, physical therapy, offered labs by distance education. Response distributions were compared for questions by campus using Cochran-Armitage trend tests and analyzed de-identified qualitative comments using constant comparisons to establish themes.

Results: Student (n=121) and faculty (n=19) mostly agreed distance education technology was effective for teaching and learning. Significant differences were found in student opinions about receiving a similar educational experience between the two campuses. More students at the Main campus somewhat or strongly disagreed (n=34, 37%) it was similar compared to the Rural campus (n= 5, 17%, p=0.024). There were no comments specifically related to the physical therapy lab experience. Open-ended comment themes included training, purposeful engagement of both campus locations, and setting clear expectations.

Conclusions: Although differences in learning experiences exist between the main and rural campus locations; the results indicated using distance education technology is an effective means to deliver the curriculum. Both students and faculty commented about the lack of experience with the educational technology before implementation. Synchronous, distance education offers the opportunity for program expansion and effective delivery of curriculum content. Using the results of this study can enhance future education in allied health professions using synchronous distance education technology.


Are Audience Response Systems Worth The Cost? Comparing Question-Driven Teaching Strategies For Emergency Medical Technician Education, Lauren M. Maloney, James P. Dilger, Paul A. Werfel, Linda M. Cimino Dec 2017

Are Audience Response Systems Worth The Cost? Comparing Question-Driven Teaching Strategies For Emergency Medical Technician Education, Lauren M. Maloney, James P. Dilger, Paul A. Werfel, Linda M. Cimino

Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice

Purpose: As Emergency Medical Technician educators develop curricula to meet new national educational standards, effective teaching strategies validated for course content and unique student demographics are warranted. Three methods for answering multiple choice questions presented during lectures were compared: a) Audience Response System (ARS, clickers), b) hand-raising-with-eyes-closed (no-cost option), and c) passive response (no-cost option). The purpose was to determine if using the ARS resulted in improved exam scores. Method: 113 Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) students participated in this cross-over, block randomized, controlled trial, which was incorporated into their Cardiac Emergencies and Pulmonary Emergencies course lectures. Students took pretests, immediate ...


Developing Healthcare Practitioners’ Professional Expertise Through Effective Continuing Education: Commentary, Caroline Faucher Oct 2016

Developing Healthcare Practitioners’ Professional Expertise Through Effective Continuing Education: Commentary, Caroline Faucher

Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice

Development of professional expertise is the transition from novice to expert within a profession through deliberate practice with feedback. While this development is actively stimulated during undergraduate studies, encouraging practicing healthcare professionals to pursue their development towards expertise doesn’t seem as obvious. This commentary briefly describes the development of professional expertise and the possible decline in performance that can occur with time. It then gives insight into the roles of continuing professional education in healthcare practitioners’ acquisition and maintenance of professional expertise.


Enhancing Entry-Level Physiotherapy Student Learning In Interpreting Radiology – An Action Research Project, Courtney R. Clark, Andrea Bialocerkowski Oct 2016

Enhancing Entry-Level Physiotherapy Student Learning In Interpreting Radiology – An Action Research Project, Courtney R. Clark, Andrea Bialocerkowski

Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice

Purpose: In Australia, the ability to interpret orthopaedic x-rays is an entry-level skill for physiotherapists. Yet there is a paucity of evidence in the literature which details effective learning and teaching methods to optimise confidence and competence in x-ray interpretation. The aims of this study were to describe the content contained in an orthopaedic radiology module within an Australian 2-year graduate entry Master of Physiotherapy degree; approaches to learning and teaching used in this module; student satisfaction associated with this module over a 2-year period. Method: The University’s framework for quality assurance, which is based on the Plan-Implement-Review-Improve underpinned ...


Clinical Educator And Student Perceptions Of Ipad™ Technology To Enhance Clinical Supervision: The Electronically-Facilitated Feedback Initiative (Effi), Suzanne J. Snodgrass, Darren Rivett, Scott Farrell, Kyle Ball, Samantha E. Ashby, Catherine L. Johnston, Kim Nguyen, Trevor Russell Oct 2016

Clinical Educator And Student Perceptions Of Ipad™ Technology To Enhance Clinical Supervision: The Electronically-Facilitated Feedback Initiative (Effi), Suzanne J. Snodgrass, Darren Rivett, Scott Farrell, Kyle Ball, Samantha E. Ashby, Catherine L. Johnston, Kim Nguyen, Trevor Russell

Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice

Purpose: Growing demands placed upon healthcare systems require more health professionals to be trained. Clinical placement education is an integral component of health professional training, however accommodating increasing numbers of student placements is a challenge for health services. Personal digital assistants such as iPads™ may assist in delivery of clinical education, by facilitating transfer of knowledge and skills from clinical educators to health professional students, however such an initiative has not been formally investigated. The present study sought to explore perceptions of clinical educators and allied health students regarding the impact of an iPad™-based feedback delivery system on student ...


Athletic Training Students' Perceptions Of Electronic Textbooks And Computer Use In The Classroom, Christopher D. Brown, Shannon David, Michele Monaco Jan 2016

Athletic Training Students' Perceptions Of Electronic Textbooks And Computer Use In The Classroom, Christopher D. Brown, Shannon David, Michele Monaco

Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice

Purpose: Academia is currently seeing a surge in technology integration in the classroom. Electronic textbooks (e-textbooks) is expected to grow exponentially in the future. Although there is a rush in use of technology in academia, few studies have evaluated perceptions of electronic textbooks especially among athletic training students. The purpose of this study is to identify athletic training student computer use, if athletic students are using electronic textbooks, and to help understand their perceptions of those electronic texts. Method: A cross sectional survey design was utilized. Participants completed a self-reported online survey. A survey link was emailed to athletic training ...


Effect Of Two Semesters Of Small Group Problem-Based Learning (Pbl) On Expectations Of Physician Assistant Students Regarding Self, Others, And Facilitator Using The Pbl Readiness Questionnaire, Susan Hawkins, Mark Hertweck, Anthony Goreczny, John Laird Jan 2016

Effect Of Two Semesters Of Small Group Problem-Based Learning (Pbl) On Expectations Of Physician Assistant Students Regarding Self, Others, And Facilitator Using The Pbl Readiness Questionnaire, Susan Hawkins, Mark Hertweck, Anthony Goreczny, John Laird

Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess changes in expectations and perceptions among physician assistant (PA) program matriculants regarding small group problem-based learning (PBL) from the beginning to the end of the first didactic year. Some of the stress experienced by students entering health science professional programs using PBL may be due to lack of awareness of the goals and norms of PBL which differ from those of traditional lecture-based curricula. A change in student expectations as a result of participation in PBL would indicate that these goals and norms can be learned through participation. Methods: The authors ...


Training Hospital Readiness In Speech-Language Pathology Students Through Simulation, Anna Miles, Selena Donaldson, Philippa Friary Oct 2015

Training Hospital Readiness In Speech-Language Pathology Students Through Simulation, Anna Miles, Selena Donaldson, Philippa Friary

Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice

Simulated learning environments allow students to develop technical and clinical decision-making skills in a safe and realistic setting. The aim of this study was to evaluate speech-language pathology students’ perception of hospital readiness following a one-day simulation-based training day on swallowing management. Nineteen students attended the training day. Training included part-task skill learning and immersive simulated scenarios. Students were asked to complete course evaluation forms and participated in focus groups immediately after the day. Seven students participated in a further focus group after a five-week hospital placement within a month of the training day. Four students participated in a focus ...