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Full-Text Articles in Education

A Dangerous Game: The Dehumanization Of Children In Massachusetts Testing And Data Discourse, Gregory Shea Jan 2017

A Dangerous Game: The Dehumanization Of Children In Massachusetts Testing And Data Discourse, Gregory Shea

The Graduate Review

A great deal has been written about the ills of standardized testing, most of which focuses on their lack of validity and negative impacts on students. One topic that has not been explored in depth is the ways in which the discourse around testing can dehumanize public school students. This paper turns its attention to utterances of the Massachusetts Commissioner of Education, Mitchell Chester, along with the utterances of the superintendents of two large urban districts in Massachusetts. The thesis of this discourse analysis is that the words of these administrators betray an unconscious but troubling ideology of dehumanization. The ...


A Review Of: The Test: Why Our Schools Are Obsessed With Standardized Testing—But You Don’T Have To Be, Lasisi Ajayi May 2016

A Review Of: The Test: Why Our Schools Are Obsessed With Standardized Testing—But You Don’T Have To Be, Lasisi Ajayi

Wisdom in Education

This is a review of Anya Kamenetz's book, "The Test: Why our schools are obsessed with standardized testing—but you don’t have to be"


Tyranny Of The Meritocracy?: A Disputation Over Testing With Professor Lani Guinier, Dan Subotnik Jan 2015

Tyranny Of The Meritocracy?: A Disputation Over Testing With Professor Lani Guinier, Dan Subotnik

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


What Can Pisa Tell Us About U.S. Education Policy?, Linda Darling-Hammond Sep 2014

What Can Pisa Tell Us About U.S. Education Policy?, Linda Darling-Hammond

New England Journal of Public Policy

Despite years of attention to “reform” in the United States, overall achievement on international assessments such as PISA has not improved during the period from 2000 to 2012. Reforms focused on high-stakes testing attached to sanctions, expansions of charter schools, and a market-based approach to teaching have been unsuccessful in changing outcomes. Meanwhile, growing childhood poverty, along with increasing segregation, income inequality, and disparities in school spending, have expanded the opportunity gap. Lessons from other nations and successful states indicate that systematic government investments in high-need schools along with capacity-building that improves the knowledge and skills of educators and the ...


Making Assessment Everyone’S Business: The Use Of Dialogue In Improving Teaching And Learning, John Chetro-Szivos, Lauren Mackenzie Jan 2008

Making Assessment Everyone’S Business: The Use Of Dialogue In Improving Teaching And Learning, John Chetro-Szivos, Lauren Mackenzie

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

In the 2007/2008 academic year, five faculty in the Department of Communication Media at Fitchburg State College came together to seek ways to be proactive in addressing the challenges imposed by outcomes assessment. The goal of this study was to see if opportunities existed to find constructive ways to engage assessment beyond the positions of those who are opposed or cautious about it. This article introduces a communication perspective for studying assessment; provides a detailed overview of the components of the study; discusses the findings and connects them to a systemic approach for looking at assessment; and concludes by ...


Quiet, Do Not Disturb: Prying Open The Door To Examine Our Worlds Of Testing And Assessment, Amma Akrofi, Carole Janisch, Mellinee Lesley, Robin Griffith, Xiaoming Liu Jan 2007

Quiet, Do Not Disturb: Prying Open The Door To Examine Our Worlds Of Testing And Assessment, Amma Akrofi, Carole Janisch, Mellinee Lesley, Robin Griffith, Xiaoming Liu

Essays in Education

Teacher educators recount their personal experiences related to testing and assessment. Through the examination of these experiences stemming from collegial conversations, the individuals have come to better understand the issues and challenges their university students, preservice and inservice teachers, will face in their classroom settings. Along with theory and research, the realities encountered by these individuals become “course capital.” The content of their current and future university literacy courses and assessment courses reflects their renewed emphasis on responsive and child-centered instruction as opposed to the untoward focus on testing.


Meaningful Assessment Promotes Meaningful Learning, Diane K. Brantley May 2006

Meaningful Assessment Promotes Meaningful Learning, Diane K. Brantley

Wisdom in Education

Since the enactment of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act in 1965, America’s schools have faced enhanced scrutiny by the public sector. Larger demands have been placed on children to perform at increasingly higher levels of achievement in reading and math, often beginning as early as kindergarten. Teachers and institutions of higher education have also felt the surge of outside pressure to “perform” wash over them.


To Wonder, Wander, And Linger In The World Of Standardized Testing, Randall Wright, Alayne Sullivan May 2005

To Wonder, Wander, And Linger In The World Of Standardized Testing, Randall Wright, Alayne Sullivan

Wisdom in Education

The standards movement began as a nobly-intended effort to establish a core curriculum—a template of knowledge and skills that would guide teaching and learning across the K-12 curriculum. Our attempts to standardize curriculum may have unintended and deleterious side-effect: The atrophying of the mind’s natural tendencies for exploratory play and inherently imaginative dimensions. This paper engages us in a critical remembering of our pedagogical relationships with children. It reminds us of children’s ways of being and asks how we might engage them in a rigorous appreciation of curricular literacies without thwarting their wonderful wanderings. Ultimately, we worry ...


High-Stakes Testing And Special Populations, Gary H. Sherwin, Todd Jennings May 2005

High-Stakes Testing And Special Populations, Gary H. Sherwin, Todd Jennings

Wisdom in Education

This opinion paper critically examines the use of high-stakes testing on special populations. Without appropriate accommodations, standardized exams are not valid for some students with special needs. Unfortunately, many classroom teachers who must initiate testing accommodations lack knowledge of appropriate accommodations and regularly fail to provide the necessary testing accommodations. The deficit understanding of testing accommodations makes comparisons between classrooms, schools, and districts invalid since some scores loose validity. Solutions specific to standardized testing and students with special needs are offered and a more encompassing solution to the problems incurred from these tests when used for high-stakes is suggested.


High-Stakes Testing And Assessment: One Is Not The Other, Enrique Murillo, Alayne Sullivan May 2005

High-Stakes Testing And Assessment: One Is Not The Other, Enrique Murillo, Alayne Sullivan

Wisdom in Education

Since the institution of the common school and the advent of universal education, Americans have placed tremendous faith in public schools. Public education cultivates an informed citizenry, one of the pillars of a liberal democracy. But more importantly, schools are a repository for our common dreams of human potential and individual self-actualization. Because they so thoroughly shape the lives and life-chances of our youth, school issues are freighted with an emotional charge. Education remains the last fully public American institution, one in which millions of students cast their common lot daily and strive to become better readers, better citizens, better ...


It’S Time To Upgrade: Tests And Administration Procedures For The New Millennium, Michael Russell Apr 2002

It’S Time To Upgrade: Tests And Administration Procedures For The New Millennium, Michael Russell

Essays in Education

Increasing use of computers in schools has led to a mis-alignment between the way some students develop skill and knowledge and how they are tested. This paper reviews past research that demonstrates that paper-based tests that require students to produce written responses underestimate the achievement of students who are accustomed to writing on computer. The paper then explores how learning that occurs through other instructional uses of computers is not adequately captured by current testing practices. The paper argues that new approaches should be explored to better measure student learning.