Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Education

View From The Classroom, Rowan Cahill Dec 1991

View From The Classroom, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Edited version of a speech given by Rowan Cahill to the Australian Education Network's 'Vision for the Future' Conference, Sydney, 18 October 1991.


The Decline Of History, Rowan Cahill Jan 1977

The Decline Of History, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Written at a time when the teaching of 'History' was declining in Australian secondary schools (1970s), this is a view from the classroom by a classroom teacher. The author trenchantly defends the place of 'History' as a subject in Secondary schools, and opposes its teaching by non-history trained teachers, as well as the introduction of 'thematic' approaches. Instead he defends a broad 'History' curriculum, the exploration of cause and effect, and for Senior students, their introduction to the notion of 'historiography'.


The Decline Of History, Rowan Cahill Dec 1976

The Decline Of History, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

The author addresses the contemporary (1970s) loss of confidence, and interest, in history as a subject amongst Australian secondary school students and educational administrators. He mounts a defence of the teaching of the subject in schools, and argues for its complexities. Strategies to increase the appeal of the subject and its perceived relevance are suggested.


The Lost Ideal, Rowan Cahill, R Connell, B Freeman, T Irving, B Scribner Oct 1967

The Lost Ideal, Rowan Cahill, R Connell, B Freeman, T Irving, B Scribner

Rowan Cahill

Authored alphabetically by R. Cahill, R. Connell, B. Freeman, T. Irving, and B. Scribner, “The Lost Ideal” was published in the Sydney University student newspaper 'honi soit' on Tuesday, 3 October 1967. It was the foundation manifesto of what was to become known as the Free U, initially operating out of rented premises in Redfern (Sydney) before moving to premises in nearby suburbs. The first Free U courses commenced in December 1967, and early in the new year involved 150 people. At its peak, during the summer of 1968-1969, over 300 people were involved in courses. The Sydney experiment, which ...