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Iowa Science Teachers Journal

1975

Articles 31 - 54 of 54

Full-Text Articles in Education

Trends In Secondary Science Enrollments In Iowa, Gary Downs Jan 1975

Trends In Secondary Science Enrollments In Iowa, Gary Downs

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Enrollment data were collected from the district administration for the five reported years starting with the 1968-69 school year. The data for the 1973-74 school year were collected at the school level. Collection at the school level should provide a more representative data bank for the academic programs. All the science offerings were grouped into the following seven categories: biology, chemistry, earth science, enrichment science, general science, physical science, and physics. It is interesting to note that in the 1968-69 data collection only 19 different courses were reported. In the succeeding years, 25, 56, 71, 74, and 96 were reported …


The Copper Ion (Kingston Collegiate And Vocational Institute) Jan 1975

The Copper Ion (Kingston Collegiate And Vocational Institute)

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

The Copper Ion is a weekly publication of Ivar Peterson's grade 12 chemistry class at Kingston Collegiate and Vocational Institute.


Iowa Academy Of Science Celebrates Centennial Anniversary Of Founding, Robert W. Hanson Jan 1975

Iowa Academy Of Science Celebrates Centennial Anniversary Of Founding, Robert W. Hanson

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

April 17-19, 1975, marks the observance of an important historical event in Iowa, for it was in 1875 that Charles E. Bessey and a handful of scientists and medical men conceived the original Iowa Academy of Science. One hundred years have produced fantastic changes in life in Iowa, and the Academy of today has almost forgotten its heritage. It has grown from a small fellowship of men dedicated to furthering scientific work in Iowa to 1,400 members-a sizable cross section of the entire scientific community representing pure and applied research, conservation activity, engineering, economics and all levels of education and …


Cover - Iowa Science Teachers Section Officers & Regional Directors - Front Matter - Table Of Contents Jan 1975

Cover - Iowa Science Teachers Section Officers & Regional Directors - Front Matter - Table Of Contents

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

No abstract provided.


Coal? What's That? Jan 1975

Coal? What's That?

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

In any analysis of the energy resources now available to the United States of America, coal occupies a dominant if not a preeminent position. The very fact that, within the borders of the U.S., there is more energy in the form of coal (more than three trillion tons) than in all of the other combined resources of fossil fuel-petroleum, natural gas, oil shale, and bituminous sandstone-makes coal loom as our most important source of energy for the remaining years of this century, and perhaps for centuries to come.


On The Feasibility Of Coal-Driven Power Stations, O. R. Frisch Jan 1975

On The Feasibility Of Coal-Driven Power Stations, O. R. Frisch

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

The recent discovery of coal (black, fossilized plant remains) in a number of places offers an interesting alternative to the production of power from fission. Some of the places where coal has been found show indeed signs of previous exploitation by prehistoric men, who, however, probably used it for jewels and to blacken their faces at religious ceremonies. The power potentials depend on the fact that coal can be readily oxidized, with the production of a high temperature and an energy of about 0.0000001 megawatt days per gram. That is, of course, very little, but large amounts of coal (perhaps …


Notes On Science Teaching - 2, Leonard H. Sibley Jan 1975

Notes On Science Teaching - 2, Leonard H. Sibley

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

How are you going to teach? The cone of experience.


Notes On Science Teaching - 1, Sherman Lundy Jan 1975

Notes On Science Teaching - 1, Sherman Lundy

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Many teachers seem to operate from a partial teaching model that does not adequately relate the various parts to the whole of science education. The current state of affairs is much like that of the six blind men describing an elephant. Each teacher sees in part and formulates a description of science education from that point of view. As a result, teachers often become torn between subject matter; student needs; teaching techniques; administrative, community, and governmental influences; and other concerns, all tending to fragment the approach to science education.


Scientific Instrumentation: It's Older Than You Think Jan 1975

Scientific Instrumentation: It's Older Than You Think

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

If you accidentally walked into the wrong room at a university and found yourself surrounded by balances, glass tubing, Bunsen burners, flasks, beakers and the like, you could safely assume that you had entered a chemistry laboratory. Had the room been filled with timers, force tables, pulleys, oscilloscopes and the like, it might be a physics lab. The tools and instruments a scientist uses betray not only his profession but often his current line of research and the questions he is asking. In the space below a major scientific instrument is described. Read the list slowly and try to identify …


Nsta Bicentennial Essay Award Jan 1975

Nsta Bicentennial Essay Award

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

As part of its Bicentennial Year activities, the National Science Teachers Association is sponsoring a prize competition for papers on the history of science education in the United States.


Environmental Science Units Jan 1975

Environmental Science Units

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Additional information concerning the following teaching units may be obtained from the Minnesota Environmental Sciences Foundation, Inc.


Dubuque Symposium Jan 1975

Dubuque Symposium

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

On Saturday October 25, 1975, the University of Dubuque is planning its 3rd Annual Science and Mathematics Educators' Symposium.


Team Orientation In The Chemistry Laboratory, David N. West Jan 1975

Team Orientation In The Chemistry Laboratory, David N. West

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

The importance of laboratory experience for students is widely accepted by chemistry educators and usually includes the following behavioral objectives: 1. Training in the scientific method. 2. Developing skills with laboratory apparatus. 3. Learning and applying chemical theory. 4. Communicating laboratory results. It is the opinion of this writer that through a team orientation approach to instruction other behavioral objectives can be attained in laboratory situations that are also useful to students pursuing professional careers in chemistry.


A Checklist In Science Education For Evaluating Student Teaching, James J. Hungerford Jan 1975

A Checklist In Science Education For Evaluating Student Teaching, James J. Hungerford

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Have you noticed how little some cooperating teachers let their student teachers do? If "learning is by doing," a lot of student teachers aren't learning very much. I've seen student teachers teach only one or two weeks out of nine. Student teachers and supervisors should have a common checklist of activities that they can include as part of the student teaching experience. This may help the teacher who lectures frequently to do something besides talk. The aim would_ be mutual improvement and increased competence.


Exotic Food From Fermented Milk, Robert C. Goss Jan 1975

Exotic Food From Fermented Milk, Robert C. Goss

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Whether prepared or bought at the market, yogurt is a dairy product made from milk -- cow, mare, sow, goat, buffalo, etc. Bacteria cultures of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus are added to the milk with the result that the milk sugar is split into lactic acid. The casein, lactalbumin and milk proteins are broken down into peptones and amino acids. Finished yogurt has about 200,000,000 bacteria per ml and is rich in the vitamin B complex. Yogurt making is a manifestation of microbial ecology.


Algae And Energy, James J. Hungerford Jan 1975

Algae And Energy, James J. Hungerford

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

The extent to which algae contribute to human welfare is often forgotten, ignored or unappreciated. Many types of algae serve as bases in commercially prepared foods and condiments. Algal products are used in cosmetics, textiles, pharmaceuticals and paints. In Asia, algae are often mixed and served with rice and fish to supplement the human diet. In coastal areas of the world, kelps are often chopped as food for livestock. The alga Poryphyra is cultivated in Japan to supply a 65 million pound annual market.


Mit To Study Nonconventional Protein Sources Jan 1975

Mit To Study Nonconventional Protein Sources

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

A major study of the world's nonconventional protein resources has been started by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a $185,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.


The Abo's Of Blood Types, Willard F. Hollander, Wilmer J. Miller Jan 1975

The Abo's Of Blood Types, Willard F. Hollander, Wilmer J. Miller

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

For high school age students the blood types can be a useful introduction to heredity. It has been shown, for example, that if both parents are type O, their children must all be type O: it is recessive to A and to B.


Officers, Iowa Academy Of Science; Officers, Editors, Regional Directors, Iowa Science Teachers Section; Editorial Review Board Jan 1975

Officers, Iowa Academy Of Science; Officers, Editors, Regional Directors, Iowa Science Teachers Section; Editorial Review Board

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

No abstract provided.


Publications Jan 1975

Publications

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Short comments regarding the publications:

Heredity and You: How You Can Protect Your Family's Future, by Augusta Greenblatt

To Understand Is to Invent (The Future of Education), by Jean Piaget

How to Make Your Science Project Scientific, by Thomas Moorman

Exploring Energy Choices, preliminary report of the Ford Foundation's Energy Policy Project

Energy Perspectives from the Batelle Institute

Indoor-Outdoor Natural Learning Experiences: A Teacher's Guide


Metric News: Points To Remember, George Fors Jan 1975

Metric News: Points To Remember, George Fors

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

A list of “points to remember” regarding the metric system and metric units.


Earth Incorporated, Robert Rienow, Leona Train Rienow Jan 1975

Earth Incorporated, Robert Rienow, Leona Train Rienow

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

"Earth" is a proper name. Do we speak of "the mars," or of "the jupiter," or of "the venus"? Then why "the earth"? It is a degradation of both our thinking and our very special planet.


Cover - Front Matter - Table Of Contents Jan 1975

Cover - Front Matter - Table Of Contents

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

No abstract provided.


The Bicentennial Jan 1975

The Bicentennial

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

The Bicentennial will be celebrated in Iowa classrooms in many ways. By looking back on past scientific achievements, students may be better able to understand and appreciate the present and predict the future.