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Full-Text Articles in Education

Schools In Balance: Comparing Iowa Physics Teachers And Teaching In Large And Small Schools, Trevor Kittleson, Jeffrey T. Morgan Jan 2012

Schools In Balance: Comparing Iowa Physics Teachers And Teaching In Large And Small Schools, Trevor Kittleson, Jeffrey T. Morgan

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

In 2009 we surveyed all known Iowa high school physics teachers to gain insight into their educational backgrounds, instructional styles, content coverage, and available resources. Based upon a suggestion made at a subsequent presentation, we reexamined the collected data, comparing the responses of teachers from small and large schools to see if there were notable differences between the two populations. We found that teachers at larger schools teach a wider variety of physics courses, including more advanced and “physics first” style courses, and report stronger educational backgrounds in physics. While larger schools also have more financial resources allocated for physics ...


Title Page - Table Of Contents Jan 2012

Title Page - Table Of Contents

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

No abstract provided.


What Should We Flip?, Jerrid Kruse Jan 2012

What Should We Flip?, Jerrid Kruse

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Educational fads are nothing new. Renaming or repackaging of old ideas are also not new. Indeed, anyone who has been in education for more than a few years will recognize how the pendulum of educational reform swings back and forth. Unfortunately, although things “change,” the change is not typically accompanied by “improvement” on a grand scale. One current trend is the notion of “flipping” or the “flipped classroom”.


Thinking Outside The Box: Using A Black Box Activity To Kick Off The School Year, Amanda Weeks, Stephanie Schemmel Jan 2012

Thinking Outside The Box: Using A Black Box Activity To Kick Off The School Year, Amanda Weeks, Stephanie Schemmel

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

This article discusses our approach to the first days of school. Students' first experiences in our classroom set the tone for the rest of the year. We start out the year with a black-box activity to engage students and begin helping our students understand the nature of science. This activity promotes National Science Education Standards G and Iowa Teaching Standards 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8.


How Does Your Reading Stack Up? Effective Teaching Practices Make For Successful Reading Experiences In The Classroom, Jennifer A. R. Smith, Lori Marie Ihrig Jan 2012

How Does Your Reading Stack Up? Effective Teaching Practices Make For Successful Reading Experiences In The Classroom, Jennifer A. R. Smith, Lori Marie Ihrig

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

This article provides teachers concrete strategies for applying knowledge of how people learn and effective teaching practices to decisions about classroom implementation of science content area readings. This article promotes Iowa Teaching Standards 1, 3, 4, 5, and 6.


Searching The Web: Observing Spiders To Learn How Different Structures Serve Different Functions, Courtney King Jan 2012

Searching The Web: Observing Spiders To Learn How Different Structures Serve Different Functions, Courtney King

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Through exploration and small group discussion, first grade students made connections between physical structures of organisms and their function. Additionally, students explored various spider “homes”. This activity promotes National Science Education Content Standard C.


Cloudy Judgment: Helping Students Deeply Understand Cloud Formation, Katie Borton, Hallie Satre, Jesse Wilcox Jan 2011

Cloudy Judgment: Helping Students Deeply Understand Cloud Formation, Katie Borton, Hallie Satre, Jesse Wilcox

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Weather is ubiquitously experienced, yet generally misunderstood by students. We present the well known “cloud in the bottle” activity, but do so in a manner that mentally engages students to a greater extent, identifies commonly held misconceptions, and moves students to a deeper understanding of cloud formation. This activity promotes National Science Education Standards A, B, D and G and Iowa Teaching Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.


What’S My Motivation? Ideas For Rethinking Student Assessment, Jerrid Kruse Jan 2011

What’S My Motivation? Ideas For Rethinking Student Assessment, Jerrid Kruse

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Three of the articles in this issue of the Iowa Science Teachers Journal address assessment in the science classroom. Jesse Wilcox and Frank Noschese each discuss standards-based grading (SBG). Frank provides examples of his approach to SBG in his physics classes and makes a strong case for SBG while Jesse adds detail by sharing the frameworks he uses to inform and implement his SBG practices. Joe Bower goes a bit further by encouraging readers to consider why we assign grades at all. Each of the articles raises important, and related, points about the connection between assessment and motivation.


Title Page - Table Of Contents Jan 2011

Title Page - Table Of Contents

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

No abstract provided.


Hot Conceptual Change - You’Ve Got To Have Faith, Jerrid Kruse, Michael P. Clough Jan 2011

Hot Conceptual Change - You’Ve Got To Have Faith, Jerrid Kruse, Michael P. Clough

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

In the last editorial (Kruse and Clough, 2010), we addressed some common concerns educators raise when considering inquiry-based instruction. Addressing such concerns is of utmost importance to address the plausibility, intelligibility and fruitfulness of inquiry-based teaching. Unfortunately, such issues are not all that affect willingness to enact inquiry-based teaching. More personal and contextual factors also play a part in all learning, including learning how to teach more effectively.


Growing Minds: Planting A Lasting Seed Using The Learning Cycle, Jennifer Nicole Prindle, Lori Marie Ihrig Jan 2011

Growing Minds: Planting A Lasting Seed Using The Learning Cycle, Jennifer Nicole Prindle, Lori Marie Ihrig

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

This article highlights modifying a common early elementary activity to move instruction beyond isolated activities into a full unit of instruction using the learning cycle. The unit is designed to tackle students' misconceptions and deepen their understanding of scientific inquiry and the growing requirements of plants. This activity promotes National Science Education Standards A and C, and Iowa Teaching Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.


How Do You Mass What You Cannot See? Using Paper Clips To Help Students Learn How Electron Mass Was First Measured, Rob Hingstrum, Jacob Pleasants, Shannon Mclaughlin Jan 2011

How Do You Mass What You Cannot See? Using Paper Clips To Help Students Learn How Electron Mass Was First Measured, Rob Hingstrum, Jacob Pleasants, Shannon Mclaughlin

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Many students wrongly presume that scientific knowledge is mysteriously discovered and often believe the development of this knowledge is beyond their ability to comprehend. The activity presented here – appropriate for high-school chemistry and physics students – challenges these misconceptions. Students are engaged in thinking and creativity similar to how the first scientists accurately measured the mass and charge of an electron. Through this process, students develop a deep understanding of how the mass and charge of an individual electron was determined. This activity addresses National Science Education Standards A, B, E, and G and Iowa teaching Standards 1, 2, 3, 4 ...


One Touchy Topic: Targeting Students’ Sense Of Touch Through Multiple Activities, Ally Shinar, Rabihah Simmons, Megan Ross Jan 2011

One Touchy Topic: Targeting Students’ Sense Of Touch Through Multiple Activities, Ally Shinar, Rabihah Simmons, Megan Ross

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

This article provides exploratory experiences for First Grade students to refine their understanding of their sense of touch and develop their observation skills. The activities scaffold from open-ended exploratory investigations to application activities in which students categorize items using their understanding of touch. The activities also make explicit links to help students develop language and writing skills. This activity promotes National Science Education Content Standards A and B, and Iowa Teaching Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6.


Title Page - Table Of Contents Jan 2011

Title Page - Table Of Contents

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

No abstract provided.


Wiggling Worms: Using The Learning Cycle In An Elementary Classroom To Study Variation, Lori Marie Ihrig, Jennifer Nicole Prindle Jan 2011

Wiggling Worms: Using The Learning Cycle In An Elementary Classroom To Study Variation, Lori Marie Ihrig, Jennifer Nicole Prindle

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

In grades K-2, students are at an age when they start to look closely at living things around them. They can comprehend that while individuals may be of the same kind (i.e., kittens from the same litter), they possess differences. This article uses the learning cycle to engage students in making observations and measurements about plants and animals in order to help them understand “there is variation among individuals of one kind in a population” (AAAS, 1993, p. 107). This article promotes National Science Education Standards A and C, and Iowa Teaching Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and ...


All Bottled Up: An Inquiry Activity Using Bottles To Teach The Effect Of Water Temperature On Dissolved Gas, Collin Reichert, Curtis Titter Jan 2011

All Bottled Up: An Inquiry Activity Using Bottles To Teach The Effect Of Water Temperature On Dissolved Gas, Collin Reichert, Curtis Titter

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

This article describes an inquiry activity that promotes an accurate and deep understanding of key components of the carbon cycle, namely the exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas between the atmosphere and the ocean, and how temperature affects this exchange. The crucial role of the teacher during this activity is described, including key questions and interactions that help students arrive at deep and robust understandings of the carbon cycle and nature of science ideas. This article promotes High School National Science Education Content Standards A, B, D, and G, Iowa Core Curriculum 1 and 3, and Iowa Teaching Standards ...


The Buds And The Bees: Inquiry Into The Sexual Reproduction Of Plants, Timothy D. Goodman, Laurence H. Woodruff Jan 2011

The Buds And The Bees: Inquiry Into The Sexual Reproduction Of Plants, Timothy D. Goodman, Laurence H. Woodruff

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Many students have few significant experiences investigating flower structure and function, yet are expected to understand sexual reproduction in angiosperms. We present here an inquiry-based hands-on activity where middle school students compare plant reproduction to more commonly understood animal reproduction. This provides a foundation to more deeply understand topics related to plant reproduction. This activity also provides many opportunities to explicitly address the nature of science and how science works. This article addresses National Science Education Content Standards A, C, and G, and Iowa Teaching Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.


Title Page - Table Of Contents Jan 2011

Title Page - Table Of Contents

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

No abstract provided.


Holding Ourselves To A Higher Standard: Using Standards-Based Grading In Science As A Means To Improve Teaching And Learning, Jesse Wilcox Jan 2011

Holding Ourselves To A Higher Standard: Using Standards-Based Grading In Science As A Means To Improve Teaching And Learning, Jesse Wilcox

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Standards-based grading (SBG) has grown in popularity over the past few years. However, many teachers wonder why they should switch from a traditional grading system. This article explores how standards-based grading can more accurately reflect what students learn and encourage changes in students’ attitude toward learning in the process. This article promotes Iowa Teaching Standards 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8.


A Better Road: Improve Teaching And Student Morale Through Standards-Based Grading, Frank Noschese Jan 2011

A Better Road: Improve Teaching And Student Morale Through Standards-Based Grading, Frank Noschese

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

This article explores the benefits of using a standards-based grading system. Examples of how such a system is used in a high school physics course are also provided.


The Trouble With Grading: From Concealing To Revealing Real Learning, Joe Bower Jan 2011

The Trouble With Grading: From Concealing To Revealing Real Learning, Joe Bower

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Traditional grading, such as multiple choice and bubble filling testing, cannot provide the sort of information needed by the teacher to assess a student’s understanding. There is a better way. This article explains the author’s move to break away from traditional grading and replace it with a zero-question project-based assessment strategy.


One Big Bite: Teaching Elementary Students To Classify Objects Using Animal Teeth, Katelyn Boser, Nicole Eberhard, Amanda Gerhardy Jan 2011

One Big Bite: Teaching Elementary Students To Classify Objects Using Animal Teeth, Katelyn Boser, Nicole Eberhard, Amanda Gerhardy

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

This activity helps students learn the skills of sorting, organizing and classifying using images or models of various animal teeth. The authors used this activity in a Second Grade classroom, however it could be modified for other primary grades. This activity promotes National Science Education Content Standards A and C, and Iowa Teaching Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.


Learning Under Pressure: Teaching Boyle’S Law Through Inquiry, Meagan Woestman, Adam Kent Jan 2011

Learning Under Pressure: Teaching Boyle’S Law Through Inquiry, Meagan Woestman, Adam Kent

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Boyle’s law is commonly addressed in chemistry and physical science textbooks, but rarely in a manner consistent with what we know best promotes learning (Bransford, Brown & Cocking, 2000). We present the standard syringe activity as an exploratory inquiry experience followed by a more formal development of the relationship. The activity starts and concludes by having students examine how the volume of a crushed pop bottle changes in a vacuum. Through iterative concrete experiences and guided discussions, students construct Boyle’s law to account for the class data. This article address National Science Education Standards A, B, E, G, and ...


The Price Of Inquiry: Managing Open-Inquiry Through Scaffolding And Faux Grant Writing, Shawn Cornally Jan 2010

The Price Of Inquiry: Managing Open-Inquiry Through Scaffolding And Faux Grant Writing, Shawn Cornally

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Open-inquiry involves students asking their own questions, designing their own investigation, and creating their own explanations in order to learn about the natural world. However, implementing open-inquiry is often daunting for teachers and frustrating for students. This article discusses how I use guided inquiry to help students prepare for open-inquiry and a faux grant process to manage open-inquiry in my class. This activity promotes National Science Education Content Standards A, B, E, G, and Iowa Teaching Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6.


Temperature Rising: Investigating Rates Of Temperature Change, Jacob Norlin, Daryl Miller Jan 2010

Temperature Rising: Investigating Rates Of Temperature Change, Jacob Norlin, Daryl Miller

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

This exploratory activity, designed for secondary physical science or earth science students, investigates rates of temperature change over bodies of water and land. Students discuss temperature trends of several cities across the United States, which creates an opportunity to conduct classroom experiments to explain these trends. Students write procedures and generate data of temperature changes between areas of water and land. Students gain a valuable, concrete experience of temperature changes which in turn enables them to better understand and explain why similar cities experience vastly different temperature patterns. This activity can then serve as a basis to address the abstract ...


Title Page - Table Of Contents Jan 2010

Title Page - Table Of Contents

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

No abstract provided.


Conceptual Change: It’S Not Just For Teaching Science, Michael P. Clough, Jerrid Kruse Jan 2010

Conceptual Change: It’S Not Just For Teaching Science, Michael P. Clough, Jerrid Kruse

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Mark Twain is often given credit for saying, “It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so.” Science teachers likely resonate with this quote because we know our students come to class confidently holding many ideas about the natural world that “just ain't so.”


The Plot Thickens: Using A Plotting Activity To Start Your School Year Strong, Joe Taylor Jan 2010

The Plot Thickens: Using A Plotting Activity To Start Your School Year Strong, Joe Taylor

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

Captivating students and setting high expectations for critical thinking are two key classroom goals. This plotting and graphing activity is designed specifically to achieve these goals. Additionally, this activity can be modified for any science course taught at the secondary school level. Support materials including teacher and student printouts are provided at the end of the article. This activity promotes National Science Education Standards A, C, D, and F and Iowa Teaching Standards 1, 3, 4, 5, and 6.


Impact!: Improving Student Learning Through An Inquiry Crater Investigation, Blake J. Williams, Derek J. Hollingshead Jan 2010

Impact!: Improving Student Learning Through An Inquiry Crater Investigation, Blake J. Williams, Derek J. Hollingshead

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

The fight against student compartmentalization of science concepts is an ongoing battle for all science educators. When an inquiry-based investigation of natural phenomena, like that presented here, is integrated into curricula new links between science concepts are created. These new connections promote a deep and robust understanding of science content. This cratering activity has students applying prior knowledge of gravitational forces, momentum, conservation of energy, and density while exploring the intricate relationships between these fundamental concepts. This activity also provides abundant opportunities for explicit connections to the nature of science. Impact cratering is a phenomena which can be easily modeled ...


Title Page - Table Of Contents Jan 2010

Title Page - Table Of Contents

Iowa Science Teachers Journal

No abstract provided.