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Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

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Articles 121 - 136 of 136

Full-Text Articles in Education

Validity And Problem-Based Learning Research: A Review Of Instruments Used To Assess Intended Learning Outcomes, Brian R. Belland, Brian F. French, Peggy A. Ertmer Mar 2009

Validity And Problem-Based Learning Research: A Review Of Instruments Used To Assess Intended Learning Outcomes, Brian R. Belland, Brian F. French, Peggy A. Ertmer

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

Problem-based learning (PBL) spread from the medical school to other university and K-12 contexts due, in part, to the stated promise that PBL produces the target outcomes of deep content learning, increased problem-solving ability, and increased self-directed learning (Hmelo-Silver, 2004). However, research results have been unclear. This paper examines how the three target outcomes were measured in 33 empirical studies. Results indicate that few studies included (a) theoretical frameworks for the assessed variables/constructs, (b) rationales for how chosen assessments matched the constructs measured, or (c) other information required for readers to assess the validity of authors’ interpretations. Implications for ...


When Is Pbl More Effective? A Meta-Synthesis Of Meta-Analyses Comparing Pbl To Conventional Classrooms, Johannes Strobel, Angela Van Barneveld Mar 2009

When Is Pbl More Effective? A Meta-Synthesis Of Meta-Analyses Comparing Pbl To Conventional Classrooms, Johannes Strobel, Angela Van Barneveld

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

Problem-based learning (PBL) has been utilized for over 40 years in a variety of different disciplines. Although extensively researched, there is heated debate about the effectiveness of PBL. Several meta-analyses were conducted that provided a synthesis of the effects of PBL in comparison to traditional forms of instruction. This study used a qualitative meta-synthesis approach to compare and contrast the assumptions and findings of the meta-analytical research on the effectiveness of PBL. Findings indicated that PBL was superior when it comes to long-term retention, skill development and satisfaction of students and teachers, while traditional approaches were more effective for short-term ...


A Problem Based Learning Meta Analysis: Differences Across Problem Types, Implementation Types, Disciplines, And Assessment Levels, Andrew Walker, Heather Leary Mar 2009

A Problem Based Learning Meta Analysis: Differences Across Problem Types, Implementation Types, Disciplines, And Assessment Levels, Andrew Walker, Heather Leary

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

Problem based learning (PBL) in its most current form originated in Medical Education but has since been used in a variety of disciplines (Savery & Duffy, 1995) at a variety of educational levels (Savery, 2006). Although recent meta analyses have been conducted (Dochy, Segers, Van den Bossche, & Gijbels, 2003; Gijbels, Dochy, Van den Bossche, & Segers, 2005) that attempted to go beyond medical education, they found only one study in economics and were unable to explain large portions of the variance across results. This work builds upon their efforts as a meta-analysis that crosses disciplines as well as categorizes the types of problems used (Jonassen, 2000), the PBL approach employed (Barrows, 1986), and the level of assessment (Gijbels et al., 2005; Sugrue, 1993, 1995). Across 82 studies and 201 outcomes the findings favor PBL (d = 0.13, +/- .025) with a lack of homogeneity (Q = 954.27) that warrants a closer examination of moderating factors.


Introduction: Summarizing Findings And Looking Ahead To A New Generation Of Pbl Research, Jason Ravitz Mar 2009

Introduction: Summarizing Findings And Looking Ahead To A New Generation Of Pbl Research, Jason Ravitz

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

The articles in this issue effectively summarize three decades of Problem Based Learning (PBL) research. The meta-analysis (Walker & Leary) and meta-synthesis (Strobel & van Barneveld) articles review outcomes of studies conducted from 1976 to 2007 that compared a PBL curriculum to a traditional curriculum. The third article offers a critique of assessments used in these studies. This commentary highlights the conclusions of the articles and their unique contributions to our understanding of PBL and the breadth of its impact. Issues to be addressed in future research are discussed.


Engaging Teachers’ Pedagogical Content Knowledge: Adopting A Nine-Step Problem-Based Learning Model, Karen C. Goodnough, Woei Hung Oct 2008

Engaging Teachers’ Pedagogical Content Knowledge: Adopting A Nine-Step Problem-Based Learning Model, Karen C. Goodnough, Woei Hung

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

Engaging primary and elementary students in meaningful, relevant science learning is challenging. PBL is an instructional approach that provides a means to foster meaningful science learning while enhancing teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). This paper reports on the experiences of a teacher inquiry group consisting of five teachers (K-5) and a university researcher as they adopted a nine-step problem design model to develop PBL experiences. The objectives of the study were to examine how various facets of teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge are engaged as they design PBL modules; describe how teachers engage with a nine-step problem design model; and document ...


All Problems Are Not Equal: Implications For Problem-Based Learning, David H. Jonassen, Woei Hung Oct 2008

All Problems Are Not Equal: Implications For Problem-Based Learning, David H. Jonassen, Woei Hung

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional model that assumes the centrality of problems to learning. Research on PBL has focused on student learning, student roles, tutor roles, problem design, and technology use (Hung, Jonassen, & Liu, 2008), but little attention in the PBL literature has been paid to the nature of the problems that provide the focus for PBL. In this paper, we articulate a model for evaluating problem difficulty. Problem difficulty is define in terms of complexity, including breadth of knowledge, attainment level, intricacy of procedures, relational complexity, and problem structuredness including intransparency, heterogeneity of interpretations, interdisciplinarity, dynamicity, or competing ...


Teacher As Designer: A Framework For Teacher Analysis Of Mathematical Model-Eliciting Activities, Margret A. Hjalmarson, Heidi Diefes-Dux Jan 2008

Teacher As Designer: A Framework For Teacher Analysis Of Mathematical Model-Eliciting Activities, Margret A. Hjalmarson, Heidi Diefes-Dux

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

The study investigated tool development by three middle school mathematics teachers. The tools they designed were intended to support the use of model-eliciting activities (a form of instruction related to problem-based learning) and particularly the students’ presentations of their solutions for the whole class. The study examined the design and purposes for the presentation tools and resulted in a framework for categorizing teachers’ purposes for tools.The framework addressed the unit of analysis for the tools (individual students or groups of students) and the nature of teachers’ purposes for the tools. Design research was used as a theoretical perspective for ...


The Effects Of Multimedia-Supported Problem-Based Inquiry On Student Engagement, Empathy, And Assumptions About History, Thomas Brush, John Saye Jan 2008

The Effects Of Multimedia-Supported Problem-Based Inquiry On Student Engagement, Empathy, And Assumptions About History, Thomas Brush, John Saye

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

This research extends a continuing line of inquiry investigating how multimedia resources might be joined with other support structures to effectively implement problem-based inquiry (PBI) activities in secondary history classrooms. Two history teachers with experience in PBI implemented a technology-supported problem-based civil rights unit in their classrooms. Analysis of data obtained from classroom observations, observations of student presentations, and student and teacher interviews suggests that the multimedia problem-based unit provided an authentic context for encountering historical content, provoked empathetic views of historical dilemmas, and encouraged meaningful encounters with historical issues that promoted engagement and more advanced epistemological beliefs about history ...


Framing Collaborative Behaviors: Listening And Speaking In Problem-Based Learning, Louisa Remedios, David Clarke, Lesleyanne Hawthorne Jan 2008

Framing Collaborative Behaviors: Listening And Speaking In Problem-Based Learning, Louisa Remedios, David Clarke, Lesleyanne Hawthorne

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

PBL is described as small-group collaborative learning; however, literature on how collaboration is enacted in PBL contexts is limited. A two-year ethnographic study examined the experiences and responses of Asian students to the obligations of PBL in a Western context. Participant-observation, videotape data, and video-stimulated recall interviews provided insights into collaborative behaviors in PBL classrooms. Even though students recognized that listening and speaking were important to collaboration, speaking was clearly privileged over listening in this PBL setting. A framework was developed that incorporated both collaborative and noncollaborative listening and speaking behaviors. This Collaborative Listening/Speaking (CLS) framework provides a structure ...


The Effectiveness Of Problem-Based Instruction: A Comparative Study Of Instructional Methods And Student Characteristics, John R. Mergendoller, Nan L. Maxwell, Yolanda Bellisimo Nov 2006

The Effectiveness Of Problem-Based Instruction: A Comparative Study Of Instructional Methods And Student Characteristics, John R. Mergendoller, Nan L. Maxwell, Yolanda Bellisimo

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

This study compared the effectiveness of problem-based learning (PBL) and traditional instructional approaches in developing high-school students’ macroeconomics knowledge and examined whether PBL was differentially effective with students demonstrating different levels of four aptitudes: verbal ability, interest in economics, preference for group work, and problem-solving efficacy. Over all, PBL was found to be a more effective instructional approach for teaching macroeconomics than traditional lecture–discussion (p = .05). Additional analyses provided evidence that PBL was more effective than traditional instruction with students of average verbal ability and below, students who were more interested in learning economics, and students who were most ...


Perceptions Of The Value Of Problem-Based Learning Among Students With Special Needs And Their Teachers, Brian R. Belland, Peggy A. Ertmer, Krista D. Simons Nov 2006

Perceptions Of The Value Of Problem-Based Learning Among Students With Special Needs And Their Teachers, Brian R. Belland, Peggy A. Ertmer, Krista D. Simons

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

While problem-based learning (PBL) has been found to be effective with gifted and average students (Hmelo-Silver, 2004), little is known about its impact on students with special needs. This study examines the perceptions of middle-school students with mild, moderate, and severe disabilities and of their teachers regarding the value of participating in a PBL unit. The unit focused on the physical accessibility of a low-SES, rural community where the students’ school was located.We used the constant comparative method (Glaser & Strauss, 1967) to analyze interview data, and used observation data and artifacts to triangulate interview comments. Among the noteworthy findings ...


Preparing Teachers To Use Problem-Centered, Inquiry-Based Science: Lessons From A Four-Year Professional Development Project, James D. Lehman, Melissa George, Peggy Buchanan, Michael Rush May 2006

Preparing Teachers To Use Problem-Centered, Inquiry-Based Science: Lessons From A Four-Year Professional Development Project, James D. Lehman, Melissa George, Peggy Buchanan, Michael Rush

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

Calls for reform in science education stress the need for inquiry-based, integrative methods that provide students with opportunities to solve authentic problems. Project INSITE, a four-year professional development effort in Indiana, was designed to help teachers integrate problem-centered science methods in their classrooms. This approach was characterized by use of a meaningful driving question anchored in a real-world context; student-conducted investigations that resulted in the creation of products; collaboration among students, teachers, and the community; and use of technology as a tool for gathering and sharing information. Quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the project suggest that it was generally successful ...


The 3c3r Model: A Conceptual Framework For Designing Problems In Pbl, Woei Hung May 2006

The 3c3r Model: A Conceptual Framework For Designing Problems In Pbl, Woei Hung

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

Well-designed problems are crucial for the success of problem-based learning (PBL). Previous discussions about designing problems for PBL have been rather general and inadequate in guiding educators and practitioners to design effective PBL problems. This paper introduces the 3C3R PBL problem design model as a conceptual framework for systematically designing optimal PBL problems. The 3C3R model comprises two classes of components: core components and processing components. Core components—including content, context, and connection—support content and conceptual learning, while processing components—consisting of researching, reasoning, and reflecting—concern students’ cognitive processes and problem-solving skills. This paper discusses the model in ...


Goals And Strategies Of A Problem-Based Learning Facilitator, Cindy E. Hmelo-Silver, Howard S. Barrows May 2006

Goals And Strategies Of A Problem-Based Learning Facilitator, Cindy E. Hmelo-Silver, Howard S. Barrows

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

This paper describes an analysis of facilitation of a student-centered problem-based learning group. The focus of this analysis was to understand the goals and strategies of an expert facilitator in support of collaborative learning. This was accomplished through interaction analysis using video data and stimulated recall to examine two PBL group meetings. In this paper, we examine how specific strategies were used to support the PBL goals of helping students construct causal explanations, reason effectively, and become self-directed learners while maintaining a student-centered learning process. Being able to articulate these strategies is an important step in helping others learn the ...


Jumping The Pbl Implementation Hurdle: Supporting The Efforts Of K–12 Teachers, Peggy A. Ertmer, Krista D. Simons May 2006

Jumping The Pbl Implementation Hurdle: Supporting The Efforts Of K–12 Teachers, Peggy A. Ertmer, Krista D. Simons

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

While problem-based learning (PBL) has a relatively long history of successful use in medical and pre-professional schools, it has yet to be widely adopted by K–12 teachers. This may be due, in part, to the numerous challenges teachers experience when implementing PBL. In this paper, we describe specific hurdles that teachers are likely to encounter during the implementation process and provide specific suggestions for supporting teachers’ classroom efforts. Implementation challenges relate to 1) creating a culture of collaboration and interdependence, 2) adjusting to changing roles, and 3) scaffolding student learning and performance. By supporting teachers’ initial and ongoing efforts ...


Overview Of Problem-Based Learning: Definitions And Distinctions, John R. Savery May 2006

Overview Of Problem-Based Learning: Definitions And Distinctions, John R. Savery

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional approach that has been used successfully for over 30 years and continues to gain acceptance in multiple disciplines. It is an instructional (and curricular) learner-centered approach that empowers learners to conduct research, integrate theory and practice, and apply knowledge and skills to develop a viable solution to a defined problem. This overview presents a brief history, followed by a discussion of the similarities and differences between PBL and other experiential approaches to teaching, and identifies some of the challenges that lie ahead for PBL.