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Full-Text Articles in Education

Public Health Ethics: Informing Better Public Health Practice, Stacy M. Carter, Ian Kerridge, Peter Sainsbury, Julie K. Letts Jan 2012

Public Health Ethics: Informing Better Public Health Practice, Stacy M. Carter, Ian Kerridge, Peter Sainsbury, Julie K. Letts

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Public health ethics has emerged and grown as an independent discipline over the last decade. It involves using ethical theory and empirical analyses to determine and justify the right thing to do in public health. In this paper, we distinguish public health ethics from clinical ethics, research ethics, public health law and politics. We then discuss issues in public health ethics including: how to weigh up the benefits, harms and costs of intervening; how to ensure that public health interventions produce fair outcomes; the potential for public health to undermine or promote the rights of citizens; and the significance of …


Internet Trials: Participant Experiences And Perspectives, Erin Mathieu, Alexandra Barratt, Stacy M. Carter, Gro Jamtvedt Jan 2012

Internet Trials: Participant Experiences And Perspectives, Erin Mathieu, Alexandra Barratt, Stacy M. Carter, Gro Jamtvedt

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Background Use of the Internet to conduct randomised controlled trials is increasing, and provides potential to increase equity of access to medical research, increase the generalisability of trial results and decrease the costs involved in conducting large scale trials. Several studies have compared response rates, completeness of data, and reliability of surveys using the Internet and traditional methods, but very little is known about participants' attitudes towards Internet-based randomised trials or their experience of participating in an Internet-based trial. Objective To obtain insights into the experiences and perspectives of participants in an Internet-based randomised controlled trial, their attitudes to the …


Community Based Service-Learning: Partnerships Of Reciprocal Exchange?, Laura Ann Hammersley Jan 2012

Community Based Service-Learning: Partnerships Of Reciprocal Exchange?, Laura Ann Hammersley

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Community based service-learning (CBSL) integrates experiential learning and academic goals with organised service activities designed to meet the objectives of community partners (Bringle & Hatcher, 1995). Although research remains inconclusive regarding the benefits of student outcomes, CBSL has been endowed with the potential to enhance (1) academic learning, (2) foster civic responsibility, (3) develop life skills and (4) transform student attitudes (Eyler, 2002). However, there is little research to support claims that benefits are mutual amongst host counterparts (Edwards et al., 2001; Ward & Wolf-Wendell, 2000). A lack of empirical research into community partner conceptualisations of best practice approaches, outcomes …


What Checkers Actually Check: An Eye Tracking Study Of Inhibitory Control And Working Memory, Ben Harkin, Sebastien R. Miellet, Klaus Kessler Jan 2012

What Checkers Actually Check: An Eye Tracking Study Of Inhibitory Control And Working Memory, Ben Harkin, Sebastien R. Miellet, Klaus Kessler

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Background: Not only is compulsive checking the most common symptom in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) with an estimated prevalence of 50-80% in patients, but approximately ~15% of the general population reveal subclinical checking tendencies that impact negatively on their performance in daily activities. Therefore, it is critical to understand how checking affects attention and memory in clinical as well as subclinical checkers. Eye fixations are commonly used as indicators for the distribution of attention but research in OCD has revealed mixed results at best. Methodology/Principal Finding: Here we report atypical eye movement patterns in subclinical checkers during an ecologically valid …


Participant Experiences From Chronic Administration Of A Multivitamin Versus Placebo On Subjective Health And Wellbeing: A Double-Blind Qualitative Analysis Of A Randomised Controlled Trial, Jerome Sarris, Katherine H M Cox, David A. Camfield, Andrew Scholey, Con Stough, Erin Fogg, Marni Kras, David J. White, Avni Sali, Andrew Pipingas Jan 2012

Participant Experiences From Chronic Administration Of A Multivitamin Versus Placebo On Subjective Health And Wellbeing: A Double-Blind Qualitative Analysis Of A Randomised Controlled Trial, Jerome Sarris, Katherine H M Cox, David A. Camfield, Andrew Scholey, Con Stough, Erin Fogg, Marni Kras, David J. White, Avni Sali, Andrew Pipingas

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Background While many randomised controlled trials have been conducted on multivitamins, to our knowledge no qualitative research exploring the subjective experience of taking a multivitamin during a clinical trial has been reported. Methods Semi-structured and open-ended written questions were incorporated into a 16-week double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel groups trial of once-daily multivitamin administration. At the final study visit (week 16), three open-ended questions were posed to elucidate any positive, negative or unusual experiences from taking either the multivitamin or matched placebo. Qualitative thematic analysis was undertaken by researchers who were blind as to treatment condition of participants, and triangulation (independent …


The Feasibility And Validity Of Ambulatory Self-Report Of Psychotic Symptoms Using A Smartphone Software Application, Jasper Palmier-Claus, J Ainsworth, M Machin, C Barrowclough, Graham Dunn, Emma Barkus, A Rogers, T Wykes, S Kapur, Iain Buchan, E Salter, Shon Lewis Jan 2012

The Feasibility And Validity Of Ambulatory Self-Report Of Psychotic Symptoms Using A Smartphone Software Application, Jasper Palmier-Claus, J Ainsworth, M Machin, C Barrowclough, Graham Dunn, Emma Barkus, A Rogers, T Wykes, S Kapur, Iain Buchan, E Salter, Shon Lewis

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Background: Semi-structured interview scales for psychosis are the gold standard approach to assessing psychotic and other symptoms. However, such assessments have limitations such as recall bias, averaging, insensitivity to change and variable interrater reliability. Ambulant, real-time self-report assessment devices may hold advantages over interview measures, but it needs to be shown that the data thus collected are valid, and the collection method is acceptable, feasible and safe. We report on a monitoring system for the assessment of psychosis using smartphone technology. The primary aims were to: i) assess validity through correlations of item responses with those on widely accepted interview …


What Counts As Comprehension In Teacher Practice?, Susan Byers, Pauline T. Jones, Lisa K. Kervin Jan 2012

What Counts As Comprehension In Teacher Practice?, Susan Byers, Pauline T. Jones, Lisa K. Kervin

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Comprehension is generally considered to be an essential skill required in all learning areas. The Australian Curriculum argues that much of the explicit teaching of literacy occurs in the English learning area, and is strengthened, made specific and extended in other learning areas as students engage in a range of learning activities with significant literacy demands (ACARA, 2012, p. 9). This has important ramifications for all teachers because they are charged with the responsibility of ensuring their students acquire the literacy skills necessary for success in the discipline areas. Despite this, comprehension means different things to different people. This paper …


Developing Successful Diversionary Schemes For Youth From Remote Aboriginal Communities, Kate Senior, William Ivory, Richard D. Chenhall, Teresa Cunningham, Tricia Nagel, Robbie Lloyd, Rachel Mcmahon Jan 2012

Developing Successful Diversionary Schemes For Youth From Remote Aboriginal Communities, Kate Senior, William Ivory, Richard D. Chenhall, Teresa Cunningham, Tricia Nagel, Robbie Lloyd, Rachel Mcmahon

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This report explores the experiences and aspirations of youth in Wadeye, a remote Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory which has become synonymous with the deviant behaviours of its young people. The research was undertaken over a three year period, and builds upon a previous ten year period of community based research. As such it forms a unique longitudinal study of young people during a period of extreme change in their lives. The research applied a mixed methods approach, utilising ethnography, interviews and the application of a community wide survey. Although young community based people were the primary focus of …


The Ethical Implications Of Intervening In Bodyweight, Stacy M. Carter, Ian Kerridge, Lucie Rychetnik, Lesley King Jan 2012

The Ethical Implications Of Intervening In Bodyweight, Stacy M. Carter, Ian Kerridge, Lucie Rychetnik, Lesley King

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This chapter is about the ethical implications of health sector actions intended to change individuals' or communities' weight. We consider these implications using two hypothetical cases. The first is Megan, a 15-year-old girl whose BMI is in the range defined as obese. She has been unable to lose weight and her parents are considering seeking clinical help. The second case is the population of the state where Megan lives, in which 35% of adults and 15% of children are reportedly overweight, and 17% of adults and 5% of children obese. The minister for health, prompted by these statistics, is determined …


The Ethical Commitments Of Health Promotion Practitioners: An Empirical Study From New South Wales, Australia, Stacy M. Carter, Christiane Klinner, Ian Kerridge, Lucie Rychetnik, Vincy Li, Denise Fry Jan 2012

The Ethical Commitments Of Health Promotion Practitioners: An Empirical Study From New South Wales, Australia, Stacy M. Carter, Christiane Klinner, Ian Kerridge, Lucie Rychetnik, Vincy Li, Denise Fry

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

In this article, we provide a description of the good in health promotion based on an empirical study of health promotion practices in New South Wales, the most populous state in Australia. We found that practitioners were unified by a vision of the good in health promotion that had substantive and procedural dimensions. Substantively, the good in health promotion was teleological: it inhered in meliorism, an intention to promote health, which was understood holistically and situated in places and environments, a commitment to primary rather than secondary prevention and engagement with communities more than individuals. Procedurally, the good in health …


How To Think About Health Promotion Ethics, Stacy M. Carter, Alan Cribb, John P. Allegrante Jan 2012

How To Think About Health Promotion Ethics, Stacy M. Carter, Alan Cribb, John P. Allegrante

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Health promotion ethics is moral deliberation about health promotion and its practice. Although academics and practitioners have been writing about ethics, and especially values, in health promotion for decades, health promotion ethics is now regaining attention within the broader literature on public health ethics. Health promotion is difficult to define, and this has implications for health promotion ethics. Health promotion can be approached in two complementary ways: as a normative ideal, and as a practice. We consider the normative ideal of health promotion to be that aspect of public health practice that is particularly concerned with the equity of social …


Uncanny Animals: Thinking Differently About Ethics And The Animal-Human Relationship, Rob Irvine, Christopher J. Degeling, Ian Kerridge Jan 2012

Uncanny Animals: Thinking Differently About Ethics And The Animal-Human Relationship, Rob Irvine, Christopher J. Degeling, Ian Kerridge

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Maintaining the attention to bodily difference human and animal ontology has long been constructed on rigid physical characterizations seemingly untouched by culture. In "Reframing the Ethical Issues in Part-Human Animal Research," Haber and Benham (2012) call into question most of the formal elements of essentialism that an earlier mode of thought took for granted. Two views on the nature of human and interspecies animal bodies are in contention here. The first offers an argument grounded in the essential developmental properties of human and animal material and biological systems such that giving life to "animals with human derived material," exemplified by …


Animals-As-Patients: Improving The Practice Of Animal Experimentation, Jane Johnson, Christopher J. Degeling Jan 2012

Animals-As-Patients: Improving The Practice Of Animal Experimentation, Jane Johnson, Christopher J. Degeling

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

In this paper we propose a new way of conceptualizing animals in experimentation: the animal-as-patient. Construing and treating animals as patients offers a way of successfully addressing some of the entrenched epistemological and ethical problems within a practice of animal experimentation directed to human clinical benefit. This approach is grounded in an epistemological insight and builds on work with so-called "pet models". It relies upon the occurrence and characterization of analogous human and nonhuman animal diseases, where, if certain criteria of homology and mechanism are met, the animal simultaneously becomes a patient and a spontaneous model of the human disease.


Ethical Practice In Learning Through Participation: Showcasing And Evaluating The Pace Ethical Practice Module, Michaela Baker, Alison Beale, Laura Ann Hammersley, Kate Lloyd, Anne-Louise Semple, Karolyn L. White Jan 2012

Ethical Practice In Learning Through Participation: Showcasing And Evaluating The Pace Ethical Practice Module, Michaela Baker, Alison Beale, Laura Ann Hammersley, Kate Lloyd, Anne-Louise Semple, Karolyn L. White

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

In 2008, Macquarie University introduced the Participation and Community Engagement (PACE) initiative, which embeds units in the undergraduate curriculum that involve learning through participation, including service learning and work-integrated learning (WIL), that is mutually beneficial to the student, the University and the partner organisation. Ethical practice is thus an integral part of this initiative. However, the issue of ethical practice in these approaches to learning has not been comprehensively addressed (Peterson et al, 2007) with research ethics in undergraduate curricula also warranting further examination and integration (Crabtree, 2008; Tryon et al., 2008). To support both students and staff at Macquarie …


Places To Play Outdoors: Sedentary And Safe Or Active And Risky?, Shirley Wyver, Paul Tranter, Ellen Sandseter, Geraldine A. Naughton, Helen Little, Anita C. Bundy, Jo Ragen, Lina Engelen Jan 2012

Places To Play Outdoors: Sedentary And Safe Or Active And Risky?, Shirley Wyver, Paul Tranter, Ellen Sandseter, Geraldine A. Naughton, Helen Little, Anita C. Bundy, Jo Ragen, Lina Engelen

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

For more than a decade there has been growing concern about global reductions in physical activity and increases in sedentary behaviours. Initially, it was unclear whether children would be protected from this trend. Perhaps children's playfulness and associated activity levels would act as a protective factor. There is now compelling evidence that children's activity levels are quite sensitive to environmental factors. For example, a recent US study of activity levels in preschoolers concluded that "...the characteristics of the school have a much greater influence on a child's activity level while in school than do the child's personal demographic characteristics" (Pate …


Weight Change In Control Group Participants In Behavioural Weight Loss Interventions: A Systematic Review And Meta-Regression Study, Lauren Waters, Alexis B. St George, Tien Chey, Adrian E. Bauman Jan 2012

Weight Change In Control Group Participants In Behavioural Weight Loss Interventions: A Systematic Review And Meta-Regression Study, Lauren Waters, Alexis B. St George, Tien Chey, Adrian E. Bauman

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Background Unanticipated control group improvements have been observed in intervention trials targeting various health behaviours. This phenomenon has not been studied in the context of behavioural weight loss intervention trials. The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review and meta-regression of behavioural weight loss interventions to quantify control group weight change, and relate the size of this effect to specific trial and sample characteristics. Methods Database searches identified reports of intervention trials meeting the inclusion criteria. Data on control group weight change and possible explanatory factors were abstracted and analysed descriptively and quantitatively. Results 85 trials were …


The Impact Of Sure Start Local Programmes On Seven Year Olds And Their Families, Edward Melhuish, Jay Belsky, Alastair H. Leyland, Angela Anning, Zarrina Kurtz, Jane Tunstill, Mog Ball, Pamela Meadows, Jacqueline Barnes, Martin Frost, Beverley Botting Jan 2012

The Impact Of Sure Start Local Programmes On Seven Year Olds And Their Families, Edward Melhuish, Jay Belsky, Alastair H. Leyland, Angela Anning, Zarrina Kurtz, Jane Tunstill, Mog Ball, Pamela Meadows, Jacqueline Barnes, Martin Frost, Beverley Botting

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Sure Start Local Programmes (SSLPs), the forerunners to Sure Start Children's Centres, aimed to support young children and their families by integrating early education, childcare, healthcare and family support services in disadvantaged areas. The programmes' objectives were to improve the health and well-being of families and young children, so that the children would have a greater opportunity to do well in school and later in life. This study investigates child and family functioning in over 5000 families recruited from 150 SSLP areas, and makes comparisons with children and families in similarly disadvantaged areas not having a SSLP in order to …


Routine Outcome Monitoring And Feedback On Physical Or Mental Health Status: Evidence And Theory, Ingrid V. Carlier, Denise Meuldijk, Irene M. Van Vliet, Esther M. Van Fenema, Nic J. Van Der Wee, Frans G. Zitman Jan 2012

Routine Outcome Monitoring And Feedback On Physical Or Mental Health Status: Evidence And Theory, Ingrid V. Carlier, Denise Meuldijk, Irene M. Van Vliet, Esther M. Van Fenema, Nic J. Van Der Wee, Frans G. Zitman

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Objectives: Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM) is an important quality tool for measuring outcome of treatment in health care. The objective of this article is to summarize the evidence base that supports the provision of feedback on ROM results to (mental) health care professionals and patients. Also, some relevant theoretical aspects are considered. Methods: Literature study (Pubmed, Medline, PsychINFO, Embase Psychiatry, 1975-2009) concerning randomized controlled trials (RTC's) of ROM and feedback on physical or mental health status of patients of all ages. Main search terms were routine outcome monitoring/measurement, feedback, health status measurement, patient reported outcome measures. Results: Included were 52 …


Geographies Of Urban Politics: Pathways, Intersections, Interventions, Pauline M. Mcguirk Jan 2012

Geographies Of Urban Politics: Pathways, Intersections, Interventions, Pauline M. Mcguirk

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This paper deals with urban political geographies and, most particularly, with political economy perspectives on urban politics. It offers an account that narrates what I see as influential pathways and intersections, theoretical debates, and methodological developments that have shaped contemporary urban political geographies in this vein since the 1970s, including: the 'new urban politics', intersections with postmodernism, and postcolonialism; urban neoliberalism and the contingency of urban politics; and, most recently, poststructural political economy and the notion of assemblage. This leads me to trace the implications of the shift in understanding from urban political geography to geographies of urban politics, and …


Critical Geographies With The State: The Problem Of Social Vulnerability And The Politics Of Engaged Research, Pauline M. Mcguirk, Phillip O'Neill Jan 2012

Critical Geographies With The State: The Problem Of Social Vulnerability And The Politics Of Engaged Research, Pauline M. Mcguirk, Phillip O'Neill

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

State interventions to govern social vulnerability highlight the complexity of contemporary states, marked by neoliberal agenda but also by progressive interventions and the desire for effectiveness. This paper draws on collaborative research with government agencies on social vulnerability in the Hunter region to assess the desirability of undertaking critical geographies with the state. We see states as contested terrains invested with the institutional capacity to mobilise diverse political projects. We argue that critical research in partnership with states is possible, as are mobilisations of the agency of state institutions to promote progressive policy development. The paper explores how we might …


Cities Of Australia And The Pacific Islands, Robyn Dowling, Pauline M. Mcguirk Jan 2012

Cities Of Australia And The Pacific Islands, Robyn Dowling, Pauline M. Mcguirk

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

1. Cities in this region may be understood as forming two groups - those of Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand and those of the Pacific Islands - each with distinct characteristics. 2. All countries in this region are dominated by primate cities, but in the case of Australia primate cities are the capitals of states in the federal union. 3. Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand exhibit many of the urban characteristics of other developed countries, such as the United States. 4. The urban character of Pacific Island cities is similar to that of less developed countries though they are smaller and have …


A Systematic Review Of The Experience, Occurrence, And Controllability Of Flow States In Elite Sport, Christian F. Swann, Richard J. Keegan, David Piggott, Lee Crust Jan 2012

A Systematic Review Of The Experience, Occurrence, And Controllability Of Flow States In Elite Sport, Christian F. Swann, Richard J. Keegan, David Piggott, Lee Crust

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Objectives: This study aimed to provide an up-to-date summary of the literature on flow in elite sport, specifically relating to: (i) how flow is experienced; (ii) how these states occur; and (iii) the potential controllability of flow. Design: Systematic review. Methods: A comprehensive literature search of SPORTdiscus, PsycINFO, SAGE journals online, INGENTA connect, and Web of Knowledge was completed in August, 2011, and yielded 17 empirical studies published between 1992 and 2011. The primarily qualitative findings were analysed thematically and synthesised using a narrative approach. Results: Findings indicated that: (i) some flow dimensions appear to be experienced more consistently than …


A Country That Makes Things: Rethinking And Broadening Manufacturing, Christopher R. Gibson Jan 2012

A Country That Makes Things: Rethinking And Broadening Manufacturing, Christopher R. Gibson

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The announcement in August 2011 that BlueScope Steel were about to close one of its Port Kembla blast furnaces and cease steel exports quickly spurred public debate in Australia, not just about steel but about the very future of manufacturing in Australia. Australian Workers' Union national secretary Paul Howes thus suggested: 'The question the Australian community needs to ask itself - is do we want to be a country that still makes things? Do we want to value-­‐‑add to our natural resources, or do we want to become just one big sandpit for China and a tourism resort for North …


Sports Sponsorship And Kids' Health: Who Are The Real Winners?, Rona Macniven, Bridget Kelly Jan 2012

Sports Sponsorship And Kids' Health: Who Are The Real Winners?, Rona Macniven, Bridget Kelly

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Over the weekend, Australian children and their parents witnessed some of the country's finest sportsmen display feats of strength, skill and endurance in the Australian Football League (AFL) and National Rugby League (NRL) grand finals. I'm sure many young people would have been inspired to emulate the actions and successes of their heroes.

What spectators and viewers would also have seen was the paradoxical promotion of Carlton breweries and McDonalds in commercial advertisements during the games. The websites of the NRL, AFL reveal a similar picture of sponsorship and marketing by unhealthy food and drink companies such as Coca-Cola and …


Time #1: What's Wrong With This Picture?, Marc De Rosnay Jan 2012

Time #1: What's Wrong With This Picture?, Marc De Rosnay

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Breastfeeding generally falls under the jurisdiction of mothers, so I decided to ask a group of mothers I see regularly on Saturday morning what they thought of the recent Time magazine cover portraying an attractive young woman, hand on hip, staring down the camera while her passive three-year-old dressed in cargo pants stands on a chair and suckles from her exposed left breast. What they told me was deeply reassuring.


Assessing Alcohol Consumption In Older Adults: Looking For A Solution To Inform Evaluation Of Social Marketing Campaigns, Sandra C. Jones, Lance Barrie, Laura Robinson Jan 2012

Assessing Alcohol Consumption In Older Adults: Looking For A Solution To Inform Evaluation Of Social Marketing Campaigns, Sandra C. Jones, Lance Barrie, Laura Robinson

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Alcohol consumption in older people presents unique challenges due to changes in body composition, co-morbid conditions and associated mediations, as well as a reduction in metabolic capacity. As such, this generation has been identified as an at-risk group by the NHRMC (NHRMC, 2011). For the purpose of this paper "older" adults are individuals aged 65 years and over. The NHMRC produced guidelines for minimising the risks associated with alcohol consumption in 2001 (NHMRC, 2001). While the 2001 NHMRC guidelines did not provide specific recommendations regarding levels of consumption for older people the revised 2009 guidelines recommend, 'Older people are advised …


"I Hope This Can Be Shared With Everyone In Lots Of Schools": A Novel Intervention To Improve Social Skills Of Peers Of Children With Autism, Sandra Jones, Joanne Telenta, Fiona Mckay Jan 2012

"I Hope This Can Be Shared With Everyone In Lots Of Schools": A Novel Intervention To Improve Social Skills Of Peers Of Children With Autism, Sandra Jones, Joanne Telenta, Fiona Mckay

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are lifelong developmental disabilities characterised by marked difficulties in social interaction, impaired communication, restricted and repetitive interests and behaviours, and sensory sensitivities (Aspect 2009). While there is considerable debate as to prevalence, Centrelink data shows an estimated prevalence of 62.5 per 10,000 for 6-12 year old children (McDermott et al. 2007). While young children find social situations aversive and prefer to play alone, as these children reach their teens many desire social contact with their peers but lack the ability to form and maintain friendships. Observations in schools demonstrate peer interaction in children with ASDs is …


Supply Means Supply - What Does 'Supply' Mean? Consumer Responses To A Campaign Targeting Secondary Supply Of Alcohol To Teenagers, Sandra C. Jones, Laura Robinson, Heidi Gilchrist, Lance Barrie Jan 2012

Supply Means Supply - What Does 'Supply' Mean? Consumer Responses To A Campaign Targeting Secondary Supply Of Alcohol To Teenagers, Sandra C. Jones, Laura Robinson, Heidi Gilchrist, Lance Barrie

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

A significant factor contributing to the problem of underage drinking is the 'secondary supply' of alcohol to minors. Secondary supply by parents for consumption in private settings is legal in most states of Australia including NSW. The NSW Police Force, in partnership with the Central Coast Health Promotion Unit, developed a community-based intervention to address the issue of secondary supply of alcohol to minors ('Supply Means Supply'). This paper reports on a series of focus groups to examine in more depth the drivers of attitudes towards secondary supply to minors, and to assess responses to the Supply Means Supply campaign …


Training Self-Assessment And Task-Selection Skills: A Cognitive Approach To Improving Self-Regulated Learning, Danny Kostons, Tamara Van Gog, Fred Paas Jan 2012

Training Self-Assessment And Task-Selection Skills: A Cognitive Approach To Improving Self-Regulated Learning, Danny Kostons, Tamara Van Gog, Fred Paas

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

For self-regulated learning to be effective, students need to be able to accurately assess their own performance on a learning task and use this assessment for the selection of a new learning task. Evidence suggests, however, that students have difficulties with accurate self-assessment and task selection, which may explain the poor learning outcomes often found with self-regulated learning. In experiment 1, the hypothesis was investigated and confirmed that observing a human model engaging in self-assessment, task selection, or both could be effective for secondary education students' (N=80) acquisition of self- assessment and task-selection skills. Experiment 2 investigated and confirmed the …


Effects Of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration On Human Encoding And Recall Memory Function: A Pharmacological Fmri Study, Matthijs G. Bossong, Gerry Jager, Hendrika H. Van Hell, Lineke Zuurman, J Martijn Jansma, Mitul A. Mehta, Joop M. A Van Gerven, Rene S. Kahn, Nick F. Ramsey Jan 2012

Effects Of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration On Human Encoding And Recall Memory Function: A Pharmacological Fmri Study, Matthijs G. Bossong, Gerry Jager, Hendrika H. Van Hell, Lineke Zuurman, J Martijn Jansma, Mitul A. Mehta, Joop M. A Van Gerven, Rene S. Kahn, Nick F. Ramsey

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Deficits in memory function are an incapacitating aspect of various psychiatric and neurological disorders. Animal studies have recently provided strong evidence for involvement of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in memory function. Neuropsychological studies in humans have shown less convincing evidence but suggest that administration of cannabinoid substances affects encoding rather than recall of information. In this study, we examined the effects of perturbation of the eCB system on memory function during both encoding and recall. We performed a pharmacological MRI study with a placebo-controlled, crossover design, investigating the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) inhalation on associative memory-related brain function in 13 …